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Bowl to Let Bread Dough Rise In


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I'm confused.  I assumed the bowl was for the first rise.  In the good old days, the second rise would have been in a baking pan, no?  Conversely, I've never heard of using proofing baskets for the first rise.

I don't think it's you that's confused. The bowl would certainly be used for the first rise (bulk fermentation) and the bannetons for the final proofing. I guess I was just trying to stress that logic did not play into the equation and obviously lost my sense of logic!

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

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When I see one in a high-end kitchenware store priced at $75 I'm inclined to hope so. But I doubt there is any practical value to using this over any other bowl that is adequately sized for the dough. These bowls may have made sense back in the days when kitchens were often cold and drafty. I suspect they would have maintained temperature better than glass or steel. No science involved in my assumption. They interest me in for nostalgic reasons.

Edited to make sense.

Edited by Anna N (log)

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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I don't think it's you that's confused. The bowl would certainly be used for the first rise (bulk fermentation) and the bannetons for the final proofing. I guess I was just trying to stress that logic did not play into the equation and obviously lost my sense of logic!

 

True! While I'm a pretty advanced home cook, I'm a novice baker so I'm not familiar with the equipment/techniques/processes involved in proofing and baking bread. My question was about bannetons betrayed my ignorance, as I really wasn't sure why one would use a bowl over a proofing basket. Thanks for clearing things up!

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  • 3 weeks later...

I have all kinds of bowls but I usually use a Cambro container with a lid.  I prefer to have a container that is MUCH LARGER than 8 cup because I have often had bread doughs rise much more than expected - some can triple in volume and go exploring outside the container if the space is not adequate.

 

Some doughs that are heavier are more predictable but some, such as sourdoughs are not. 

Like this?

 

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002PMV77G/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o07_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

 

I've started doing the "Artisan Bread in 5 Minutes..." and they recommended.  I even mixed the dough with my KA stand mixer using this.  A little awkward but it worked fine.

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  • 4 weeks later...

I don't know. I grew up in the UK and my grandmother and all of my aunts had a bowl very similar to this that was dedicated to bread. They were all decorated on the outside with wheat sheaves.

 

Probably Mason Cash. It's kind of THE British bowl brand all British grandmothers would have. See hither: https://www.google.com.au/search?q=mason+cash&espv=2&biw=2144&bih=1072&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=ZvykVKPFNYi2mwXs94HwCQ&ved=0CAcQ_AUoAg

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bread11.jpg

 

I have a few of these metal bowls, this the small one, I have a larger on too and that is what I use, they are sturdy, easy to clean and I have never had a problem with the bread rising

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Cheese is you friend, Cheese will take care of you, Cheese will never betray you, But blue mold will kill me.

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Probably Mason Cash. It's kind of THE British bowl brand all British grandmothers would have. See hither: https://www.google.com.au/search?q=mason+cash&espv=2&biw=2144&bih=1072&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ei=ZvykVKPFNYi2mwXs94HwCQ&ved=0CAcQ_AUoAg

You may well be right although I am not seeing any wheat sheaves.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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