Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Gathering Dust in my Storecupboard


KaryLou
 Share

Recommended Posts

I have to stop buying foodstuffs which look gorgeous, but for which I have no use whatsoever. The following items have been gathering dust in my cupboard for some time now - could anybody help me out with culinary possibilities?

1. Raspberry Balsamic Vinegar. I tasted some in the shop. It was delicious. So I bought a bottle of the stuff. It remains sealed. What was I thinking?

2. Pomegranate molasses.

3. Camargue salt. Ok, I admit it: despite never having come across this before and despite a hefty price tag, I just couldn't resist the pretty packaging.

:wacko:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Karylou, give 'em as gifts to rubes who'll be impressed. :wink:

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have to stop buying foodstuffs which look gorgeous, but for which I have no use whatsoever.  The following items have been gathering dust in my cupboard for some time now - could anybody help me out with culinary possibilities?

2.  Pomegranate molasses.

http://www.foodtv.ca/recipes/recipedetails...recipe_3080.asp

This is Christine Cushing's ingredient of the minute according to her TV show!

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Christine Cushing. :laugh:

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

Link to comment
Share on other sites

KaryLou--use the Camargue as you would any sea salt--where you want to taste and feel the crunch of the salt crystal. (It's a waste to dissolve it. Use regular salt for that.) Sprinkle it on some foie gras just before serving (if you are so lucky) or toast up some brioche, drizzle the toast with melted extra bittersweet chocolate and sprinkle with a few grains. It can go well with many caramel or chocolate desserts.

Drizzle some of the pomegranate molasses on a plate--pour a layer of olive oil over it--and then dip good crusty bread into it.

I can't speak about Ms. Cushing, Jin, seeing as I'm south of the border, but that pomegranate glazed pork tenderloin does sound good. And that site sure looks pretty.

Steve Klc

Pastry chef-Restaurant Consultant

Oyamel : Zaytinya : Cafe Atlantico : Jaleo

chef@pastryarts.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've had venison with chocolate and raspberry sauce before which is quite lovely and you could maybe use the vinegar in such a sauce. Raspberry vinegars were big around the late 80's and the Nouvelle Cuisine fad and then became about as cool as kiwi fruit served with fish.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Steve, Cushing told people doing a call-in that mirin (sweet cooking wine) is rice vinegar (su).

Yes, the FN Canada site is quite well done. There are some interviews with St. Mario and Vic Chanko (A Bourdain) that I've posted about before.

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There's clearly no excuse for raspberry balsamic, but pomegranate molasses is a perfectly respectable ingredient used in much middle-Eastern cooking. The Moro cookbook (which generally rocks) has this to say:

Pomegranate molasses ('dibs rumman' in Arabic) is a syrup made by boiling down the juice of sour Iranian pomegranates until it thickens and changes in colour from red to rich auburn brown. It has a colour and consistency similar to black treacle and is sweet-sour in flavour. Common in Syria and Lebanon, it is used for flavouring soups and stews, sauces, meat and fish, as well as for dressing salads or vegetables, or diluted as a drink.

The book's own uses include a marinade for grilled quails. One day I will invent a stunning cocktail that features the stuff :smile:

Edit: oh yeah, I should finish that link.

Edited by Kikujiro (log)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've used pomegranite molasses. But not for about two years. I'll have to check and see if it's still lurking somewhere and chuck it.

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Steve, Cushing told people doing a call-in that mirin (sweet cooking wine) is rice vinegar (su).

Christine does make a fair number of such boo-boos but she's live and trying to cook and answer questions simultaneously while listening to her floor manager counting down the seconds to an ad break - I just admire anyone who can multitask in front of a live audience like that.

She certainly attracts some interesting guest chefs, including, I believe, Eric Ripert.

She's also a linguist turned chef - interesting career development!

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Anna, her current call-in live program is certainly an improvement over her previous series.

"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Try this excellent recipe for muhammara (hot & sweet red pepper dip with walnuts and pomegranates), from Paula Wolfert's Cooking of the Eastern Mediterranean :

http://www.paula-wolfert.com/recipes/mouhamara.html

(It's spelled muhammara in the book, but mouhamara on Wolfert's website...)

Wolfert recommends serving this dish with meat or fish kebobs, crisp pita triangles, or lavash.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...