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Naftal

Winter Teas: What do you drink when it's cold?

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Well, the polar vortex has returned and I am drinking teas that go well with cold weather :  strong black tea and powdered green tea with butter ("Tibetan"-style). And, I was wondering: What do you drink-  tea-wise-  when cold weather hits? 

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"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)

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One tea bag "Chai extra" (cinnamon bark, star anise, orange peel, black tea), steeped for 10 min in hot red wine. Repeat until comfortably warm ....

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Yup....gotta have chai this time of year!!!!!!  :smile:

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~Martin :)

"Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!"

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

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One tea bag "Chai extra" (cinnamon bark, star anise, orange peel, black tea), steeped for 10 min in hot red wine. Repeat until comfortably warm ....

Duvel- I really need try this!!! Stash Tea Company makes a tea similar to the one you described.

One tea bag "Chai extra" (cinnamon bark, star anise, orange peel, black tea), steeped for 10 min in hot red wine. Repeat until comfortably warm ....


"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)

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Where doth one acquire said teabag?

I usually make them myself (it's basically a reduced mix for loo shui - Chinese master sauce), but there are commercial options as well ...

image.jpg

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Organic Black Ceylon.. with lemon and honey 


Edited by Ashen (log)

"Why is the rum always gone?"

Captain Jack Sparrow

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One tea bag "Chai extra" (cinnamon bark, star anise, orange peel, black tea), steeped for 10 min in hot red wine. Repeat until comfortably warm ....

 

Hi Duvel. This may be a stupid question, but how hot should the wine be? I have never had hot red wine in a beverage before!

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Hi Duvel. This may be a stupid question, but how hot should the wine be? I have never had hot red wine in a beverage before!

For steeping close to boiling point, for drinking as hot as you can tolerate (should be around boiling point minus outside temperature)

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Yet again I would like to recommend Republic of Tea's  Cardamon Cinnamon Herb Tea  (Details here)  the "Full-Leaf"  loose  - which I buy in the "bulk"  One pound bag and store in an airtight container.

 

This when added to ANY tea, black, red, oolong or green, produces a spicy WARMING cup which one can "adjust" to their own taste.

 

I have been buying this since it first appeared in a local health food store in late 1992 and they were serving samples of the teas from this new company.

 

I have tried numerous chai blends and while some are excellent, I keep returning to this nicely balanced blend of spices that allows ME to get the exact flavor I prefer. 

 

It is also handy for additions to marinades and finely ground is a nice combination of spices for quick breads and also makes a fantastic syrup for dressing fruit salads, hot fruit compotes, etc. 

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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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Watching Dr. Oz recently, he recommended 'white tea' to help one from overeating during the holidays.

My stores in my smallish city don't sell white tea.  Is it worth searching for?  I know nothing about it.

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I have been drinking ridiculous amounts of genmaicha lately, just reinfusing all day.

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Watching Dr. Oz recently, he recommended 'white tea' to help one from overeating during the holidays.

My stores in my smallish city don't sell white tea.  Is it worth searching for?  I know nothing about it.

 

White tea is good, it's a Chinese thing, and it's just regular camellia sinensis prepared differently than green, black, etc. I would not trust a damn thing Dr Oz says about anything without several pages of citations backing him up, however.

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in addition to the usual year-round stuff, masala chai and lapsang feature in my winter drinking

Hassouni- You are a spirits expert, what do you think of lapsang and whiskey as a winter drink? Personally, I think this is a natural pairing which I would drink. But, do you think it is worth serving others?


"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)

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One tea bag "Chai extra" (cinnamon bark, star anise, orange peel, black tea), steeped for 10 min in hot red wine. Repeat until comfortably warm ....

 

I bought a box of Stash Chai teabags yesterday, just to do this!  I usually do a whole bottle with whole spices, but this would be when I want it instant gratification.

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Hassouni- You are a spirits expert, what do you think of lapsang and whiskey as a winter drink? Personally, I think this is a natural pairing which I would drink. But, do you think it is worth serving others?

 

I'm actually in the process of experimenting with just that. I think it's a great idea, if people like smoky whisky, then smoky tea is a natural partner.

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I have been drinking ridiculous amounts of genmaicha lately, just reinfusing all day.

slkinsey- Have you ever combined genmaicha with matcha? My favorite local tea house serves it this way.


"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)

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The newest issue of the monthly catalog from Republic of Tea arrived in today's mail - this month's free sample is Peppermint Bark  and the "cover special" is a free tin of British Breakfast Tea with all orders over $30.00 until 12/1.

 

If you subscribe and also sub to the emails, you will get special notices of  free shipping and other goodies.  I pay attention and have scored some real bargains.


"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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slkinsey- Have you ever combined genmaicha with matcha? My favorite local tea house serves it this way.

 

I've had it that way & it can be very good.  Lately I've been drinking this gemnaicha from In Pursuit of Tea.  It's made with sencha rather than bancha, and I steep at a typical green tea temperature to balance the infusion in favor of the tea  (it's plenty toasty already).  With a product of this quality, the addition of a small amount of matcha is really not needed.


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In warm weather I drink mostly black tea, iced. In winter I drink a lot of green tea--jasmine pearl and my new favorite, emerald oolong. Tastes like buttah.

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In warm weather I drink mostly black tea, iced. In winter I drink a lot of green tea--jasmine pearl and my new favorite, emerald oolong. Tastes like buttah.

Katie Meadow- Is Emerald Oolong similar to Milk Oolong? Milk Oolong has a very pronounced dairy flavor.


"As life's pleasures go, food is second only to sex.Except for salami and eggs...Now that's better than sex, but only if the salami is thickly sliced"--Alan King (1927-2004)

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