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JoNorvelleWalker

Methode Rotuts

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N2O makes for a wicked MR, particularly when it is unexpected.

I thought you were meant to drink it, not sniff the bubbles.

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Tonight, just for fun, I went with one silver cylinder and one gold, as encouraged by Dave Arnold.  Not bad (and I didn't spill it) but I sort of think I prefer either all silver or all gold.

 

The night before I had liberal Soave but uncarbonated.  It sort of depends upon the food.

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A possibly interesting anecdote:  last night I was enjoying my MR with a baguette, apple (granny smith), and cheese.  At one point I mistakenly grabbed a pressure vessel that had not yet been carbonated (or whatever your vapors of choice).  Horrible flat stuff, it was all I could do to choke it down.

 

The glass, that is.  The rest of the vessel soon enough became MR.

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"someone I know"  who might live "nearby"  MR's some dryish white from a box  [ed.:  :blink: ]

 

it was ice cold on a warm day, they said 

 

and the fizz took over and was OK

 

that's the story Im sticking to

 

TJ's 3 L   $$  11  in MA

 

probably cheaper near you.

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This perhaps could go almost without saying, but MR is not nearly as efficacious when prepared with previously used cylinders, no matter your vapor of preference.  Ask me how I know this.

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i make it a point to remove used cylinders immediately from the M.R. prep. area.

 

I have yet to be disappointed by this plan.

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Now that I have a PureFizz, I’m ready to join the MR fan club. 

 

I’ve now tried it once with Monsieur Rotuts’ preferred TJ cuvée with okay but underwhelming results.  I saw lots of little bubbles but somehow they didn’t register on the palate, if that makes sense.  A bit of a sour flavor.  Luckily Santa also gave me a few boxes of the CO2 cylinders so I’m ready to try again.

 

My PureFizz came with minimal directions on the packaging and a few tips in the enclosed “recipe” book.  I learned more from reading here and in MC but still have a few questions.

 

According to the PureFizz info, the bubbles get smaller the more you shake the bottle. Has anyone worked out the optimal number of shakes?  I got very small bubbles but no bubble sensation in the drinking, so perhaps I was over-enthusiastic.

 

PureFizz also says that the more you let the bottle sit, the fizzier it gets.  How long do others let it rest after adding the CO2?  MC recommends an hour, but from what I’ve read here, no one waits that long for MR.

 

Also wondering if the “sour flavor” is a matter of finding the right still wine for my palate, or is it something in my technique?

 

I do not own a Baccarat flute. Perhaps that is the problem.

 

 


Edited by LindaK correct formatting (log)

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10 minutes ago, LindaK said:

I do not own a Baccarat flute. Perhaps that is the problem

:D:D:D

 

Did you taste the wine pre-Fizz?  I would recommend using a wine that you know you enjoy.  I usually go with a dry rosé because the pink bubbles look especially festive.  I haven't done carefully controlled studies but when I've stored the Fizzed product in the fridge for a couple of hours, I thought the bubbles were finer.  But as you have noted, do we really have that sort of time on our hands?????  Of course, I defer to M. Rotuts on all of the above.

 

A side note.  Over the summer, I was thinking it would be nice to have a spare PureFizz bottle and looked into buying a second unit as a spare.  My, but they were hard to come by and pricy, too!  Just the other day, I broke down and ordered one of these SodaPlus units.  I bought an Amazon Warehouse deal (slightly damaged packaging) for ~ $50, including a box of 10 chargers.   It arrived yesterday and except for the 1.2L container, everything is identical to the PureFizz, down to the wording of the manual.   Haven't used it yet.

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Blue, I don;t know where Santa found the PureFizz. Good to know about SodaPlus if I decide that I need a cold canister available at all times!

 

I thought the wine was fine pre-fizz, but the flavor had changed with addition of CO2.  I'm going to try getting it colder too, maybe the hour in the fridge wasn't enough.


Edited by LindaK correct formatting, remove admin comment (log)

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this is what I have :

 

http://www.amazon.com/Mastrad-A01900-Purefizz-Soda-Maker/dp/B00FKVRY1M/ref=pd_sxp_redirect

 

he SodaPluss looks very similar, and might be made by the same company.  It also larger.  my PZ holds 750 cc

 

same a my TJ's

 

indeed try a white you would like to drink flat.

 

keep the wine and container very cold.  I add very cold wine to the bottle and that's been in the freezer.

 

I sometimes them lay the full PF on its side after I charge it up.

 

I think it can handle two CO2 charges.

 

and yes, not just MR, but Life tastes better w Baccarat

 

Ive given up on my B's flute collection for MR

 

I use the Gin and T 'Rotary' 'bar' glass.  less trips to the PF

 

enjoy !

 

P.S.:  just remember that M.R. is not just a Personal Beverage, Its a P.B.++

 

568566912841d_surprised.gif.8bc59ad754c5

 

so make it your Own !

 

I might be having some MR soon, myself !

 

xD


Edited by rotuts (log)
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4 hours ago, LindaK said:

Now that I have a PureFizz, I’m ready to join the MR fan club. 

 

I’ve now tried it once with Monsieur Rotuts’ preferred TJ cuvée with okay but underwhelming results.  I saw lots of little bubbles but somehow they didn’t register on the palate, if that makes sense.  A bit of a sour flavor.  Luckily Santa also gave me a few boxes of the CO2 cylinders so I’m ready to try again.

 

My PureFizz came with minimal directions on the packaging and a few tips in the enclosed “recipe” book.  I learned more from reading here and in MC but still have a few questions.

 

According to the PureFizz info, the bubbles get smaller the more you shake the bottle. Has anyone worked out the optimal number of shakes?  I got very small bubbles but no bubble sensation in the drinking, so perhaps I was over-enthusiastic.

 

PureFizz also says that the more you let the bottle sit, the fizzier it gets.  How long do others let it rest after adding the CO2?  MC recommends an hour, but from what I’ve read here, no one waits that long for MR.

 

Also wondering if the “sour flavor” is a matter of finding the right still wine for my palate, or is it something in my technique?

 

I do not own a Baccarat flute. Perhaps that is the problem.

 

 

 

 

Welcome to the group!  Uncorked by Gerard Liger-Belair Princeton University Press, 2013 is a fine treatise on the science of bubbles, and a good place to start.  And a nice place to end up.  Recommended by Dave Arnold and by me.  Gerard Liger-Belair does not use a flute!  But rather a goblet.  I would add, a large goblet.  Mine are of course Baccarat.

 

Bubbles increase in size the further they travel towards the surface.  If you desire larger bubbles maximize this distance.  But possibly you're just not getting enough carbonation.  I chill my wine in the freezer.  Though sometimes it gets too cold and starts to turn to slush.  I don't use a PureFizz, so cannot offer specific recommendations.

 

By the way, cylinders are cheaper by the case.  This is what I buy (and I can recommend the company):

http://www.creamright.com/product/SODA-360-KAY.html

 

Just for fun I might use a flute tonight.

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As an experiment tonight I made a one CO2 cylinder MR.  Not to save expense, mind you, as of course you know I purchase cylinders by the hundreds.  Even though I am not always as profligate as to make the full Modernist Cuisine three cylinder recipe.

 

I guess one might call this MR cremant.

 

Obviously one can make MR to taste, depending on one's vapors of choice and how happy one wants to be.  As I recall Dave Arnold favors a ratio of something like 3:2.

 

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ive settled on one cylinder / 750 cc of substrate.   I tried 2 but it was too fizzy for me.

 

they only key Ive seen is that everything should be very cold.

 

PS   I wonder what's going on with the pure fizz :

 

http://www.ebay.com/itm/like/111552425969?lpid=82&chn=ps&ul_noapp=true

 

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B00FKVRY1M/?tag=soda-maker-20

 

this looks to me to be the same thing more or less :

 

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00CEAPDME/ref=pd_lpo_sbs_dp_ss_2?pf_rd_p=1944687582&pf_rd_s=lpo-top-stripe-1&pf_rd_t=201&pf_rd_i=B00FKVRY1M&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_r=0PCEPDY5GWJKW4K3TP01

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Be interesting to get a nitrous oxide cylinder for the MR.

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what would you be looking for, i.e. in a fizzy drink   vs  whipping cream ?

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Fizzy drink with a bit of polypharmacy

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Ah  Yes.  PolyPharmacy.

 

well    your not going to get anything out of the N2O with the fizz.

 

not from personal experience    

 

but some time ago I was familiar with Uptake and Distribution.

 

not going to happen here re N2O

 

but Id try it to see if the Fizz has other interesting properties if I had a cartridge or two of Cream-Whip

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This time I intended to make a 1:1 batch of MR.  I looked and looked but could not find my nitrous oxide.  I know I have several boxes somewhere.  I hate when I misplace essential kitchen staples.  So, sadly, tonight's MR ended up all carbon dioxide.

 

Life could be far worse.

 

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Now studying wine formally, I have come across MR as it is referred to in the wine world: Pompe Bicyclette.


Edited by nickrey (log)

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On 4/20/2016 at 1:06 PM, rotuts said:

Ah  Yes.  PolyPharmacy.

 

well    your not going to get anything out of the N2O with the fizz.

 

not from personal experience    

 

but some time ago I was familiar with Uptake and Distribution.

 

not going to happen here re N2O

 

but Id try it to see if the Fizz has other interesting properties if I had a cartridge or two of Cream-Whip

 

Not so sure you won't get a little buzz from inhaling the headspace prior to a sip.

 

I like to think that one would.

 

But you do have a point about U and D.

 

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On 6/14/2015 at 11:12 PM, JoNorvelleWalker said:

A possibly interesting anecdote:  last night I was enjoying my MR with a baguette, apple (granny smith), and cheese.  At one point I mistakenly grabbed a pressure vessel that had not yet been carbonated (or whatever your vapors of choice).  Horrible flat stuff, it was all I could do to choke it down.

 

The glass, that is.  The rest of the vessel soon enough became MR.

 

 

  Ok so what exactly is the point here? To make crappy wine somehow drinkable? And to get the drinker drunk? I know carbonation enhances people's reaction to alcohol. Why not just buy a good, drinkable wine? Isn't this on par with adding bubbles to coffee to get the caffeine high faster? Crappy wine is crappy wine. Is this a budget issue? 


Edited by MetsFan5 (log)

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1 hour ago, MetsFan5 said:

 

 

  Ok so what exactly is the point here? To make crappy wine somehow drinkable? And to get the drinker drunk? I know carbonation enhances people's reaction to alcohol. Why not just buy a good, drinkable wine? Isn't this on par with adding bubbles to coffee to get the caffeine high faster? Crappy wine is crappy wine. Is this a budget issue? 

 

 

That's more than two years ago and I don't remember what the wine in question was.  But it wasn't good.  Particularly when I was expecting it to be carbonated.  Ever been served a flat coke?  I was trying several different vintages to see which carbonated best.

 

My go to white wine is Folonari Soave -- wonderful wine -- carbonated or not.  It is a great budget wine.  Eternal thanks to Eric Asimov.  I do not carbonate my wines to get drunk.  Getting drunk has never been a challenge.  Upperclassmates charged only a modest markup.*  Funny I was just having this conversation with a visiting collage friend over dinner this evening.

 

But yes, I confess this is a budgetary issue.  In my pensionary years I cannot afford vintage Grand cru at every meal.

 

 

*Technically speaking they charged only Pennsylvania State Store prices but they purchased in volume out of state.  Let's hear it for free enterprise.  I trust the statute of limitations has run out.

 

 

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