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Anna N

Your Daily Sweets: What Are You Making and Baking? (2015)

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cyalexa – the recipe is similar, but they are dehydrated (or roasted at a VERY low temp) after three days of simmering: http://www.recipecircus.com/recipes/Kimberlyn/FRUIT/Lenas_Candied_Figs.html

 

 

 

Bookmarked, thanks. I'll probably try that. I am also going drying in a Nu-wave oven. It's too cumbersome to use for cooking but I think it will dry figs very effectively. 

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I made these this past weekend...Kim Shook's "Dream Cookies" recipe. I used Cinnamon chips in the batch on the left and used Nestles Mini semi-sweet chocolate chips in the second batch on the right.

Cookies.jpg

The Cinnamon chip version, still warm from the oven, tasted just like coffee cake! :wub:  I was able to find the Cinnamon chips at my local Walmart Neighborhood Grocery store. The next day, both versions of the cookie were still crisp.

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""  The Cinnamon chip version, still warm from the oven, tasted just like coffee cake! ""

 

:wub:   you bet.

 

I see more weight gain coming soon.

 

:sad: 

 

if you are near a TJ's  I use their Choc.Chips.  they now have Choc.Chunks  that's possibly made with the same chocolate.

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Toliver - those look so good.  I'm going to search out some cinnamon chips and make those soon.  I haven't made them that way in ages.  They really are our family cooky.  Not necessarily what we want all the time, but if we were asked to choose, they'd be our favorite!  Glad you liked them.

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Friend asked me to attempt this recipe with its soy sauce variation.

image.jpg

image.jpg

So a couple of days ago I attempted the version without the soy sauce. As you can see from the photographs it appeared I was about to have a most ungodly mess. I stopped the experiment at this point and managed to reach Kerry Beal at work for her advice. The advice was totally counterintuitive. Increase the speed of the Thermomix. I was wishing I had a full hazmat suit but I am trusting and followed the advice and the erupting volcano calmed down.

image.jpg

Eventually we had dulce de leche.

image.jpg

Having spent the morning wiping DDL from every surface in my kitchen, before I tried the one with soy sauce I used my microwave cover to contain the splashes!

image.jpg

Voila! DDL with soy sauce. An interesting, complex flavor with some umami and salt.

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These are on the periphery of "sweets" by some definitions.  Actually scones are usually considered sweet so this post is going here. 

 

I had a brainstorm this morning - a good one - and I'm passing it on to you.

 

I was mixing a batch of scones - the extremely easy ones that are made with SELF-RISING FLOUR (or SELF-RAISING Flour if you are in the UK) and heavy cream plus a little sugar - not much, scones should not be sweet like cake.  

 

For this batch I decided to splurge a bit and added a couple of eggs and a little vanilla extract and about a tablespoon of oil (my preference is rice bran oil but any neutral vegetable oil will do) to make them a bit more tender.

 

The basic recipe is the same as my BISCUITS! recipe,

 

1 cup heavy cream

2 cups self-rising flour  (it should be fresh - after several months the baking powder tends to lose strength but you can add some yourself)

 

For scones with just a hint of sweetness, add a 1/4 cup of sugar

 

1 teaspoon vanilla extract (or other flavor - almond, lemon or orange - with some of the zest grated from the rind) 

1 Tablespoon vegetable oil

 

2 eggs.

 

Measure out everything.

 

In a medium-sized mixing bowl, pour the

cream,  add the 

eggs and the 

oil

 

beat with a whisk to combine

 

add the sugar and vanilla and beat.

 

Add one cup of the flour and beat just until it is completely incorporated

add half of the remaining cup and beat until it looks like thick batter

 

It should hold its shape when mounded up.  If not add a little more flour, stir to combine

and add more if it still seems too soft.

 

Usually at this point we turn the dough out onto a board and knead a bit more flour into it, cut into rounds and bake in the oven.

NOT TODAY, Today I am making waffles from this dough.

 

 

VARIATIONS:  At this point you can add dried fruits - cranberries, raisins, chopped apricots, dates, figs, etc., to the dough, mixing well.

You can also substitute up to 1/3 the amount of flour with almond flour, other nut flours, coconut flour, and the various "exotic" flours that have become popular in the past few years.  Sorghum flour (Bob's Red Mill sweet white is excellent) is somewhat sweet so cut the sugar by half if using it.  You can add finely chopped nuts or thinly sliced almonds but anything in larger chunks tends to stick between the bumps on the grid and pull the waffle apart when the top is opened.  (I have experienced this so I know what happens).

 

 

My waffle iron is a "vintage" one that has the bare metal grids that need periodic "oiling" and I use the spray stuff.

It's a regular waffle iron, I don't care for the Belgian type.  And with this treatment, it is virtually non-stick.  

 

I used a "disher" or ice cream scoop - a large one but a serving spoon will work.  The one pictured is a Size 8 - holds 4 ounces to the rim, obviously with the dough mounded up, there is probably 6 ounces in each scoop that goes onto the waffler.

HPIM8026.JPG

 

The waffle when first turned on (Med/Hot) takes a while to heat up but once hot, stays so until turned off.

Yours may heat faster - and there should be a signal to show when it is hot.

 

I set my digital timer for 5 minutes.

 

When the light on the wafflers goes out - that signals it is hot.

I spray both grids - just roughly in the center ALWAYS spray oil when hot - 

 

apply the dough to the center and close the iron and start the timer.

HPIM8027.JPG

As soon as it sounds I open the waffler, remove the waffle with tongs to a cooling rack (so they will stay crisp)

HPIM8025.JPG

I give both grids a quick oil spritz and apply another batch of dough.

 

And so on until all the dough has been waffled...

The following photo shows one with dried cranberries stirred into the batter.

HPIM8028.JPG

 

The little "pockets" in these waffle scones are prefect for holding additions such as clotted cream, jam or jelly, whipped butter with honey or maple syrup or whatever you fancy.  

 

And, when completely cool, they can be closed in a zip lock bag and refrigerated for a couple of days or frozen up to four or five weeks and reheated in your toaster or toaster oven.  

ENJOY!

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These are on the periphery of "sweets" by some definitions.  Actually scones are usually considered sweet so this post is going here. 

 

I had a brainstorm this morning - a good one - and I'm passing it on to you.

 

I was mixing a batch of scones - the extremely easy ones that are made with SELF-RISING FLOUR (or SELF-RAISING Flour if you are in the UK) and heavy cream plus a little sugar - not much, scones should not be sweet like cake.  

 

For this batch I decided to splurge a bit and added a couple of eggs and a little vanilla extract and about a tablespoon of oil (my preference is rice bran oil but any neutral vegetable oil will do) to make them a bit more tender.

 

The basic recipe is the same as my BISCUITS! recipe,

 

1 cup heavy cream

2 cups self-rising flour  (it should be fresh - after several months the baking powder tends to lose strength but you can add some yourself)

 

For scones with just a hint of sweetness, add a 1/4 cup of sugar

 

1 teaspoon vanilla extract (or other flavor - almond, lemon or orange - with some of the zest grated from the rind) 

1 Tablespoon vegetable oil

 

2 eggs.

 

Measure out everything.

 

In a medium-sized mixing bowl, pour the

cream,  add the 

eggs and the 

oil

 

beat with a whisk to combine

 

add the sugar and vanilla and beat.

 

Add one cup of the flour and beat just until it is completely incorporated

add half of the remaining cup and beat until it looks like thick batter

 

It should hold its shape when mounded up.  If not add a little more flour, stir to combine

and add more if it still seems too soft.

 

Usually at this point we turn the dough out onto a board and knead a bit more flour into it, cut into rounds and bake in the oven.

NOT TODAY, Today I am making waffles from this dough.

 

 

VARIATIONS:  At this point you can add dried fruits - cranberries, raisins, chopped apricots, dates, figs, etc., to the dough, mixing well.

You can also substitute up to 1/3 the amount of flour with almond flour, other nut flours, coconut flour, and the various "exotic" flours that have become popular in the past few years.  Sorghum flour (Bob's Red Mill sweet white is excellent) is somewhat sweet so cut the sugar by half if using it.  You can add finely chopped nuts or thinly sliced almonds but anything in larger chunks tends to stick between the bumps on the grid and pull the waffle apart when the top is opened.  (I have experienced this so I know what happens).

 

 

My waffle iron is a "vintage" one that has the bare metal grids that need periodic "oiling" and I use the spray stuff.

It's a regular waffle iron, I don't care for the Belgian type.  And with this treatment, it is virtually non-stick.  

 

I used a "disher" or ice cream scoop - a large one but a serving spoon will work.  The one pictured is a Size 8 - holds 4 ounces to the rim, obviously with the dough mounded up, there is probably 6 ounces in each scoop that goes onto the waffler.

attachicon.gifHPIM8026.JPG

 

The waffle when first turned on (Med/Hot) takes a while to heat up but once hot, stays so until turned off.

Yours may heat faster - and there should be a signal to show when it is hot.

 

I set my digital timer for 5 minutes.

 

When the light on the wafflers goes out - that signals it is hot.

I spray both grids - just roughly in the center ALWAYS spray oil when hot - 

 

apply the dough to the center and close the iron and start the timer.

attachicon.gifHPIM8027.JPG

As soon as it sounds I open the waffler, remove the waffle with tongs to a cooling rack (so they will stay crisp)

attachicon.gifHPIM8025.JPG

I give both grids a quick oil spritz and apply another batch of dough.

 

And so on until all the dough has been waffled...

The following photo shows one with dried cranberries stirred into the batter.

attachicon.gifHPIM8028.JPG

 

The little "pockets" in these waffle scones are prefect for holding additions such as clotted cream, jam or jelly, whipped butter with honey or maple syrup or whatever you fancy.  

 

And, when completely cool, they can be closed in a zip lock bag and refrigerated for a couple of days or frozen up to four or five weeks and reheated in your toaster or toaster oven.  

ENJOY!

We shall name them Andie's Scwafflles - they will be bigger than Cronuts!

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A neighbor came over this afternoon to borrow some eggs and I "forced" one on her along with a cup of tea.  "OMG, OMG, OMG" this is fantastic."  And that was just one at room temp.  

I printed out the recipe for her.  She has to buy self-rising flour and heavy cream but has a waffle iron (purchased from me last year).

 

Even my dog is nuts about them - did not give him any with cranberries.  

 

 

Another thing I tried "waffled"  a few days ago was some salt-rising bread that I had baked, sliced and froze a few weeks ago.

It was not turning out well in the toaster so I heated up the waffle iron - cut off the crusts, just in case they would be too hard and banged them into the iron.

Super tasty, crunchy and with all those handy little pockets to catch the butter...


Edited by andiesenji (log)
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well this is a new thread for me to post in .

 

its a bit sweet, mostly it a desert :

 

these are previously carefully toasted TJ's walnuts

 

some SilverGoat cheese also from TJ's and some of Tj's Agave syrup.

 

everything makes this dish

 

the nuts were very fresh and carefully toasted.  the3y were cooled an placed in a clean

 

Mayo Jar  ( I have many )

 

Its difficult for me to tell you what makes these nuts so good :

 

a million years ago, very early '60s  we got from time to time some macadamian nuts from hawaii 

 

fresh off the United Flight.

 

they had a clean but rich nutty flavor, but very very rich flavor.

 

these walnuts have a bit of that.  rich rich rich.

 

the goat cheese was at room temp and the the nuts

 

( which surprising to me kept quite well in the Sealed Mayo Jar  no loss as I could taste )

 

sprinked on w the agave syrup.

 

what a surprise   

 

i had seconds.

 

all more or less treated well from Tj 's !

 

of course, a tiny bit of green might be nice ?

 

mint ?

 

I'm going to have thirds.

 

no mint do i have.

nuts goat.jpg


Edited by rotuts (log)
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I do hope i can get across the clean, light , mild , but light nutty fattiness of these  nuts.

 

its very new to me.

 

Ill try my favorite nut :  the Tj's Pecan.

 

see it it can do this.

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I have missed baking so much I made brioche and froze it today after I chipped about 1/4 the tiles off the kitchen walls …oy

 

 

then I really was wanting dessert! So I remembered seeing a recipe for macaroons you can make in the dehydrator! YAY Excalibur! 

 

I found a recipe online but only had a whole coconut on hand and they all called for dry flaked…and had agave and I really do not like agave but Rotuts you make it look good! and then figured "how hard can this be using fresh instead of dried ???"  so I cracked drained and gutted the coconut  and put the meat in a food processor and then turned it into butter added dates and pecans and some other dried fruit I found … bit of vanilla,  cinnamon,  salt and honey then used a scoop to put them on the dehydrator trays and went to run errands ..when I came back they were done and amazing with coffee when they cooled so

 

I did not measure I just dumped and really no need to measure with this stuff it is all sticky you just need to have the coconut macerated to butter is the only trick on the texture I think ? I used the whole coconut it came out to about 2 cups plus ..and I added maybe I cup of dates … but there are several recipes online for this kind of thing..I am sure someone here has made these before? They are new to me! 

 

and with no oven totally nice with coffee and I had the feeling of making the brioche with the smell of the dough 

 

/21484383612_02b27de55a.jpg

I have a body fat testing next Thursday  (Bod Pod ..a giant egg of truth I have to get in .. I belong to an Army wellness program and they are pretty revealing) and really did not need to eat whatever I was wanting to make with the brioche anyway ! 


Edited by hummingbirdkiss (log)
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Seems like it's now autumn, so I had a go at making an apple tart. 

 

Tarte à la pomme.jpg

 

Flapjack base

Apple and citrus tajine

Granny Smith curd

Toasted oats

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that apple tart with granny smith curd? wow!!!  looks amazing and sounds even better

 

I had SOOO MANY duck eggs it was time to make a panda  honeycomb cake and this you can do on the grill for sure so I did ..the honeycomb is not great looking I like it when they are super deep …but this tastes as good as any I have baked indoors..I was starting to tweak from lack of backing and was going to sneak in my kids house while they were gone and use the oven …but these took the edge off…

 

I know you guys understand I used up 13 eggs and made breakfast for a few days! 

 

 /21581163841_9a136b589f.jpgso disappointed in the lack of honey comb ..you can feel the correct texture to it when you bite.. it but the looks are not there ..must be the temp of the grill huh and the little pig running back and forth just out of reach while I bake in the yard this morning ..(it was cute for a while but not fun now ) ?  everything else was the same as when  I bake it in the oven 


Edited by hummingbirdkiss (log)
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First of the season Apple Tarte Tatin.  This year I used golden delicious apples.  Used unsalted butter and sugar to make the base for the caramel, then the apples, then into a 375 oven for 1 1/2 hours.  Let it refrigerate overnight, then on day two sprinkled sea salt over the apples and the caramel juices that had cooked down.  Pastry on top, in a 400 oven for 30 minutes and voila.  This was the deepest, sweetest most delicious Tarte Tatin I've made. 

 

IMG_0974.JPG

 

IMG_0981.JPG

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IMAG1775.jpg

 

The legendary Pierre Herme Nutella-tart. I have strange colleagues - they did not finish it, so I had to take leftovers home. That's a first.

 

 

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The legendary Pierre Herme Nutella-tart. I have strange colleagues - they did not finish it, so I had to take leftovers home. That's a first.

 

It looks good.  Is it just Nutella in pastry?  If so, I could understand only eating a little...

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It looks good.  Is it just Nutella in pastry?  If so, I could understand only eating a little...

It is a prebaked sweet pastry shell, a layer of nutella and a thick layer of baked chocolate filling (chocolate, sugar, eggs, butter), sprinkled with nuts. The nutella comes through surprisingly strongly

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Everyone's baked goods look fabulous!

 

Here is one of two trays I made for a baby shower this weekend. I don't think most people would believe it took me a solid week to get these done (I had chocolate favors to do also..)! Trays included two kinds of shortbread, red velvet whoopie pies, chocolate dipped brownies, and mini tarts. Thanks for looking!

Ruth

showerpastry.jpg

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You are more than welcome.  Yes, I believe it took a week.  No problem.  Lovely. 

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I borrowed my son's oven to bake these 

 

it had to be done I had to remind myself why I am persevering on this kitchen 

 

 

/21673923692_b058220b62.jpgthese were really good sticky buns 

 

fortified and back to work 

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Sticky buns ( w pecans ) are one of my favorite things.

 

yours look superb.

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Hummingbirdkiss, that looks really good! I wish I has something like that tomorrow for breakfast.

You, mentioning being without oven, reminded me of fornetto estense or fornetto versilia, sorry, it's a pain to add links with iPad. Is there anything similar in the US?


Edited by Franci (log)
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Hummingbirdkiss, that looks really good! I wish I has something like that tomorrow for breakfast.

You, mentioning being without oven, reminded me of fornetto estense or fornetto versilia, sorry, it's a pain to add links with iPad. Is there anything similar in the US?

I just looked it up I have no idea but it looks like something I would like to try cooking in thanks Franci! 

 

thanks for the complements a great sweet dough one of my first "big" deals when I was first in my own kitchen ..to this day it is still just as fun making them 

 

thanks Rotuts! they were as good as they looked I could pretend and be humble but damn they were every bite what they look like even in that crappo photo! 

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