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Anna N

Dinner 2014 (Part 7)

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Phở đặc biệt chez huiray tonight.

 

Bánh phở, shaved ribeye (raw, semi-cooked by hot broth), oxtail meat, omasum tripe, sliced beef tendon, residual bone marrow plugs, chopped scallions, phở broth.
 
Rau húng quế ("Thai basil"), ngò gai (culantro), ngò (coriander leaves/cilantro), lime wedges (cut SE Asian style), mung bean sprouts.
 
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In process:
 
Beef tendon, after cooking in the broth.
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Finished broth, in the pot, before fishing out solids (tendons already removed) and filtering through cheesecloth.  (Beef bones w/ marrow, oxtail, both blanched before the stock proper ("fei sui"); charred shallots & ginger, star anise pods, cloves, stick cassia, black cardamom, coriander seeds, fish sauce, rock sugar.)
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Omasum tripe, after cooking separately in salted water plus some of the broth plus a couple of the ginger pieces.
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Oxtail meat, deboned, recovered from the finished broth.
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Here are some dinners we have had recently.

 

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Swedish meatloaf with lingon preserve, gravy, baked carrots, peas and potatoes.

 

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Swedish meatloaf doesnt contain ketchup or has a coating of ketchup or  BBQ sauce,  it either bacon or  soy sauce with butter brushed on it.

 

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Cottage pie from my Scottish cookbook, it has lots of   veggies.

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Cheese is you friend, Cheese will take care of you, Cheese will never betray you, But blue mold will kill me.

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Rotus: dont tell any one, it is the same recipe as Swedish meatballs. ;)

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Cheese is you friend, Cheese will take care of you, Cheese will never betray you, But blue mold will kill me.

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Hey guys, been a while. Great looking stuff as always! I'll try not to be a stranger again...

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Sleep, bike, cook, feed, repeat...

Chef Facebook HQ Menlo Park, CA

My eGullet Foodblog

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Blue plate special for my adult son. Mini meatloaf, baked potato, peas.

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  • Like 9

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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PB :

 

I didnt really want to mention it :

 

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are you near Colorado ?

 

Washington St ?

 

you get your jelly there ?

 

looks tasty any way you can get it.

 

just saying

PB Glow.jpg

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Blue plate special for my adult son. Mini meatloaf, baked potato, peas.

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No..RT..this is something I stumbled..across..looking for a mint jelly..now is has a nice sweetness...compliment Ed by the spice and cognac


Its good to have Morels

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Tonight I made beef stock with some beef shank and necks/knuckles I had in the freezer. Bone marrow was cut from the shin and left to soak in salted water and was simmered in some stock just to cook through. In the same stock I reheated the meat (that was my cup to drink). Some kale, broccoli, always present kimchi, some left overs in little bowls. For the kids, Italian version of congee. Beef stock, rice, pressured cooked 6 minutes, crumble shin in the bowl.

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Life has been......full of stress to say the least, lately.  Of course, that affects our food choices.  

 

My WONDERFUL egg suppliers chickens finally decided to begin laying again so we got a dozen eggs.

 

Tonight we needed breakfast for dinner.

 

Boudin, fresh eggs and fried taters

 

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How long does that meat cupcake take to cook? 30 min at 350?

Yup. Took it to 160 Fahrenheit.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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it has been about 3 weeks since I stopped by my fish guy.. I picked up some shrimp. made a garlic sauce.  tomato paste, wine, a half piece of bacon, bay, garlic made into a paste, salt, hot paprika, thyme,black pepper butter and olive oil. 

 

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came out super rich

 

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added this pasta.. it was really good. cooked for three minutes. it was dried and shelf stable but, tasted very similar to fresh.  it was a sample but, i think it was like a 5 dollar retail.  

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Added spinach with the par sautéed shrimp, moments before the cooked pasta.  A shot of olive oil and black pepper. it was really nice. 

 

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Edited by BKEats (log)
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Yesterday dinner was braised duck leg braised with pinot noir sauce and green salad with shallot vinaigrette. The duck recipe was from the NY Times, originally adapted from "Bay Wolf Restaurant Cookbook". It is a relatively simple recipe, easy to make and yet super tasty.

 

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Another bowl of phở.  (See here** for the stock & etc)

 

Being assembled.  Raw shaved ribeye, cooked sliced tendon, cooked sliced tripe.

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Assembled bowl.  I added beef balls w/ tendon (commercial) to the reheated stock/broth; and also just barely wilted the Thai basil in the hot broth immediately before transferring to the bowl.  Everything went into the bowl this time except the coriander leaves and the bean sprouts which were added as eating went along.

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** Hmm, I notice now that the previous picture had a strong yellow cast.  My regrets.

 

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Prawncrackers please stop! There are now tongue tracks on my iPad. Can you tell us more about the pork and the taro dish and particularly what makes it Hakka.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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It's a classic Hakka dish "Woo Tau Kau Yuk" or taro with pork. Basically the pork belly is poached then fried then steamed to ensure perfect soft mouthfeel. The taro is also fried first before steaming with the pork. The flavouring is predominately red-fermented beancurd and Chinese miso (and other secret ingredients). It's a true soul food dish.

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For one rendition of the preserved mustard greens version of the pork belly and taro dish see here (梅菜扣肉).  Linda Lau Anusasananan also has two detailed step-by-step renditions of the mustard greens version in her book given in the pale-orange pages (i.e. the "classic" dishes).


Edited by huiray (log)

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Thank you Prawncrackers and huiray.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Can you tell us more about the pork and the taro dish and particularly what makes it Hakka.

 

Although it originated among the Hakka people, it is also popular here among the Zhuang people. Known as 扣肉 (kòu ròu) which literally means "bowl meat", it is served at pretty much every family festive meal. I'll be eatin git every day through the upcoming Spring Festival. The taro version is the preference here. 

 

It gets the name as the interlaced pork and taro slices are steamed in a bowl, which is then tipped for serving retaining it's bowl shape. Most people seem to buy them ready prepared. Even the local supermarkets offer it. 

Here is one I bought and ate recently:

 

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Having a surfeit of ciabatta I cut half a loaf in half lengthwise and mounded it with provolone and salami, pouring on olive oil and balsamic vinegar.

 

Accompanied by a recipe of grilled radicchio from Bitter.

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