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Why does tart dough shrink after baking?


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Hi there,

 

Why does tart dough shrink after baking? I was set the dough in refrigerator 20 minutes before baking and I don't think rub the dough very much

 

The shrink cause the edge doesn't look good and how cna I make beauty edge as below.

 

Thank you.

 

008-tarte-au-citron.jpg?w=545&h=363

 

source of picture: http://roodelia.com/2013/03/

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Off the top of my head, several possibilities: the dough was over worked and gluten developed too much, the dough sat around too long and gluten developed too much, there was too much liquid in the dough gluten developed and there was shrinkage due to evaporation, the dough was handled with hot hands which broke the emulsion in the butter hydrating the dough too much while developing too much gluten from both the moisture and warmth, the dough wasn't docked.

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A sweet tart dough or Pate sucree will give neater edges than a flaky pie dough or Pate brisee.

Other than that, overworking, too much water, and kitchen gremlins might be to blame.

Darienne, I think Chris means that they bake the tart shell then use a microPlane zester to shave the edges down even with the tart ring.

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I do agree about the gluten development for the dough, i have also seen to much grease around the ring causing the dough to slip down from the sides because of the added fat/oil baking into the walls.  I usually freeze the shells before baking, 98% of the time i dont' have problems with shrinkage.

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To be done perfectly as shown in your photo, you need to cut a circle for the base and a strip for the side as explained in this link:

 

http://www.likeastrawberrymilk.com/2015/01/notes-blind-baking-tarts/

 

I think you'll be happy with the results.

I doubt that I will ever learn to bake a perfect tart shell but the tutorial you linked to is fascinating so I just wanted to say thank you.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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To be done perfectly as shown in your photo, you need to cut a circle for the base and a strip for the side as explained in this link:

 

http://www.likeastrawberrymilk.com/2015/01/notes-blind-baking-tarts/

 

I think you'll be happy with the results.

 

Interesting method, but if you've got your technique down you don't need to do the circle/strip thing.  It sounds like a lot of effort.

 

Just make sure you tamp the dough down properly into the corners.  You can pick the ring up to make sure- when it's flush with the corners, docked and properly rested you should have no problems with slippage.

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To be done perfectly as shown in your photo, you need to cut a circle for the base and a strip for the side as explained in this link:

 

http://www.likeastrawberrymilk.com/2015/01/notes-blind-baking-tarts/

 

I think you'll be happy with the results.

 

Fanny has great technique and has worked at some quality places. I was a big fan of her old blog, some fantastic posts on explaining basics of pastry

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