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JoNorvelleWalker

Methode Rotuts

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5 hours ago, MetsFan5 said:

 

 

  Ok so what exactly is the point here? To make crappy wine somehow drinkable? And to get the drinker drunk? I know carbonation enhances people's reaction to alcohol. Why not just buy a good, drinkable wine? Isn't this on par with adding bubbles to coffee to get the caffeine high faster? Crappy wine is crappy wine. Is this a budget issue? 

 

Partly it might be a budget issue. But I like the idea to carbonate wines that usually would not be developed into sparkling wine. Finding a good sparkling Riesling is a pain, finding a good Riesling and carbonating it rather easy.

 

Damn. I just put one kitchen tool more on my next home leave shopping list. Thanks Rotuts ...

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"   crappy wine somehow drinkable  ""   is always going to be crappy.

 

as menitoned , its to make decent table wine a bit fizzy.   its the same thing bulk wine makes do to make ' champagne '

 

of note :   the 750 cc version

 

Mastrad A01900 Purefizz Soda Maker

 

https://www.target.com/p/mastrad-purefizz-soda-maker/-/A-15645358

 

no longer seems available

 

there is this :

 

SodaPlus SP76327 Soda Carbonating Starter Kit

 

I got one of these for a ' spare '

 

its not as nice as the 750 cc model as there is more dead space involved therefore you need more cartridges / trial

 

Im mongering if there was a liability issue.   you do have to carefully rfelease the pressure before you open the carafe

 

and the top etc on the larger one is exactly the same as the one on the smaller one

 

money-mouth.gif.87ea440b14466a18c5d48419867e03cd.gif

 


Edited by Smithy Adjusted links to be Amazon-friendly (log)
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21 minutes ago, rotuts said:

and one last thing :

 

its fun !

And surely fun is what it is all about!   Life is much too short to think otherwise. 

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7 hours ago, Duvel said:

Partly it might be a budget issue. But I like the idea to carbonate wines that usually would not be developed into sparkling wine. Finding a good sparkling Riesling is a pain, finding a good Riesling and carbonating it rather easy.

 

Damn. I just put one kitchen tool more on my next home leave shopping list. Thanks Rotuts ...

 

Riesling now on shopping list.

 

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6 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

Riesling now on shopping list.

 

Riesling is always on my shopping list, I prefer the dry variety.  Trader Joe is currently selling Emma Reichart Dry Riesling for 4.99 and I like it.  Will probably like it carbonated much better...

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""  Emma Reichart Dry Riesling for 4.99 ""

 

thanks   Ill look for it.  I too like dry Reisling

 

and TJ's price is right in the ball-park for a Fizz.

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On 10/23/2017 at 11:17 PM, MetsFan5 said:

 

 

  Ok so what exactly is the point here? To make crappy wine somehow drinkable? And to get the drinker drunk? I know carbonation enhances people's reaction to alcohol. Why not just buy a good, drinkable wine? Isn't this on par with adding bubbles to coffee to get the caffeine high faster? Crappy wine is crappy wine. Is this a budget issue? 

 

 

I wasn't aware that carbonation enhanced absorption of whatever is in your stomach, although, without further research, I'm not willing to dispute it. The link sure seems inconclusive.

 

For me, if I had one of these carbonation devices, I'd use it mostly for tap water to make my own seltzer without having to carry it on a four mile round trip on foot. I would sometimes mix that with vodka, I admit. There is a lot appeal to fizzy drinks that don't contain alcohol or caffeine. Just ask the mega rich Coca Cola Corp. or their investors.

 

And yeah, a lot of the eG community is retired and some of us are more flush than others, but I don't know anyone in their right mind who wants to spend more than necessary to have a good end result.

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19 hours ago, Thanks for the Crepes said:

 

I wasn't aware that carbonation enhanced absorption of whatever is in your stomach, although, without further research, I'm not willing to dispute it. The link sure seems inconclusive.

 

For me, if I had one of these carbonation devices, I'd use it mostly for tap water to make my own seltzer without having to carry it on a four mile round trip on foot. I would sometimes mix that with vodka, I admit. There is a lot appeal to fizzy drinks that don't contain alcohol or caffeine. Just ask the mega rich Coca Cola Corp. or their investors.

 

And yeah, a lot of the eG community is retired and some of us are more flush than others, but I don't know anyone in their right mind who wants to spend more than necessary to have a good end result.

 

 

  I've considered Soda Streams and similar items because I do love soda water but because it's almost the only carbonated beverage I like, I can't validate the cost. 

 

But if if it makes things fun for you guys then cheers! 

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On ‎10‎/‎25‎/‎2017 at 11:13 PM, MetsFan5 said:

 

 

  I've considered Soda Streams and similar items because I do love soda water but because it's almost the only carbonated beverage I like, I can't validate the cost. 

 

But if if it makes things fun for you guys then cheers! 

 

Quite seriously consider a multifunction vessel like the iSi.  Works for pancakes, methode rotuts, whipped cream, Hollandaise*, pressure extractions, soda...or as at the moment a zinfandel carafe.  In a pinch I have used one as a vase.

 

 

*not that I employ mine for Hollandaise.

 


Edited by JoNorvelleWalker contemptible autocorrect (log)
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I have a new MR glass :

 

5a1070dbef10d_MRGl.thumb.jpg.083e7065bd07d7f6cb52e8c8ef66658b.jpg

 

sorry you can't see the bubbles.

 

I was In the Hunt for a new pan,  ended up w a Demeyere saucier    on sale 

 

http://www.zwillingonline.com

 

and then 

 

http://www.zwillingonline.com/zwilling-sorrento-double-wall-glassware.html

 

they had a sale on all these vacuum glasses.  there are many sizes.  this is 10 oz

 

about the right size for an initial MR.

 

it a fine glass and does not need a coaster or the rubber-band cloth system Id been useing

 

it large at the hand hold level , so might not work for a smaller hand

 

very light  and when soapy  very slippery  .

 

keeps the MR at just the right temp until the next refill.

 

 


Edited by rotuts (log)
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2 minutes ago, rotuts said:

a fine glass and does not need a coaster or the rubber-band cloth system Id been useing

 

Nice glass!  Things are getting quite classy chez @rotuts - moving away from the "rubber-band cloth system" sounds very upscale indeed xD!

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the older system did have a certain Panache .

 

you will have to scroll way back to see my Methode.

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just to save you some time :

 

Old Methode :

 

5a1075516fb1a_RotaryChamp.thumb.jpg.5ad8d1bed2017e22a07c42d429da67ce.jpg

 

that's a Baccarat Rotary G&T glass   I stumbled on Baccarat while in FR in the mid ' 80;s

 

everything was very inexpensive  @ 11 FF / USD

 

they no longer make Rotary  and I can no longer afford it but Im well stocked.

 

that glass on ebay might be 300 - 400 USD    if you have the box

 

maybe most of the panache comes from the glass ?  but Ive certainly moved it into its own

 

Dimension.   I only have 3    used to have 4.

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