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Odd taste in pan seared steak


chris_s
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Hello,

 

I've noticed whenever I've prepared steaks in a frying pan (either completely cooking a thinner steak or recently searing SV'd steaks) they have a distinct taste to them that's just not as nice as steaks finished on grill. 

 

I wonder if it's either the oil or the type of pan I'm using. I use canola oil (as that's what I generally have on hand) and have used a stainless steel and a teflon frying pan, heated very hot on a smoothtop stove (not sure if relevant)

 

The steaks end up with a nice looking maillard effect crust

 

Does cast iron affect taste, or am I just using the wrong kind of oil? 

 

January in Winnipeg doesn't make for good bbqing

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you are probably not getting a bit of 'char' in the pan you get on a BBQ/Grill

 

char = burnt maillard

 

and in the BBQ/Grill you might be getting some smoke flavor

 

taste the canola at room temp.  maybe its oxidized and a bit rancid.

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I don't like frying things in canola oil, because it invariably develops (to my senses) a fishy note...maybe not so bad with fish, but definitely off with red meat or with chicken. Others here have noted the same thing, whereas other people don't notice a change. Try using a different oil...safflower or sunflower, or grapeseed if you can get it. They're all neutral oils with high smoke points.

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
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And superheating a nonstick pan is not a good move.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

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If you have a cast iron grill pan, you may find the results more to your liking - and don't use oil at all. If I were searing off a pre-SV'd steak in a pan (other than a grill pan) I would use a heavy stainless (not non-stick) or plain, well seasoned cast iron, and perhaps a bit of butter at the end to finish it.

Edited by Deryn (log)
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I concur with Deryn, tho I use a plain cast iron pan, not a grill pan. No need for any oil at all in a properly seasoned pan. Teflon is a no-no for steak: Heat too high, doesn't produce satisfactory char to my taste.

Many of us tend to forget the usefulness of an oven broiler, assuming yours can reach a suitably high temp. Obviously not as good as charcoal, or even a gas grill, but it can produce excellent results.

Edited by rlibkind (log)
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Bob Libkind aka "rlibkind"

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Canola oil!

I hate the stuff!!!!!

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~Martin :)

I just don't want to look back and think "I could have eaten that."

Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it!

 

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I agree with Smithy about the oil.  For most of my searing and pan frying I use a high temperature safflower oil or a grape seed oil.  Actually, I'm phasing out the grape seed oil and using THIS.

 

And it may be to your advantage not to use the nonstick pan.

Edited by Shel_B (log)

 ... Shel


 

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Hello thanks for all the replies!

 

to clarify, I've noticed this taste over a few years of trying this every once in a while, so it's not the same batch of canola oil. I also have not used the non-stick pan for this purpose since I read that they were not suitable for high heats, I only offered that information up as evidence that I've had the same results with multiple types of pans. 

 

I'm going to get some safflower oil to try with my heavy stainless pan. Will report back! 

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ive given up on canola for some time and use grape-seed for my neutral oil, EVOO for the rest

 

and non-canola 'On Sale- any kind of veg. oil for the brownies that go to the library

 

Rum is a great equalizer as are 1 cup of TJ's dark chocolate chips.

Edited by rotuts (log)
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You Bet.  it should be called RapeSeed oil,  but those clever Folks North of the Border decided

 

that might not be the best 'Handle'

 

so  Canadian Oil  became Canola.

 

it is said to be 'healthy'  back then

 

Health from time to time is not exactly Tasty.

 

of course, Buck for Buck

 

think 'Lite Olive Oil'  ie heated high temp dregs  ....

 

I can imagine our Northern Friends not figuring this out

 

What Else does one to North of the Border in the Winter ?

 

sorry, forgot   Hockey and Beer

 

as far as I can tell ...

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I use a well-seasoned, (meaning years of cooking), cast iron pan that doesn't need any oil.  For a New York steak about 1" thick, sear it in a hot cast-iron pan.  (Have the windows open and the fan turned on high).  I sear each side about 3 1/2 min., then into a hot 450 oven for another 3 min. per side.  Take it out of the oven and onto a wire rack to rest.  I live to save the juices for a sauce.  With this basic technique I get a medium-rare steak every time.

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  • 3 weeks later...

You Bet.  it should be called RapeSeed oil,  but those clever Folks North of the Border decided

 

that might not be the best 'Handle'

 

so  Canadian Oil  became Canola.

 

it is said to be 'healthy'  back then

 

Health from time to time is not exactly Tasty.

 

of course, Buck for Buck

 

think 'Lite Olive Oil'  ie heated high temp dregs  ....

 

I can imagine our Northern Friends not figuring this out

 

What Else does one to North of the Border in the Winter ?

 

sorry, forgot   Hockey and Beer

 

as far as I can tell ...

 

I can't speak for all Canuckleheads , but most I know go outside and light up the grill  , instead of grabbing a fry pan because they might need a sweater outside..  :raz:      Seriously though, Grapeseed or Avocado are  best for pan frying in my experience.  

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"Why is the rum always gone?"

Captain Jack Sparrow

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I use a grill pan at very high heat (on the wok burner on my stove top). To cook, put oil (I use grapeseed) onto the room temperature steak rather than onto the pan, add salt. Place steak on extremely hot pan for a few minutes, turn 90 degrees (gives good -looking grill marks). Turn and do same on the other side. Turn off heat. Rest on cake rack on top of pan for about half the cooking time. Serve. 

Nick Reynolds, aka "nickrey"

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My eG Foodblog

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