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seabream

Stove-Top Finishing of Fish Cooked Sous Vide

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Replying to some of the last few comments: 

 

I am using avocado oil, which works up to 500F. I try to keep the oil as hot as possible without actually reaching 500F. If I keep it in the 400Fs, I can achieve a really nice brown surface in 30 seconds or so (except some bits of fish stick to the pan).

 

True, no fish *needs* sous vide. In fact, I prefer to pan-fry thinner fish such as trout, and I can achieve a nice golden crust without sticking. But I think that thicker fish benefits from sous viding followed by a quick sear. The interior stays more moist, and the browning is still there.

 

I have tried to use a torch to brown the fish, but it didn't work for me. Instead of the nice golden crust that I'm looking for, I got black bits scattered throughout the top of the fish. This may be a problem with my technique, but I'm hesitant to try it again until I understand what I should be doing differently. 

 

It seems like opinions about the Green Pan are polarized. They're so cheap that I'm tempted to buy a set just to form my own opinion. I like the fact that they are safe to accidental heating up to 850F.

LeCreuset contains PFOA, so they are out for me. Calphalon and Swiss Diamond contain PTFE but no PFOA, so they are still an option. They both say that they are safe to 500F, above that temperature the non-stick surface will likely start peeling.

 

So many options to consider. Thank you everyone for sharing your experience.

Here's a link to one of the reviews of the LIMA green pans.

 

As I said in an earlier post, there are some "green" pans that are crap.  They don't perform as advertised.  I got one because my daughter bought one of this brand and had excellent results with it so I decided to give one a try - I also had a coupon for BB&B, which reduced the price even more.

 

I have numerous pans and didn't "need" this but I love to try new things.    Look for the discount coupons here  worth the small amount of effort required.


"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Has this ceramic stuff been applied to cast iron successfully?  I had a Le Creuset frying pan with a nonstick surface on it.  Was absolutely fantastic for certain applications.  Nonstick failed, and LC dropped the product line and sent a much less useful replacement.  Having huge thermal mass and nonstick at the same time would let me get back into making crispy cheese shelled souffle omelets again...


Christopher D. Holst aka "cdh"

Learn to brew beer with my eGCI course

Chris Holst, Attorney-at-Lunch

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When I want extreme high heat quick, I use the broiler.

 

Totally non-stick.

 

dcarch

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When I want extreme high heat quick, I use the broiler.

Totally non-stick.

dcarch

And this is were a handheld broiler, aka the Searzal may come in handy

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I wonder if you could use a technique similar to what Alton Brown uses for porterhouse steaks where you put a chimney of coals above the protein to mimic a salamander.

Also, you should consider the technique that Modernist Cuisine uses of putting a cold liquid filled pan of fish under the broiler to cook it. The broiler crisps the top while the liquid slowly brings the fish up to an even temp.

In both cases, you're trying to replace contact cooking with non-contact cooking in a way that gets you crisp skin without overcooking the fish.


PS: I am a guy.

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Thanks for the comment on the Searzal, and for thinking outside the box. That will totally fix my problem, especially because I already have the Bernzomatic TS8000. I need one! :) I have a MAP cylinder right now - it seems like I need to get a Propane cylinder to go with the Searzal?

Any other tricks that will fix my problem in different ways?

 

I did a bit more reading on the green pans, and found the following in their docs:

***

Note: after a while, there is a natural reduction of the non-stick properties. This process

is accelerated by prolonged exposure of the non-stick surface to high heat during cooking

due to carbonization of food and oil.

•           The patented ThermolonTM non-stick technology can withstand accidental over-heating up to 450°C/850°F for

short periods, which is a safety feature. This means that if the pan is accidentally overheated, no toxic fumes

will be released. In addition, the coating itself will not blister or peel.

***

 

So, I'm wondering if this explains the mixed reviews. 

andiesenji - do you use your green pan on high heat on a regular basis?

pbear, TicTac, and anyone else who doesn't like them - same question for you.

 

I ask this because my only reason for getting this pan would be to use on high heat. I already have a Teflon-style pan that I can use for eggs and other foods that do well on low to medium heat, and it works great. So if I get a green pan, it would only get used on high heat, every single time. 

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The coal chimney and cold liquid techniques are very interesting. The coal chimney trick is new to me, but the cold liquid technique is something that I've been meaning to experiment with for a while. 

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The coal chimney and cold liquid techniques are very interesting. The coal chimney trick is new to me, but the cold liquid technique is something that I've been meaning to experiment with for a while. 

 

I don't know if you like ash on your steak with the chimney method.

 

dcarch

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well not to get off track .....

 

I did the exact AltonBrown

 

charcoal up / down broiler  twice when the show came out.

 

real Prime back in those day.

 

it works as he says it does.

 

the ash and there is a bit, just blows right off.

 

best steak I ever had.

 

starting with a real prime item.

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Thanks for the comment on the Searzal, and for thinking outside the box. That will totally fix my problem, especially because I already have the Bernzomatic TS8000. I need one! :) I have a MAP cylinder right now - it seems like I need to get a Propane cylinder to go with the Searzal?

Any other tricks that will fix my problem in different ways?

 

I did a bit more reading on the green pans, and found the following in their docs:

***

Note: after a while, there is a natural reduction of the non-stick properties. This process

is accelerated by prolonged exposure of the non-stick surface to high heat during cooking

due to carbonization of food and oil.

•           The patented ThermolonTM non-stick technology can withstand accidental over-heating up to 450°C/850°F for

short periods, which is a safety feature. This means that if the pan is accidentally overheated, no toxic fumes

will be released. In addition, the coating itself will not blister or peel.

***

 

So, I'm wondering if this explains the mixed reviews. 

andiesenji - do you use your green pan on high heat on a regular basis?

pbear, TicTac, and anyone else who doesn't like them - same question for you.

 

I ask this because my only reason for getting this pan would be to use on high heat. I already have a Teflon-style pan that I can use for eggs and other foods that do well on low to medium heat, and it works great. So if I get a green pan, it would only get used on high heat, every single time. 

I generally only use the pan on high heat for certain applications.  I have many other pans for other purposes.  I probably don't use it as much as many do as I live along and cook mostly for myself.  Some fatty meats that have already been "cooked" - such as ham - but need quick finishing without further cooking (which tends to make ham rubbery) needs to be quickly seared and that is what I do most often in the pan without any oil.  I heat the pan until a drop of water litteraly explodes when it hits the surface, slap on the ham steak, wait till it "releases" after less than a minute, flip it over and leave it for another minute.  It takes just a tad longer for the second side to sear because the steak causes a bit of cooling of the surface. 

Then I reduce the heat, wait a few minutes and cook my eggs.  It doesn't take long to get the "feel" of the pan. 

And, unlike most non-stick pans, there will be fond development with meats, etc.


"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Sitram, a French company, had a line called Cybernox. I don't know why it went out of production but it was good to 1800 degrees. It was also nearly indestructable (except in the hands of my wife ;-( ;-( ;-( .)

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One of my favorite pans is Sitram Cybernox.  I use it primarily for egg cookery and for searing steaks and other meat.  I sure wish I'd gotten more when they were still around.  Mine has stood up to years of use, and they are also rated NSF.

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