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Deryn

Can Sealers

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This discussion was split from the Freeze Driers and Freeze Dried Food topic.

 

I don't have a can sealer. I have long considered buying one but I think the issue for me would be more finding the cans on a regular basis. Right now, I am throwing away (empty #10) cans that I got from LDS for a can sealing 'party' several years ago that never happened because someone broke their 'lend-out' sealer. I didn't have enough (48 I think I had) to justify a sealer. If I were to buy one though, I would get a manual one with at least the possibility to do 2 sizes of cans.


Edited by Mjx Note added. (log)

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I have looked seriously at a can sealer! You can get supplies from a local LDS church if you plug in with them, but in the end (for now) I'm going with mylar because of serving size and use-ability. I saw on a mountain house video that once opened a #10 can of beef has to be used in 5days. So... I want smaller portions so once opened it is in a manageable portion. My machine comes tomorrow, so excited!

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I have looked seriously at a can sealer! You can get supplies from a local LDS church if you plug in with them, but in the end (for now) I'm going with mylar because of serving size and use-ability. I saw on a mountain house video that once opened a #10 can of beef has to be used in 5days. So... I want smaller portions so once opened it is in a manageable portion. My machine comes tomorrow, so excited!

Excited for you! If I needed to use the food up in 5 days, from # 10 can, I would use what I needed and vacuum seal remainder in glass jars. I also use  mylar bags. It just depends on ones needs Happy Freeze Drying! 

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I have a #10 sealer motorized... I promise you, you DON'T want a hand crank one... it takes quit a few revolutions to seal the can properly..."your arms will fall off" from fatigue.

 

Auto sealing is THE way to go.  If you need more info PM me.

 

Mr. Mike

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Mike - Good advice. I guess I had my 'prepper' hat on when I talked about considering a hand crank sealer. However if it is too much like work, perhaps this old lady ought to reconsider an electric one.

 

Someone has now made this its own thread however - so please feel free to tell us more about your particular can sealer/can sealing escapades so we have a reason to be here. :biggrin:


Edited by Deryn (log)

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The brand I have is the All American 8000.  It is motorized, cam operated and seals #10 cans.

 

This is where I ordered it from.

 

http://www.canningpantry.com/electric-can-sealer-8000.html

 

I used a "sem-auto"  sealer in the Y2 days... it was motorized, but you had to hand operated the cam rollers to roll the lip to make the seal.  THAT was hail on the arms with just that manual step.

 

The reason I choose this unit was the robust design, pretty much "full auto" operation.  Set your can after filling with the food item. O2 absorber and lid was in position and then push the "start lever".. lifting the can-pressing start to begin the sealing cycle.  The machine starts rotating, rolling the edge and sealing until the cam stops the action for the cycle..bout 7-10 seconds for a sealing cycle. In theory.. you could crank out 5-7 can/min IF everything was running smoothly... and sometimes it did... but "Murphy's law" was always around.

 

I bought my supplies from the LDS locally.. I'm not an LDS member...just support them by buying their products.

 

To can dry goods efficiently it takes 5-7 people... other wise it's a "herky jerky" process flow.

 

1 person to blow out the cans and load the filling table. and pre-stage food to be poured.

2 people to open bags, pour contents, level material-clean rim, place O2 absorber and set the lid.

1 person to roll seal the cans.

1 person to make labels as needed, label each can of contents and place cans and 1 plastic lid in each box. 6 cans/box.

1 person label box of contents, stack and tape up new boxes.

1 person as a "floater" to help smooth the bottle necks for processing.

Rinse-repeat.

 

There are other items needed .. buss tubs to put the cans into and catch "over flow" as you fill them, a "lip straightener" for slightly bent cans rims,  S. steel tables on rollers for easy positioning as/where needed.  Air compresser-nozzle used to blow out the cans, labels, sharpies; LOTs of sharpies. tape guns-packing tape min. of 2-3 needed for taping up boxes. Anti fatigue mats for those standing in place on concrete.

 

Have to have a truck to get the pallets of cans, lids, O2 absorbers, boxes etc..

Note: a pallet had something like 450 cans per.

 

It took us bout 5-6 hours to go thru 1.5 pallets of cans.. still have some left.

 

Now.. the Money side of things..I thought of a way to "pay" for the machine by sealing the kids gifts up in the can(s). i.e.

 

"Child Proofing Christmas Gifts-Stocking stuffers" 

I was going to get a trailer that could hold 2-3 pallets of cans, the machine, generator for power, processing tables for putting "what ever" the gift needing canned-No raw food items... colored tissue paper, confetti etc in the can and sealing it right there with labels mad up from the customer.

 

8.00 for one can and two for 15 buxs.  The process would take Maaaaby" 3 minutes.. with a helper.. Take money, stage gifts, insert paper-gift seal and then slide the gift for customer pick up..  Think about it.. ..bout 200-300.00 buxs an hour potential in the right location.... OK.. 100.00/hr if it was "slow" 

 

Then you could sell a "P38" the old military can opener that has the "hook" the pierces the lid manually as you rotate it around the rim...just for kicks to watch the kids "struggle" to open THAT present.

 

I always nixed the idea due to "Seasonal outdoor activities" in the fall that took up my weekends.

 

Or one could take things mobile and "rent your canner" to whom ever and set up in their location for a service fee. or what ever..

 

Just my rambling thoughts.

 

Hope this helps..

 

Any questions?

 

Mr. Mike.


Edited by Mr. Mike (log)

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I did a fair bit of canning at an LDS facility in North Carolina so I know how they do it - and yes, it is work that goes fast with a lot of people doing the various jobs - if one has a supply of enough goods ready to put into the cans. That is where I got the (48) can supply that I am now having to throw away - because I moved to Nova Scotia, have no sealer, and though I could buy a can sealer, I fear that where I am getting cans would be a real issue. The closest home storage center (and I am not sure they would sell to me - I am not LDS either) appears to be well over a 1000 miles from me in Toronto. I haven't yet seen any other place to buy them up here.

 

Thanks for the info on which canner you got though. I will remember that if I ever find a can source - it does tempt me. I can retort 'can'. I can freeze-dry. I can dehydrate. I can can conventionally in jars using a pressure canner. I can store in mylar. Using #10s though to 'can' still eludes me (but, I am too old now to bother setting up trailers in my back yard to house them either).


Edited by Deryn (log)

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