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Breakfast! 2015


Anna N
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One of the most common breakfasts in Malaysia is Nasi Lemak (rice cooked with coconut milk).  It is normally served with groundnuts, cucumber, chili paste (called sambal in Malay).  Anyone want to try this?

 

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My name is KP Kwan. I am a pharmacist turned restaurateur who lives in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. I have worked in my restaurant more than ten years and since year 2012.

 

I am also a food blogger.  You can read my blog at http://tasteasianfood.com/

I am looking forward to learning and contributing topics about culinary skills in this forum.

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Well here is a picture of the salted quails eggs.

 

Sorry, it isn't that clear, but I couldn't get the angle I needed. No word yet on the process. The supermarket was too busy today for answering stupid foreigners' questions.

 

I managed to get a slightly better picture today. They had turned the bowl around.

 

IMG_0375.jpg

 

So, I bought some. 盐焗鹌鹑蛋 (yán jú ān chún dàn, literally Salt Baked Quail Eggs).

 

sbqe.jpg

 

They taste to me like slighty over-cooked hard-boiled eggs. Getting close to rubbery. No more salty then I would normally eat a boiled egg. I dont really see the point.

But they will do for breakfast tomorrow.

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...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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I managed to get a slightly better picture today. They had turned the bowl around.

 

IMG_0375.jpg

 

So, I bought some. 盐焗鹌鹑蛋 (yán jú ān chún dàn, literally Salt Baked Quail Eggs).

 

sbqe.jpg

 

They taste to me like slighty over-cooked hard-boiled eggs. Getting close to rubbery. No more salty then I would normally eat a boiled egg. I dont really see the point.

But they will do for breakfast tomorrow.

Fascinating. Thanks for sharing. I'm trying to imagine collecting all those quail eggs from all those tiny little quail nests. I assume quail are farmed in China?

 

Thanks for sharing this! I believe I will make a Memphis trip soon to visit the Asian markets and see if I can find quail eggs. If I can dredge up some info on baking them in salt, I might try that.

 

As an aside about cooking eggs in salt -- several years ago I visited Hakone, in Japan, and went to a park where hot mineral springs abound. Eggs are boiled in some of the springs, and sold; to eat one is allegedly to add seven years to your life. (I asked if I could eat 2 and get 14 years; my hosts smiled and said they didn't think so.) The eggs, sold in a small brown paper bag, had completedly blackened shells, which gave me a bit of a pause. However, when peeled, they looked just like a normal hard-boiled egg; when I ate mine, it had a distinct salty taste which I liked a lot. I'd love to go back to Hakone.

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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Grilled bacon, egg and cheese sandwich. I beat the egg and cooked it as if it were a one-egg omelet with no filling; made a suitably flat and cohesive layer for the sandwich. I used American cheese; just seems like one ought not mess with the classics. Grilled it in butter. It is not a low-fat offering, and thus not for everyday consumption, but I felt like a morning treat today.

 

20150423_111216.jpg

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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Soooo  delicious

 

and you melted the cheese !

 

if you have a TJ's near you consider Brie from them   its just cheaper

 

or a brie from somewhere else   get the one w the most fat and oozes of the side

 

you can make this that same day

 

or you can open the brie-ish and let it mature for 3 - x days in your

 

cabinet.

 

delicious it would be    esp aged !

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Unfortunately, my closest TJ's is in Nashville, TN, 3+ hours away. But I'll bear that in mind and perhaps stock up when I go visit my daughter. My local Kroger, one of the new, big ones, does have a respectable selection of cheese, including several bries.

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Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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i get the jones in the 'rolls'  It suits me.  can't say Ive check the sodium, but Ill look the above over next time im at the Super.

 

BTW  JimmyDean is good if you like a lot of grease  

 

:wacko:

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I am highly anxious for the Farmers Market here to open a week from Saturday, so I can get farm-made sausage from my favorite vendor. I can get it in the off-season if I go to their farm, but it's an hour and a half away, in a direction I have no other reason to go, so I have to really get desperate. But man, they make some fine sausage!

Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

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One of the most common breakfast in Malaysia: Fried noodles + coffee or tea.

breakfast-noodles.gif></a></p>

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My name is KP Kwan. I am a pharmacist turned restaurateur who lives in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. I have worked in my restaurant more than ten years and since year 2012.

 

I am also a food blogger.  You can read my blog at http://tasteasianfood.com/

I am looking forward to learning and contributing topics about culinary skills in this forum.

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SD :

 

that looks terrific !

 

not $$$ shot ?  it would have been Highly Rated !

 

 OK with me :

 

I like the Yolks  " whole  Dans Le Mouth "   that's just me

 

Yum !

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So you have to get up early when you have a yen for cheese quesadillas and there are no tortillas in the house. Didn't take long to whip them up and satisfy a craving.

image.jpg

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Anna N,

 

Your cheese quesadillas look like a very satisfying breakfast.

 

Would you be kind enough to share your recipe and method for "whipping up" flour tortillas?

 

The one time I tried it, the result was satisfactory from a recipe and method from the OLD Hillbilly Housewife site (now pretty much defunct), but I really worked hard for them. I had to exert so much effort at the recommended hydration that bench flour was popping up in static electricity as high as my face off of the silicon pastry mat I was rolling them out on. Also they were as good as, but no better then the flour tortillas available from commercial sources.

 

I'd never make that recipe again, but would very much appreciate a recipe that could be "whipped up."  :smile:

> ^ . . ^ <

 

 

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Anna N,

 

Your cheese quesadillas look like a very satisfying breakfast.

 

Would you be kind enough to share your recipe and method for "whipping up" flour tortillas?

 

The one time I tried it, the result was satisfactory from a recipe and method from the OLD Hillbilly Housewife site (now pretty much defunct), but I really worked hard for them. I had to exert so much effort at the recommended hydration that bench flour was popping up in static electricity as high as my face off of the silicon pastry mat I was rolling them out on. Also they were as good as, but no better then the flour tortillas available from commercial sources.

 

I'd never make that recipe again, but would very much appreciate a recipe that could be "whipped up."  :smile:

I don't mind at all sharing what I did but recommend that you look elsewhere for a tortilla recipe that adheres much more closely to the Mexican ideal.

Put 3 cups of all-purpose flour, 1 teaspoon of baking powder, and 1 teaspoon of table salt into the bowl of a stand mixer. Combine for a minute using the dough hook. Combine the water and vegetable oil and add to flour mixture. Knead on medium to low speed for one or two minutes or until a soft, smooth dough forms. Divide into 16 balls, cover with a clean towel and let rest for 15 minutes. On a lightly floured board roll each one to about six or 7 inches. Cook over medium heat in a dry cast iron skillet for one minute or so each side. Stack in a covered bowl until you are ready to use them.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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I don't mind at all sharing what I did but recommend that you look elsewhere for a tortilla recipe that adheres much more closely to the Mexican ideal.

Put 3 cups of all-purpose flour, 1 teaspoon of baking powder, and 1 teaspoon of table salt into the bowl of a stand mixer. Combine for a minute using the dough hook. Combine the water and vegetable oil and add to flour mixture. Knead on medium to low speed for one or two minutes or until a soft, smooth dough forms. Divide into 16 balls, cover with a clean towel and let rest for 15 minutes. On a lightly floured board roll each one to about six or 7 inches. Cook over medium heat in a dry cast iron skillet for one minute or so each side. Stack in a covered bowl until you are ready to use them.

 

Anna N,

 

Thanks for the recipe. How much water and vegetable oil does it call for?

 

Were yours able to be rolled out with a reasonable effort?

> ^ . . ^ <

 

 

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Anna N,

 

Thanks for the recipe. How much water and vegetable oil does it call for?

 

Were yours able to be rolled out with a reasonable effort?

1 cup water and 1/3 cup oil. Quite easy to roll out.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Thanks Anna N,

 

I just wrote it down on old-fashioned loose leaf paper to go into my permanent cookbook. I used to lose recipes every time a computer died. I'm not good at all about electronic backup, so now they go into binders. Some date back to the early 70's and the paper is quite yellowed. This method may not be hip, but it's more reliable for me.

 

Thank you again for sharing your recipe.

> ^ . . ^ <

 

 

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2015_05 Ricotta salata omelet.JPG

 

Here is my "You're not getting that cooking job at Restaurant Daniel" omelet from this morning.  With ricotta salata from Di Palo's. The ricotta salata is a Roman one, with a greenish tinge due to the grass that the sheep graze on - it's amazing, and Di Palo's is still one of my favorite shops anywhere.

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Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

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