Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

eG Cook-Off #68: Citrus Fruits


David Ross
 Share

Recommended Posts

Had two huge seedless oranges sitting around and decided to try to find a 'whole orange'  cake online.  Discovered Sunset's Whole Orange Cake on Food 52.  Don't have a bundt pan so did it in an angel food pan.  Did not add the glaze.     BUT...this cake is incredible.  Delicious.  Absolutely delicious.   I think we have a new recipe in the repertoire. 

 

Interesting footnote to the recipe.  It came originally from a cake called Kissimmee Orange Cake and it used Florida oranges which have a thinner skin.   I had two very large seedless types so I cut the peel and pith from the one orange which ended up giving me the correct amount of orange to put into the cake. 

 

The bundt pan cake with the decorously draped white glaze would look much prettier, of course. DSC01903.thumb.JPG.773e45db727d51ed37c8a76dc1165b68.JPG

  • Like 3

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here is the recipe https://food52.com/recipes/75095-sunset-s-whole-orange-cake  I am a fan of an olive oil orange cake  I found during a stripped pantry time = like this one. I always have olive oil and citrus "on the hoof" so it is my go to  https://www.splendidtable.org/recipes/california-orange-and-olive-oil-cake

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 9 months later...

My tangerines are a pretty color but suck - as in major mouth pucker. Valencias and kumquats are very late - another month I think. But with an abundance you can play, Sour guys as the acid in a dish. Peel, even before flesh sweet can be great zested in marinades, dressings, braises.  Quick pickled beets and carrots are lovely with some peel. I just use the potato peeler thing and drop in a few. I tend to quickly broil thinner fish fillets and some peel under them, and  squeeze of juice at service - much more than sum of parts. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just thought of the members doing lots out of Vivian Howard's new book which includes a preserved citrus using a mix of citrus. Hope thy share their experiences here. She calls it "Citrus Shrine"

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 1/11/2021 at 4:33 PM, heidih said:

I tend to quickly broil thinner fish fillets and some peel under them, and  squeeze of juice at service - much more than sum of parts. 

ooh!  I'm gonna do that this weekend with these flounder filets I have in my freezer.  

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 3/26/2020 at 4:13 PM, Darienne said:

Had two huge seedless oranges sitting around and decided to try to find a 'whole orange'  cake online.  Discovered Sunset's Whole Orange Cake on Food 52.  Don't have a bundt pan so did it in an angel food pan.  Did not add the glaze.     BUT...this cake is incredible.  Delicious.  Absolutely delicious.   I think we have a new recipe in the repertoire. 

When David picked up this topic again on Monday, I could see my cake just above his post.  So Ed bought me some oranges yesterday, smallish, from Spain, very tasty (which is always a wonderful surprise) and so I'm off to make that cake again.  Maybe I'll add the glaze this time...

  • Like 4

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I had a turkey breast I was going to smoke yesterday, but it was cold and windy and I didn't want to fool with it. So I threw together a sauce with the zest and juice of a Valencia orange, a little sesame oil, a healthy glug or two of tamari, and some gochujang. Meant to put garlic, but forgot it. The turkey breast, one from my local farmer, was boneless and skinless, and had dry-brined for two days. I plopped it in a baking dish, poured the sauce over and around, and baked. 

 

Kids said it was great, and they were glad I'd forgotten the garlic.

 

  • Like 5

Don't ask. Eat it.

www.kayatthekeyboard.wordpress.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I made the citrus and herb baked chicken that has been posted by many others before, forgot how easy and tasty it is, will put it in the regular rotation. I have a couple of pounds of mandarins in the fridge, used some of those. Used sliced shallot instead of onion. Love the citrus slices after they have been baked in the mingled juices, a savory/sweet blend.

  • Like 2

"Only dull people are brilliant at breakfast" - Oscar Wilde

Link to comment
Share on other sites

When you supreme an orange, why is it pronounced as if the word were spelled 'suprem'?

 

Oh, I just supremed an orange for my mid-morning drink.  And later this afternoon, I am going to supreme 3 or 4 blood oranges to make the "Blood Orange Olive Oil Cake'. 

Edited by Darienne (log)
  • Like 1

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 minutes ago, Darienne said:

When you supreme an orange, why is it pronounced as if the word were spelled 'suprem'?

 

 

Because French. Or kitchen French at least, which might not be exactly the same thing.

  • Like 3

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well today's supper cake was finally to be the Blood Orange Olive Oil Cake.  To that end, I attempted to supreme (regular or cooking pronunciation) three blood oranges and made quite a mess of it.  I ended up with a bowl of raggedy pieces and rather more juice than I had thought would be in them and blood orange juice on the counter and walls and the sweater I was wearing and just gave the thing up as a bad job.  Blood orange stains white counters quickly and badly.  I'm not sure about the sweater. 

 

The 'mess' went into the fridge to join tomorrow's mid-morning fruit drink and I made the quick and easy 'Wacky Cake' which Ed loves with Chocolate Ganache topping and went and lay down and read a book.  Well, I'm about to lie down to read a book.  So much for Blood Oranges.

  • Sad 2

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Darienne said:

Well today's supper cake was finally to be the Blood Orange Olive Oil Cake.  To that end, I attempted to supreme (regular or cooking pronunciation) three blood oranges and made quite a mess of it.  I ended up with a bowl of raggedy pieces and rather more juice than I had thought would be in them and blood orange juice on the counter and walls and the sweater I was wearing and just gave the thing up as a bad job.  Blood orange stains white counters quickly and badly.  I'm not sure about the sweater. 

 

The 'mess' went into the fridge to join tomorrow's mid-morning fruit drink and I made the quick and easy 'Wacky Cake' which Ed loves with Chocolate Ganache topping and went and lay down and read a book.  Well, I'm about to lie down to read a book.  So much for Blood Oranges.

Sounds "bloody" frustrating. I am happy with the olive oil orange cake that just uses zest and juice. Blood oranges would lend interesting color. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

24 minutes ago, heidih said:

Sounds "bloody" frustrating. I am happy with the olive oil orange cake that just uses zest and juice. Blood oranges would lend interesting color. 

I should be very happy to have a copy of your recipe, Heidi, if you don't mind.  And thanks. :wub:

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Darienne said:

Well today's supper cake was finally to be the Blood Orange Olive Oil Cake.  To that end, I attempted to supreme (regular or cooking pronunciation) three blood oranges and made quite a mess of it.  I ended up with a bowl of raggedy pieces and rather more juice than I had thought would be in them and blood orange juice on the counter and walls and the sweater I was wearing and just gave the thing up as a bad job....

 

 

Not sure you're in the mood to try again, but I wonder whether you could use a grapefruit knife.

 

 

  • Like 3
Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 minutes ago, MokaPot said:

 

Not sure you're in the mood to try again, but I wonder whether you could use a grapefruit knife.

Good idea, but I no longer have one and I hesitate to ask Ed to try to find me one in Canadian Tire.  But I don't think even that is open for shopping at this point.  It will just have to wait.  

Secondly we live outside a very provincial small Ontario city and only one store is carrying Blood Oranges and I suspect that they will not be there for much longer.  They appeared only two weeks ago to start with. 

  • Like 2

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

Link to comment
Share on other sites

38 minutes ago, Darienne said:

I should be very happy to have a copy of your recipe, Heidi, if you don't mind.  And thanks. :wub:

 

Square 8 x 8 or so pan (I use Pyrex sprayed with cooking spray). 1-1/4 cup flour, 1 tsp. baking powder, 1/2 tsp each salt and baking soda, 3/4 cup sugar, 2 eggs, 1/3 cup olive oil, 1 tsp vanilla, 3 tablespoons orange juice, 1 tablespoon orange zest. A touch of preferred warm spice like cinnamon, ginger or cardamom if desired. Mix by hand till all incorporated - don't overdo it. Not a super moist cake; ages well though. My Pyrex dish has a lid so I store it there at room temp.  350 degrees C for 25 to 30 minutes. Welcome anytime with tea or coffee. Bit of whipped cream wouldn't hurt. 

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, heidih said:

 

Square 8 x 8 or so pan (I use Pyrex sprayed with cooking spray). 1-1/4 cup flour, 1 tsp. baking powder, 1/2 tsp each salt and baking soda, 3/4 cup sugar, 2 eggs, 1/3 cup olive oil, 1 tsp vanilla, 3 tablespoons orange juice, 1 tablespoon orange zest. A touch of preferred warm spice like cinnamon, ginger or cardamom if desired. Mix by hand till all incorporated - don't overdo it. Not a super moist cake; ages well though. My Pyrex dish has a lid so I store it there at room temp.  350 degrees C for 25 to 30 minutes. Welcome anytime with tea or coffee. Bit of whipped cream wouldn't hurt. 

Many thanks.

 

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Update to the blood orange situation.  

 

Ed had purchased have a dozen blood oranges, 3 of which were to go into the cake.  Quite by accident, apparently, I picked the wrong three.  As reported earlier, I could not separate the orange segments, also known as 'supremes', from the peel and made quite a mess.

 

Well, the remaining 3 oranges were easily supremes, with mess, and had they been picked first, we would have had a lovely Blood Orange Olive Oil cake.  

 

Today Ed is buying a few regular seedless navel oranges and we'll have the familiar Sunset Whole Orange Cake and I'll make more glaze than is called for which will make Ed happy.

  • Like 4

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By David Ross
      When I think of Potato Salad, I think of my mother and paternal grandmother.  Summer picnics and backyard parties are the first memories that come to mind.  But I came to realize that not all potato salads are the same.  My grandmother kept her recipe basically the same.  Usually russet potatoes off the ranch and farm she and my grandfather owned in Central Oregon.  She would add mayonnaise, out West "Best Foods" was her mayonnaise of choice if she didn't make it from scratch.  She would add a bit of yellow mustard, some vinegar and chopped canned pimentos. (Today we'd do something she would have called "fancy" and add fire-roasted red peppers).  Sometimes Grandma would add chopped, hard-boiled eggs to her potato salad. 
       
      My mother was more adventuresome with her potato salads.  She usually used Russets since she grew up in Idaho potato country and my grandfather had a small business that sold burlap sacks to potato farmers.  On occasion she would use "new potatoes," either red or white.  We didn't have potatoes called "baby" or "fingerlings" back then.  Sometimes she added chopped dill pickle, hard-boiled eggs or diced celery.  If my father had his way, she would make his potato salad with Miracle Whip.  I wouldn't touch the Miracle Whip potato salad. 
       
      One thing my mother and grandmother always agreed upon was the potato salad had to be on ice in the metal ice chest so the mayonnaise wouldn't spoil and make us all sick at the picnic.  
       
      Mother didn't limit her potato salad cookery to the summer months. In Fall and Winter she made a hot German potato salad and served it with sauerkraut and German sausage we bought from a German butcher in a small farming town. 
       
      She boiled russet potatoes and cut them into thick slices.  The dressing was made by frying bacon, then draining the bacon and crumbling it into bits.  Into the skillet with hot bacon grease she added onions and apple cider vinegar and tossed the potatoes with the hot dressing. Instead of diced celery she seasoned the salad with celery seeds and lots of cracked black pepper. 
       
      It seems as though potato salads are uniquely tied to family, yet cross borders in terms of variations and ingredients.  Let's join together and share our family memories, present old favorites and create some new variations of potato salad.
       
      See the complete eG Cook-Off Index here: https://forums.egullet.org/topic/143994-egullet-recipe-cook-off-index/
       
    • By Chris Amirault
      Every now and then since December 2004, a good number of us have been getting together at the eGullet Recipe Cook-Off. Click here for the Cook-Off index.
      For our sixth Cook-Off, we're going to be making pad thai. You've surely eaten this Thai restaurant staple dozens of times, marvelling at the sweet, sour, hot, and salty marriage on your plate. There are lots of variations of pad thai floating around the internet, including one by mamster at the eGCI Thai Cooking course. While there is one ingredient -- rice noodles -- that may be hard for some to find, most ingredients or substitutes are available at your local grocer. And, if you're new to Thai cooking, isn't now a good time to get your first bottle of fish sauce or block of tamarind?
      In addition to the course, here are a few threads to get us started:
      The excellent Thai cooking at home thread discusses pad thai in several spots.
      A brief thread on making pad thai, and one on vegetarian pad thai.
      For the adventurous, here is a thread on making fresh rice noodles.
      Finally, a few folks mention pad thai in the "Culinary Nemesis" thread. Fifi, snowangel, and Susan in FL all mention in the fried chicken thread that pad thai is also a culinary nemesis of theirs. So, in true cook-off style, hopefully we can all share some tips, insights, recipes, and photos of the results!
      I'll start by asking: does anyone know any good mail-order purveyors for folks who can't purchase rice noodles at their local Asian food store?
    • By Chris Amirault
      Every now and then since December 2004, a good number of us have been getting together at the eGullet Recipe Cook-Off. Click here for the Cook-Off index.
      For our thirteenth Cook-Off, we're making fresh and stuffed Italian pastas, including gnocchi. I would take a bit here and try to say some intelligent things about pasta in general, but I'm very happy to defer to my betters in the eGullet Society's Culinary Institute! Check out Adam Balic's Pasta around the Mediterranean course here, and click here for and the associated Q&A thread. In addition, Moby Pomerance has three eGCI courses: the first on stuffed pastas in general (Q&A here), and the other two on Tortelli, Ravioli & Cappelletti and Pansotti, Tortelloni and Raviolo.
      Of course, there are also lots of other related threads, including several on gnocchi like this one, this one, and this one; a few fresh pasta threads here, here and here; and a thread on pasta machines.
      So break out your Atlas hand-cranked machine (or, if you're like me, start to justify buying that KitchenAid mixer pasta attachment!), dice up a few heirloom tomatoes, and start cooking! No machine? Then you're on tap for gnocchi, my friend!
    • By Chris Amirault
      Welcome to eGullet Cook-Off XLIV! Click here for the Cook-Off index.
      We've just devoted a Cook-Off to braised brisket, and we're turning again to moist, well-cooked proteins for our next adventure: ossobuco. You will see it spelled a number of different ways out there, but Marcella Hazan refers to it as one word in her definitive Essentials of Classic Italian Cooking, so I'm going with that spelling. No reason to argue with Marcella, after all.
      Ossobuco is braised veal shank, named after the "bone with a hole" that used to be attached to the hind shank of a calf. (Let's all agree to stick to veal, and not have, say, halibut ossobuco. ) The classic Milanese version includes vegetables, tomatoes, wine, and broth, and is served with risotto alla milanese, perfumed with saffron, and with gremolada.
      Some of the versions out there are a bit wacky. In particular, The Silver Spoon Cookbook simmers the 2" thick shanks for 30 minutes atop the stove. Given that Hazan has 1 1/2" shanks in a 350F oven for two hours, I'm pretty sure the SSC is a waste of good veal. Indeed, I'd think that a much lower oven for longer would work wonders.
      There are more things to talk about here than just braising temps and times! For example, many other versions of ossobuco depart from the Milanese approach. In her out-of-print More Classic Italian Cooking, Hazan provides the recipe for Ossobuchi in Bianco, the white referring to a sauce lacking tomato. In The Fine Art of Italian Cooking, Giuliano Bugialli offers ossobuco Florentine style, with peas and pancetta, and Lynne Rossetto Kasper's Italian Country Table offers a home-style version with mushrooms, favas or snap peas, and more intense flavors such as anchovy, sage, and rosemary.
      We have one short discussion of ossobuco here, and an even shorter one on wine pairings here. Indeed, as is often the case with Italian food, the best discussion is the one shepherded by Kevin72, the Cooking and Cuisine of Lombardia, which muses on on the dish's origins and execution throughout.
      I'm wondering a few things myself. Some folks say that braised veal cannot be reheated, unlike other dishes that benefit from a night in the fridge. I'm also wondering what other sorts of sides -- polenta, say, or the Italian mashed potatoes that Hazan suggests for the ossobuchi in bianco -- would work and/or are traditional.
      So who wants to welcome the new year with some bones with holes?
    • By Chris Amirault
      Every now and then since December 2004, a good number of us have been getting together at the eGullet Recipe Cook-Off. Click here for the Cook-Off index.
      For our third Cook-Off, we've chosen Indian lamb curry. Yes, it's true: that's a huge category for a cook-off, and saying "Indian" is about as stupidly broad as saying "American." However, like gumbo, there are some basic elements to most of the many, many permutations of this dish, and several cook-off participants wanted to start cooking Indian at home with several options.
      So, instead of choosing a specific lamb curry, I thought that having a conversation about those different permutations (like the gumbo okra/roux discussion, say) would be interesting and fun. I also wanted to avoid too particular ingredients that some of our cook-off pals can't get in certain places.
      A few things that we can discuss, photograph, and share include:
      -- the spice mixture: If you've never toasted your own spices, then you have a world of aromatic wonder ahead. I'm sure many people can share their ingredients, ratios, and toasting tips for curry powders that will blow away the garbage in your grocery's "spice" aisle. We can also have the ground vs. whole debate, if there are takers!
      -- the paste: many curry dishes involve frying a blended paste of onion, garlic, and/or ginger, along with the spices, in oil or ghee (clarified butter). I found that learning how to cook that paste -- which requires the same sort of patience demanded by roux -- was the key to making a deep, rich curry.
      -- accompaniments: rice dishes or bread (I have a pretty good naan recipe that I'd be glad to try out again).
      Here are a couple of related eGullet threads:
      lamb kangari
      a lamb and goat thread
      If anyone finds more, post 'em!
      So: find yourself a leg of lamb to bone, sharpen your knives, and get ready to update your spice drawer!
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...