Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Another player enters the sous vide field: Paragon Induction Cooktop


MSRadell
 Share

Recommended Posts

5 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

Great news!  My ancient set of 1970's Wonder Ware* works perfectly on the Paragon.

 

 

*Multi-plex, Made in America Stainless Steel

And the funny little thermometer probe on the Paragon would fit over their lip. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

Great news!  My ancient set of 1970's Wonder Ware* works perfectly on the Paragon.

 

 

*Multi-plex, Made in America Stainless Steel

 

On a similar note, I'll add that the elderly SaladMaster pots I got from my uncle (purchased by his wife when she was in med school, 50 years ago, and still immaculate) work just fine on induction.

  • Like 1

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

And the funny little thermometer probe on the Paragon would fit over their lip. 

 

Indeed.  I never thought to try the Wonder Wear because I assumed they would not work.  So far all my pots and pans* are good on the Paragon except for Cuisinart and Falk.  And one old aluminum All-Clad LTD bain-marie that I use for rice pudding once a year.

 

Unfortunately I have a lot of Cuisinart and Falk.  But on the bright side Falk just announced their new induction compatible product line.

 

 

*including my Makoto Koizumi rosewood handled yukihira pot.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
12 hours ago, lemniscate said:

Has anyone used the silicon mat that comes with the Paragon yet?   If so, what did you cook?

 

 

https://forums.egullet.org/topic/150644-another-player-enters-the-sous-vide-field-paragon-induction-cooktop/?do=findComment&comment=2216421

 

Also for braising and for making tomato sauce.  The mat works really well.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, mgaretz said:

This pot arrived today.  4.4 qts and induction compatible.  Sold as a steamer but I am going to try it as a small fry pot with the Paragon.  The basket seems perfect for frying.  It was just $25.99 and by Cook N Home.

 

pot-for-paragon.jpg.52d6166df65460bb9201ddc7b4fd7c33.jpg

 

Very nice, and if you have an immersion circulator/bath setup you can put small jars (SV egg bites, custard), etc in the mesh basket for easy in-and-out.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Finally pulled out my Paragon.  I've been using this recipe for homemade whole milk ricotta-like cheese.  Holding the temp @ ~ 185°F for 20 min after adding the acid does seem to improve the yield but was fiddly for me to do without overshooting, which resulted in a dry and less creamy cheese.  What a pleasure it was to just set the temp, add the acid when it beeped and then let it go!  Nice yield and perfect texture!

I'd planned to keep this thing out in the garage but I think I may want it close by!

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 10/18/2019 at 3:57 PM, mgaretz said:

This pot arrived today.  4.4 qts and induction compatible.  Sold as a steamer but I am going to try it as a small fry pot with the Paragon.  The basket seems perfect for frying.  It was just $25.99 and by Cook N Home.

 

Oh, brilliant! You're reminding me I have this Kuhn-Rikon "fourth burner" pot that would work similarly. Though I like your mesh basket better.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 10/16/2019 at 11:47 AM, lemniscate said:

Has anyone used the silicon mat that comes with the Paragon yet?   If so, what did you cook?

 

I'm really hoping I can use it to "dial in" perfect settings for a stovetop pressure cooker. Being able to brown at high heat and then ignore it like an Instant Pot is a bit of a holy grail.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, dtremit said:

 

Oh, brilliant! You're reminding me I have this Kuhn-Rikon "fourth burner" pot that would work similarly. Though I like your mesh basket better.


That was one of the ones I considered, but like you said, the basket on this one is better for the job and it was less expensive. 

Mark

My eG Food Blog

www.markiscooking.com

My T shirt site: Guy Bling

My NEW Ribs site: BlasphemyRibs.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, dtremit said:

 

Oh, brilliant! You're reminding me I have this Kuhn-Rikon "fourth burner" pot that would work similarly. Though I like your mesh basket better.

 

The link goes to a Sur La Table pot "Made in China exclusively for Sur La Tab".  No mention of Kuhn-Rikon?  The bottom is aluminum.  Have you tried the pot with the Paragon?

 

I would like to find a similarly proportioned frying basket that would fit my Fissler.  For frying chicken, tongs work great; for French fries not so much.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 hours ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

The link goes to a Sur La Table pot "Made in China exclusively for Sur La Tab".  No mention of Kuhn-Rikon?  The bottom is aluminum.  Have you tried the pot with the Paragon?

 

I would like to find a similarly proportioned frying basket that would fit my Fissler.  For frying chicken, tongs work great; for French fries not so much.

 

 

I ordered this pot, the Cook N Home one that @mgaretz pictured above.  It was $25 when I ordered yesterday, $35 now.  The description says it's induction compatible.

 

When I searched for the above pot, this Khun-Rikon pot which looks very similar to the Sur La Table pot also came up.  The description indicates that it works for induction and users confirm this in comments and reviews. I liked the idea of the pour spout on that one but I went for the cheaper and slightly larger one. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wanting to use my Paragon to caramelize a bunch of onions. Anyone know a suggestion on temp? I'll be using some of these immediately, and packaging and freezing others. I just want light-to-medium caramelization, so the onions still have some structural integrity.

 

Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I just put in an order for one from RC Willey (thank you for the lead on that great price).  
I used to have a Tatung single burner induction unit that I picked up for about $100.  I let my sister borrow it a few years ago and let her keep it when I moved out of state.  I've been thinking about picking up another one for some time now, but was waiting for the right price.  At $70 - it's definitely the right price.  With the added temperature control feature, I couldn't pass up the deal.  It should make deep frying (which is what I used the old Tatung most often for) much easier.  

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By Anonymous Modernist 16589
      I'm looking to buy some new pots and pans and would like to tap into your knowledege and experiance with them. Which pans tend to yield the best and most consistant results. Same for pots. Any and all recommendations would be greatly appriciated, thank you in advance.
      Herman 8D
    • By Doodad
      Has anybody tried making a dark roux in a pressure cooker? Can this be done without scortching do you think? I have made roux in the oven before and started wondering about this topic.
    • By kostbill
      I really want to improve the flavor of my chicken breast so I want to try to inject brine with fat and flavors.
       
      I would like to try brining with some hydrocolloids. The one example I found is this: https://torontofoodlab.com/2013/08/20/meat-tenderizing-with-a-carrageenan-brine/.
       
      However I cannot apply that to my chicken breast because I am cooking it sous vide, so the chicken will not reach the temperature needed for the carrageenan to gel.
       
      I am thinking of using Methyl cellulose, first disperse in hot water, then leave it for 24 hours in the fridge, then add salt, fat and flavors and inject it.
      I am afraid that until it reaches the 50C or 60C that the Methyl cellulose needs in order to gel, the liquid will escape.
      Any ideas?
      Thanks.
    • By Anonymous Modernist 760
      Thanks for putting up this forum 🙂
      I would like to bake using a combination of sous vide and a conventional oven. Would it be possible to put the dough in a vacuum bag cook it sous vide at 37C for the dough to raise optimal and then put it in a conventional oven?
      Thanks
    • By PedroG
      Utilization of meat leftovers from sous-vide cooking
      Sometimes when you buy a nice cut of meat, your eyes are bigger than your and your beloved's stomach. So what to do with the leftovers?
      In Tyrolia (Austria) they make a "Gröstl", in Solothurn (Switzerland) they make a "Gnusch", in the Seftigenamt (a region in the Swiss canton Berne) they make a "Gmüder", and we (Pedro and SWAMBO) make a varying concoct using ideas from all of the three. We call it "Gröstl", but it is not necessarily a typical Tyrolean Gröstl, and it is different each time, and we usually do not top it with a fried egg as they do in Austria.
      Ingredients

      All your meat leftovers
      Onion (compulsory)
      Any hard vegetable (we prefer celery stalks, or zucchini)
      Any salad (iceberg lettuce or endive/chicory or any other salad leaves, may contain carrot julienne)
      Fried potatoes, or alternatively sweetcorn kernels
      Sherry or wine or bouillon or the gravy you preserved from your last LTLT.cooked meat for simmering (I usually prefer Sherry)
      Eventually some cream (or crème fraîche)
      Salt, pepper, parsley, caraway seeds (typical for Tyrolean Gröstl), paprika, condiment (in Switzerland we use "Aromat" by Knorr, which contains sodium chloride, sodium glutamate, lactose, starch, yeast extract, vegetable fats, onions, spices, E552)'
      vegetable oil (I prefer olive oil)




      Mise en place

      cut your meat in small cubes or slices
      cut the onion(s) not too fine (place the first cut below your tongue to avoid tearing during cutting)
      cut the vegetables about 3-4 mm thick
      cut the salads to pieces smaller than 4 cm, distribute on the cutting board and season deliberately
      cut the potatoes to 1 cm cubes
      place 3 heavy skillets with ample oil on the stove

      Cooking

      in skillet 1, stir-fry the onions, add the hard vegetables still stir-frying, add salad, add sufficient liquid (Sherry or wine or bouillon or gravy) for simmering under a cover until soft. If desired, reduce heat and add some cream at the end.
      in skillet 2, stir-fry the potatoes until soft (in case of sweetcorn kernels, add to skillet 1 after stir-frying and use skillet 2 for skillet 3)
      in skillet 3, as soon as the vegetables and the potatoes are soft, sear the meat in just smoking oil for 30-60 seconds, then add to skillet 1

      Serving
      You may mix the potatoes with the vegetables and meat to make a rather typical Gröstl, or serve the fried potatoes separately; we prefer the latter, as the potatoes stay more crunchy.
      Do not forget to serve a glass of good dry red wine!
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...