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Suvir Saran

Baked Ziti

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Ed and I tried Baked Ziti at DiFara's on Monday.

It was made well, but certainly not the best either one of us had ever eaten.

As usual the sauce was delicious. The cheese was good, but we both missed the ricotta that some add to Ziti.

The Ziti (pasta) was cooked perfectly and was excellent.

How do you make your Ziti?

Do you add ricotta?

Do you have a favorite place where you get Baked Ziti?

Have a favorite recipe for it?

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I make ziti with a basic tomato sauce (sofritto, tiunned San Marzano, bit of red wine), slab bacon lardons, pancetta, hot Italian sausage meat, liver sausage. The copious leftovers are packed into baking pans for ziti pasticchio with toasted bread crumbs and croutons, shaved and grated parmesan or Gran Padano or pecorino or combination thereof. Baked at 350 F for at least an hour until crusty.

Now as to ricotta. Sometimes I'll serve a mound of cold ricotta with the hot, crunchy and tender ziti. But often not because the temperature contrast will be a salad or chilled tomato consomme or somesuch.


"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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This reminds me. I have friends coming over to dinner on Sunday. They come every couple of weeks to eat and catch up on the Sopranos (they don't get the channel that's showing the new series). I always feel I should cook something vaguely related. But ... they're vegetarian. So no baked ziti :(

I've been through pretty much everything I can think of, from pasta alla norma on, and I'm getting desperate (quite a way into the series now). Any ideas for a Sopranosesque vegetarian meal (a contradiction in terms I think) that isn't yet another variation on alla norma? And is appropriate to winter? (No, they don't eat fish or seafood either.)

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Kiku-chan, do baked ziti with cecce (chickpeas) and mushrooms. Finish with ricotta, mint, and parsley.

I forget to mention mushrooms. I almost always use mushrooms, usually a combination of reconstituted porcini and fresh cremini.


"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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Jinmyo

great idea. thank you. They just cancelled on me for Sunday, but will use next time :smile:

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No ricotta for this one. It's the texture AND the look. I find it off-putting.

My own taste YMMV

Nick

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Kiku-chan, do baked ziti with cecce (chickpeas) and mushrooms. Finish with ricotta, mint, and parsley.

I forget to mention mushrooms. I almost always use mushrooms, usually a combination of reconstituted porcini and fresh cremini.

Jin,

That sounds great!

I have only baked pasta a couple of times (usually leftover) and always find it bland.

I've done it with and without the ricotta and prefer it with, but like the idea of serving it on the side.

As of today I have started keeping a little notebook next to the computer, so I can jot down recipe ideas so I don't forget them. I always think, surely I won't forget that one................ :wacko:


Kristin Wagner, aka "torakris"

 

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I much prefer baked ziti with ricotta. Some very rich tasting tomato sauce is also essential.

Boil the ziti until very al dente. Prepare your favorite Italian style tomato sauce using San Marzano tomatoes and cook it down to concentrate the tomato flavor, you don't want it watery.

Soften chopped garlic in olive oil and at the very end add some shredded basil.

Combine whole milk ricotta with some parmagiano reggiano and chopped parsley. Add softened garlic and basil.

Combine hot pasta, sauce and ricotta and mix lightly.

Cover with mozzerella and a sprinkling of parmagiana and bake.

I have no amounts for you or timing or temp. What can I say. I make this off the cuff but its great and much better than ziti without ricotta.

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I much prefer baked ziti with ricotta.  Some very rich tasting tomato sauce is also essential.

Boil the ziti until very al dente.  Prepare your favorite Italian style tomato sauce using San Marzano tomatoes and cook it down to concentrate the tomato flavor, you don't want it watery.

Soften chopped garlic in olive oil and at the very end add some shredded basil.

Combine whole milk ricotta with some parmagiano reggiano and chopped parsley.  Add softened garlic and basil.

Combine hot pasta, sauce and ricotta and mix lightly.

Cover with mozzerella and a sprinkling of parmagiana and bake.

I have no amounts for you or timing or temp.  What can I say.  I make this off the cuff but its great and much better than ziti without ricotta.

You stole my recipe :angry::biggrin:

I do the same as you.. and actually this is one way I am able to enjoy ricotta. I have only found it tasty at Lupa where I loved it and it may have been because of the company.

I have often added mushrooms and sweet peppers into the deeply cooked tomato sauce.

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I always use ricotta in Ziti but my girl's grandma never does. She's Silician and even makes her Lasagna without cheese but adds hard-boiled eggs. Is DiFara Sicilian ?

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