Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Another player enters the sous vide field: Paragon Induction Cooktop


MSRadell
 Share

Recommended Posts

5 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

Great news!  My ancient set of 1970's Wonder Ware* works perfectly on the Paragon.

 

 

*Multi-plex, Made in America Stainless Steel

And the funny little thermometer probe on the Paragon would fit over their lip. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

Great news!  My ancient set of 1970's Wonder Ware* works perfectly on the Paragon.

 

 

*Multi-plex, Made in America Stainless Steel

 

On a similar note, I'll add that the elderly SaladMaster pots I got from my uncle (purchased by his wife when she was in med school, 50 years ago, and still immaculate) work just fine on induction.

  • Like 1

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

And the funny little thermometer probe on the Paragon would fit over their lip. 

 

Indeed.  I never thought to try the Wonder Wear because I assumed they would not work.  So far all my pots and pans* are good on the Paragon except for Cuisinart and Falk.  And one old aluminum All-Clad LTD bain-marie that I use for rice pudding once a year.

 

Unfortunately I have a lot of Cuisinart and Falk.  But on the bright side Falk just announced their new induction compatible product line.

 

 

*including my Makoto Koizumi rosewood handled yukihira pot.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
12 hours ago, lemniscate said:

Has anyone used the silicon mat that comes with the Paragon yet?   If so, what did you cook?

 

 

https://forums.egullet.org/topic/150644-another-player-enters-the-sous-vide-field-paragon-induction-cooktop/?do=findComment&comment=2216421

 

Also for braising and for making tomato sauce.  The mat works really well.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, mgaretz said:

This pot arrived today.  4.4 qts and induction compatible.  Sold as a steamer but I am going to try it as a small fry pot with the Paragon.  The basket seems perfect for frying.  It was just $25.99 and by Cook N Home.

 

pot-for-paragon.jpg.52d6166df65460bb9201ddc7b4fd7c33.jpg

 

Very nice, and if you have an immersion circulator/bath setup you can put small jars (SV egg bites, custard), etc in the mesh basket for easy in-and-out.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Finally pulled out my Paragon.  I've been using this recipe for homemade whole milk ricotta-like cheese.  Holding the temp @ ~ 185°F for 20 min after adding the acid does seem to improve the yield but was fiddly for me to do without overshooting, which resulted in a dry and less creamy cheese.  What a pleasure it was to just set the temp, add the acid when it beeped and then let it go!  Nice yield and perfect texture!

I'd planned to keep this thing out in the garage but I think I may want it close by!

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 10/18/2019 at 3:57 PM, mgaretz said:

This pot arrived today.  4.4 qts and induction compatible.  Sold as a steamer but I am going to try it as a small fry pot with the Paragon.  The basket seems perfect for frying.  It was just $25.99 and by Cook N Home.

 

Oh, brilliant! You're reminding me I have this Kuhn-Rikon "fourth burner" pot that would work similarly. Though I like your mesh basket better.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 10/16/2019 at 11:47 AM, lemniscate said:

Has anyone used the silicon mat that comes with the Paragon yet?   If so, what did you cook?

 

I'm really hoping I can use it to "dial in" perfect settings for a stovetop pressure cooker. Being able to brown at high heat and then ignore it like an Instant Pot is a bit of a holy grail.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, dtremit said:

 

Oh, brilliant! You're reminding me I have this Kuhn-Rikon "fourth burner" pot that would work similarly. Though I like your mesh basket better.


That was one of the ones I considered, but like you said, the basket on this one is better for the job and it was less expensive. 

Mark

My eG Food Blog

www.markiscooking.com

My T shirt site: Guy Bling

My NEW Ribs site: BlasphemyRibs.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, dtremit said:

 

Oh, brilliant! You're reminding me I have this Kuhn-Rikon "fourth burner" pot that would work similarly. Though I like your mesh basket better.

 

The link goes to a Sur La Table pot "Made in China exclusively for Sur La Tab".  No mention of Kuhn-Rikon?  The bottom is aluminum.  Have you tried the pot with the Paragon?

 

I would like to find a similarly proportioned frying basket that would fit my Fissler.  For frying chicken, tongs work great; for French fries not so much.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

The link goes to a Sur La Table pot "Made in China exclusively for Sur La Tab".  No mention of Kuhn-Rikon?  The bottom is aluminum.  Have you tried the pot with the Paragon?

 

I would like to find a similarly proportioned frying basket that would fit my Fissler.  For frying chicken, tongs work great; for French fries not so much.

 

 

I ordered this pot, the Cook N Home one that @mgaretz pictured above.  It was $25 when I ordered yesterday, $35 now.  The description says it's induction compatible.

 

When I searched for the above pot, this Khun-Rikon pot which looks very similar to the Sur La Table pot also came up.  The description indicates that it works for induction and users confirm this in comments and reviews. I liked the idea of the pour spout on that one but I went for the cheaper and slightly larger one. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wanting to use my Paragon to caramelize a bunch of onions. Anyone know a suggestion on temp? I'll be using some of these immediately, and packaging and freezing others. I just want light-to-medium caramelization, so the onions still have some structural integrity.

 

Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just put in an order for one from RC Willey (thank you for the lead on that great price).  
I used to have a Tatung single burner induction unit that I picked up for about $100.  I let my sister borrow it a few years ago and let her keep it when I moved out of state.  I've been thinking about picking up another one for some time now, but was waiting for the right price.  At $70 - it's definitely the right price.  With the added temperature control feature, I couldn't pass up the deal.  It should make deep frying (which is what I used the old Tatung most often for) much easier.  

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By Anonymous Modernist 16589
      I'm looking to buy some new pots and pans and would like to tap into your knowledege and experiance with them. Which pans tend to yield the best and most consistant results. Same for pots. Any and all recommendations would be greatly appriciated, thank you in advance.
      Herman 8D
    • By Doodad
      Has anybody tried making a dark roux in a pressure cooker? Can this be done without scortching do you think? I have made roux in the oven before and started wondering about this topic.
    • By kostbill
      I really want to improve the flavor of my chicken breast so I want to try to inject brine with fat and flavors.
       
      I would like to try brining with some hydrocolloids. The one example I found is this: https://torontofoodlab.com/2013/08/20/meat-tenderizing-with-a-carrageenan-brine/.
       
      However I cannot apply that to my chicken breast because I am cooking it sous vide, so the chicken will not reach the temperature needed for the carrageenan to gel.
       
      I am thinking of using Methyl cellulose, first disperse in hot water, then leave it for 24 hours in the fridge, then add salt, fat and flavors and inject it.
      I am afraid that until it reaches the 50C or 60C that the Methyl cellulose needs in order to gel, the liquid will escape.
      Any ideas?
      Thanks.
    • By Anonymous Modernist 760
      Thanks for putting up this forum 🙂
      I would like to bake using a combination of sous vide and a conventional oven. Would it be possible to put the dough in a vacuum bag cook it sous vide at 37C for the dough to raise optimal and then put it in a conventional oven?
      Thanks
    • By PedroG
      Olla podrida sous vide
      Origin
      Not rotten pot, but mighty or rich pot! Originated in 16th century Spain, olla poderida became olla podrida and was falsely translated into French as pot-pourri.
      Ingredients
      For two servings
      * 100g Brisket well marbled, cooked SV 48h/55°C, large dice †
      * 100g Pork meat well marbled, cooked SV 24h/55°C, large dice †
      * 100g Lamb chops without bone, cooked SV 4h/55°C, large dice †
      * 100g Chicken breast, cooked SV 2h/58°C, large dice †
      * 100g Chorizo, sliced approximately 4mm †
      * 125g Chickpeas (garbanzos), soaked overnight in water †
      * 1 Onion chopped medium-fine †
      * ½ Savoy cabbage approx. 200g cut into pieces, thick leaf veins removed
      * ½ Celeriac approx. 200g quartered, sliced about 2mm
      * 2 Carrots sliced approximately 120g about 3mm
      * 1 Leek approximately 20cm / 100g sliced about 5mm
      * Extra virgin olive oil
      * Rice bran oil
      * Dried parsley qs, aromatic, black pepper
      † Beef, pork, lamb and chicken (or at least two kinds of meat) as well as chorizo, chickpeas and onions are mandatory ingredients, other vegetables vary according to desire and availability.
      Cooking
      Boil chickpeas in water for 30-60 min.
      Sauté onions in olive oil, add chorizo, continue sautéing, add chickpeas including its cooking water, add remaining vegetables, cover and cook to the desired softness, stir from time to time. If additional liquid is needed, you may add Sherry instead of water.
      Reduce heat. Season to taste. Add parsley.
      In a heavy skillet, sear the meat dice in just smoking hot rice bran oil (very high smoking point allows very quick sear, not overdoing the center of the meat).
      Sear one kind of meat at a time and transfer to the pan with the vegetables.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...