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Leaks during dry shaking


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I guess my question here is two-part:

 

(1) I recently purchased Koriko tins and had previously been using a tin plus a bar glass. With my old set up, whenever I would dry shake, inevitably a few seconds in, liquid would start to leak out and onto the sides of the glass. It also seemed like there was some pressure and I'd sometimes hear a faint hiss of air being released. Sometimes the problem was bad enough that I'd lose a fair amount of liquid around the edge of the seal, and more when I popped the tin and glass apart (which I'm assuming was related to pressure). Once I introduced ice, there was no issue.

 

With the Koriko tins, the seal is MUCH better but there is still the occasional leak during dry shaking. Adding ice again solves whatever problem there was.

 

Does this happen to anyone else where there's a leak only during dry shakes, but not once ice is introduced? How do I fix this?

 

(2) What's been really bugging me is: why is there only leaking during dry shaking, but not when ice is introduced? What causes this phenomenon? Is this an effect of temperature?

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Try 'dry' shaking with a single ice cube (what I do), or run the tins under cold water before shaking to contract them.

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”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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http://forums.egullet.org/topic/102593-egg-whites-emulsifying-tricks-and-tips/?p=1507775

 

When you dry shake at room temperature, you evaporate some of the alcohol into the airspace, which expands giving the air in the shaker "positive internal pressure." This is the opposite of the "negative pressure" that is created when shaking with ice, which we all know helps to keep the pieces of the shaker together. The end result is that some of the air inside the shaker would like to escape to create equilibrium. The same thing would happen were you to dry shake with warm water.


NB. There is really no such thing as "positive or negative pressure." What we mean by saying this is "greater or less than atmospheric pressure."

 
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True rye and true bourbon wake delight like any great wine...dignify man as possessing a palate that responds to them and ennoble his soul as shimmering with the response.

DeVoto, The Hour

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Try 'dry' shaking with a single ice cube (what I do), or run the tins under cold water before shaking to contract them.

 

Both great suggestions. I'm also fond of the 'crushed ice' method for egg white drinks (adding just enough crushed ice for desired dilution and shaking until it is fully dissolved).

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True rye and true bourbon wake delight like any great wine...dignify man as possessing a palate that responds to them and ennoble his soul as shimmering with the response.

DeVoto, The Hour

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Both great suggestions. I'm also fond of the 'crushed ice' method for egg white drinks (adding just enough crushed ice for desired dilution and shaking until it is fully dissolved).

This is related to how a lot of bars (including mine) prepare their Ramos Fizzes: shaking with a single 1.5" x 1.5" ice cube until it's fully dissolved, which allows enough time for the egg whites to emulsify without diluting excessively.

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DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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Thanks for the suggestions, everyone. I'll try the single ice cube.

 

Rafa, this actually came up with the Koriko tins in the context of a Ramos last night. I otherwise haven't been experiencing any leaks since switching over to the Korikos, but I think the extra-long dry shake for a Ramos is what pushed it over the edge.

 

FP, I've seen you advocate for the stick blender in other threads--will give that a try with my next one.

 

KD1191, thank you especially for the repost from Mr. Kinsey. The mechanics/why behind the leaking were driving me nuts, but this explanation makes a lot of sense. Fascinating to my layman's brain.

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