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Hummus Forgotten, Now Remembered


rotuts
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Ive forgotten about hummus.

 

i used to make it all the time in the Cuisinart, etc

 

Ive been trying to 'Clean Out' ie Eat a shelf of Fz stuff that's been in my UpRight Freezer

 

mostly SV   all delicious stuff .   still ...

 

I found about 1/2 doz of commercially prepared Hummus.

 

Three Tribe ?

 

no matter.   I resuscitated them, by adding Fresh TJ's kalamata olive oil

 

on my own MachineBread :  1/4 rye, 1/4 whitewholewheat. 1/2 TJ's BreadFlour, salt,yeast,water,vital

 

wheat gluten.

 

Fresh is Best.

 

you know, then a lot of EVVO on the top

 

soooooooooo

 

if youve forgotten about hummus.

 

wake up.

 

I sis.

 

BTW after the Tribes are Done

 

back to the Cuisinart.

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Thanks for those clues on what to do with forgotten hummus. Mine is not forgotten, but is sitting taking up space in the fridge as I try to work out how to liven it up. Spread on bread with more lemon, with more vinegar, with salt, with cumin, with all of the above....it's okay, but not great. I'll try olive oil next.

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get the Hummus 'As you Like It ' if you are not so happy with the Hummus out of the blender ... Olive Oil

 

if you like that  helps out  1 ) initially in the Hummus  then does a Grand Stand on the Plate.

 

its the olive oil  either on the bread you choose or on the plate you serve it on that

 

makes it Spectacular.

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I have improved mine by making freshly roasted nut butters to add to it. A long time ago, I didn't have any tahini so I heated up some sunflower seeds in a pan on the stove and then used my immersion blender to make a smooth butter, it tasted great, so it's now part of my usual procedure in making hummus, and I gave up on buying tahini. If allergies are not an issue, almost any nut (even peanuts) can be roasted and used. The freshly roasted part is really important here, you will be able to taste a difference, there's a big umami flavor boost in the hummus.

 

I think a lot of modern recipes cut way back on the tahini, in an effort to reduce the fat content of the hummus. But, if you're going to add olive oil, IMO, having a healthy nut oil as well isn't a big deal.

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I like to add some spicy (not terribly hot) roasted pepper to hummus.  

The local deli at the middle eastern market sells hummus made in house in varieties with harissa, with olive tapenade plopped in the center (my favorite so far)  and a "spicy red pepper" hummus that is hotter than I like so I get it "half and half" with equal part plain hummus.

They have about 6 varieties - one with an herb mixture that I did not care for but which is very popular.

One with "lemon confit" which I think is a puree made from preserved lemons and doused with green olive oil.  And I mean the olive oil is really green, murky and herbal.

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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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I like mine in a fairly traditional way: chick peas, cumin, garlic, lemon, tahini, salt and olive oil + or - some form of heat. I have played around with the texture. Tried taking the skins off but I found the result way toooooo smooth. Toasted sesame seeds for the tahini component really adds a great flavour. Served with homemade pitas.

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when the hoummus gets kind of stale, my husband likes to eat it on flatbread topped with salsa. TJ's artichoke and red pepper "tapenade" makes a fine topper, also (and the flavor profile meshes better in my opinion). Plus it adds a bit more oil.

"Only dull people are brilliant at breakfast" - Oscar Wilde

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Hummus, even 'Perfect Hummus' is about that additional Olive Oil.

 

it floats on the top of the H.

 

Lots.

 

not Motor Oil from Tunisia via Italy.

 

Kalamata.  Greek. vis Tj's

Edited by rotuts (log)
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Hummus, even 'Perfect Hummus' is about that additional Olive Oil.

 

it floats on the top of the H.

 

Lots.

 

not Motor Oil from Tunisia via Italy.

 

Kalamata.  Greek. vis Tj's

The "green" olive oil at the middle eastern store is Lebanese and is only available in 2-kilo tins - they sell it to people who bring their own bottles.  It is very rich and "buttery" with a slightly bitter undertone that to me is quite pleasant.  I haven't bought any of the oil yet because I have a lot I need to use up before I buy more.  (one of the owners is Lebanese)

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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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I also keep my olive oil in the refrigerator, and then add some to a much smaller plastic bottle which I also keep in the refrigerator.

 

I pull that smaller bottle out, and micro it for 10 - 20 seconds to get it into a slurry, then use that and pot that bottle back

 

into the refig.

 

a million years ago  ( I grew up in Northern CA ) there was a convent in the east bay, near what ever Mission was there.

 

they had Olive Groves and made there on Olive Oil.

 

they sold it by the gallon, until they sold out.  you had to go there.

 

this I also decanted , froze, etc.

 

I loved it.  the story also helped.

 

My sister when there, while I was in the east ( still am ) and sent me 1 x 2 gallons  UPS

 

a long time ago.  I put those 2 gals. in 1 liter plastic very clean bottles and froze them.

 

then dribbled them out for quite some time.

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here is a slice of HomeMade(Machine)Bread and Hummus.

 

for breakfast :

 

Hummus Break.jpg

 

the plastic bottle is the EVOO 'dispenser'

 

from a 'drug' sample.

 

little bottles like this are very hard to come by w the secure top.

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I like mine in a fairly traditional way: chick peas, cumin, garlic, lemon, tahini, salt and olive oil + or - some form of heat. I have played around with the texture. Tried taking the skins off but I found the result way toooooo smooth. Toasted sesame seeds for the tahini component really adds a great flavour. Served with homemade pitas.

 

 

You may not like it too smooth, but in Arab countries, hummus is PERFECTLY smooth, and a bit thinner in consistency than Western-made hummus. That's the way I have to have it!

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My wife loves hummus, so I make her garlic lime and for camp I make a few others like chipotle lime and spinach. And I agree with Rotuts lots of olive oil on top. Crappy photo,sorry.

 

 

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I like mine pretty simple:

Garbanzo garlic lemon salt tahini and extra virgin olive oil. Two keys to the preparation are to blend the garlic tahini and lemon together with the bean liquor first, then add the beans and VERY SLOWLY emulsify the olive oil.

Removing the skins isn't worth the effort in results in my experience.

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