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FrogPrincesse

"Death & Co: Modern Classic Cocktails"

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For the record, I like the Naked and Famous a lot, even though I tend to dislike Aperol in most applications because it's not bitter enough.

 

(from the Mezcal thread).

 

I like the original D&C recipe well enough -- though to my taste I find the following much improved:

 

1 oz Del Maguey (tonight I chose Vida)

3/4 oz yellow V.E.P.

3/4 oz Aperol

1 oz lime juice

1 dash Angostura orange

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It looks like I've neglected this thread, although I've made plenty of cocktails from the book since I last posted.

 

Here is the Widow's Laurel (Joaquín Simó) with Busnel VSOP calvados (Daron XO calvados), Drambuie, Carpano Antica Formula vermouth (Punt e Mes & Dolin sweet vermouth), St Elizabeth allspice dram, Angostura bitters.

 

I really like the little kick of spice at the end from the allspice dram, and any occasion to mix with calvados and fine by me.

 

15707690928_655e1fccec_z.jpg

 

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Red Ant (Thomas Waugh) with Rittenhouse rye, Del Maguey Chichicapa mezcal (Vida mezcal), Massenez kirsch (Etter 1998 kirsch), cherry heering (Luxardo cherry liqueur), homemade cinnamon bark syrup, Bittermens xocolatl mole bitters.

 

This one tasted awfully tannic to me, but the person who ended up finishing it thought it was perfectly fine. Strong cherry notes from the cherry liqueur and the kirsch, smoke from the mezcal (hence the name?).

 

16468264422_9a54e11726_z.jpg


Edited by FrogPrincesse (log)

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Sforzando (Eryn Reece), a smoky and spicy Manhattan variation with Rittenhouse rye, Del Maguey Chichicapa mezcal (Vida mezcal), Benedictine, Dolin dry vermouth, Bittermens xocolatl mole bitters (The Bitter Truth for Bittermens).

 

15106162649_9cee927991_z.jpg\

 

It's the dry version of Stephen Cole's Racketeer (although that one guilds the lily by adding a touch of yellow Chartreuse, a spray of Laphroaig, and Peychaud's bitters).


Edited by FrogPrincesse (log)

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The Coralillo (Thomas Waugh) which is the Mexican name for the coral snake. El Tesoro añejo tequila (7 Leguas añejo), yellow Chartreuse, Busnel VSOP calvados (Daron XO), Clear Creek pear brandy (Morand pear eau-de-vie), apple slice garnish. Potent and aromatic. The use of eau-de-vie in small touches is clever and inspiring (also seen in the Hallyday and the Red Ant).

 

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Jovencourt Daiquiri (Phil Ward), a Daiquiri variation with Barbancourt white rum (Plantation 3 Stars white rum), Del Maguey Vida mezcal, lime juice, simple syrup.

 

Very nice little hint of smoke and agave from the mezcal. It reminds me of Phil Ward's FWB (same idea, with batavia arrack).

 

16087916114_8ac1aec639_z.jpg

 

 

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Rhum agricole with absinthe, green Chartreuse and fresh basil. Based on the Daisy de Santiago (Daiquiri with Chartreuse). It sounds overly busy, but it's actually sublime...

 

The Green Mile (Phil Ward) with Barbancourt white rum (La Mauny white rhum agricole), lime juice, green Chartreuse, simple syrup, Vieux Pontarlier absinthe (St. George absinthe), Thai basil (Italian basil).

 

16142445312_65a28d5018_z.jpg

 

 

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Another one in the same vein (rhum agricole + absinthe), Brian Miller's Green Flash.

JM white rhum agricole 100 proof (La Mauny, which is only 40% abv), lemon juice, acacia honey syrup (eucalyptus honey syrup), Vieux Pontarlier absinthe (St. George absinthe), dry Champagne (Kirkland brut rosé).

Really fabulous too, light and extremely flavorful. Fun and unexpected.

 

16114028811_96cf318d8f_z.jpg

 

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Grand Street (Alex Day) with Beefeater gin, Punt e Mes, Cynar, Maraschino liqueur, muddled grapefruit twist. I had made this cocktail before the book was published with ratios that were a bit different and without the muddled grapefruit skin. The version from the book is superior; there is something really pleasant about the grapefruit oil and the bitter caramel notes of the Cynar. A great bitter Martinez variation.

 

16524117649_5c1e87cf95_z.jpg

 

 

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Grand Street (Alex Day) with Beefeater gin, Punt e Mes, Cynar, Maraschino liqueur, muddled grapefruit twist. I had made this cocktail before the book was published with ratios that were a bit different and without the muddled grapefruit skin. The version from the book is superior; there is something really pleasant about the grapefruit oil and the bitter caramel notes of the Cynar. A great bitter Martinez variation.

 

I'll have to try that. Already on my to-do list was Rafa's Locandiera, which is a similar idea complicated by some Cherry Heering, hopped grapefruit bitters, and a Campari rinse. Have you tried that one?

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I'll have to try that. Already on my to-do list was Rafa's Locandiera, which is a similar idea complicated by some Cherry Heering, hopped grapefruit bitters, and a Campari rinse. Have you tried that one?

I haven't tried this exact combination, but anything resembling a Martinez is fine by me. Added to the list! (I will have to make do with regular grapefruit bitters though, as I don't have the hopped version.)

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6th Street Swizzle (Phil Ward) with La Favorite white rhum agricole, lime juice, cane sugar syrup, and Angostura bitters.

This is spectacular as expected, but I am a huge La Favorite fan to begin with. Important note: I reduced the amount of sweetener significantly, from 3/4 oz 2:1 syrup to 3/4 oz simple syrup. With the specified amount it would have been too sweet for sure (the drink contains 1 oz of lime juice).

 

The real drama here is that I finished the bottle of Favorite, and that it does not seem currently available in Southern California. :sad:

 

16694103816_c2065717cc_z.jpg


Edited by FrogPrincesse (log)

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DrinkUpNY has it. (So does at least one poster on this forum who's happy to arrange an exchange...)

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DrinkUpNY has it. (So does at least one poster on this forum who's happy to arrange an exchange...)

 

I've seen that, but they no longer offer free shipping to California. I was hoping for something more local.

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Hi-Time has La Favorite in stock, although they explained that it's not reflected online as it is a low stock inventory. I feel much better already. :smile:

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Another swizzle, the Cirque Swizzle from Jessica Gonzalez with Anchor Junipero gin, yellow Chartreuse, crème Yvette (R&W crème de violette), lemon juice, vanilla syrup (short pour), simple syrup (skipped).

 

With the violette, the top of the drink has a slight purple tinge that you can't see on the photo; with crème Yvette it would be bright red if I am not mistaken.

 

Even with no added simple syrup and the reduced vanilla syrup, this was most definitely on the sweet side. The cocktail is interesting, but the balance was a bit off. I wanted to like it but it needs tweaking.

 

16513043927_498420873d_z.jpg

 

 

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202 Steps (Phil Ward) with tangerine, Baker's bourbon (Elijah Craig bourbon), simple syrup, orange bitters. This one is an Old Fashioned variation with fresh citrus. A good concept but it's too sweet with the stated amount of simple syrup (1/2 oz that I reduced to 1/4 oz, which was still too much). Also it did not feel punchy enough. I think my tangerine might have been overly juicy.

 

16048937657_c9540b271d_z.jpg

 

 

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There's a nice section towards the back of the book called Multiple Choice, in which D&C present a number of cocktails with options for the base spirit.  We've been playing for the past three nights with the Coin Toss (base spirit, sweet vermouth, Bénédictine, yellow Chartreuse, Peychaud's).  The first night I used French brandy (nothing special - not Cognac), the second night Buffalo Trace and last night Rittenhouse 100.

 

They've all been excellent, with of course differences in character.  Next on the list is one with rum - it's going to be Appleton 12; I suspect Smith & Cross might be a funk too far.

 

I highly recommend the drink, both because it tastes great (important!) and because it's a good learning experience to see what different bases do to a drink when nothing else changes.

 

I tried the Coin Toss with Rittenhouse rye. Excellent Manhattan variation. It reminds me highly of the Greenpoint, another Manhattan variation with Chartreuse.

 

16065188357_b9d4af9df5_z.jpg

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Glad you enjoyed it.  The Rittenhouse and the brandy variants were, I think, the best.  It's been a little while, but I don't remember the rum one being particularly special.  OK; just not wonderful.

 

And as it happens, we had a Greenpoint last night.  Certainly one of my favourites of the Manhattan variants, although I must put in a strong word for Death & Co's Manhattan Transfer.

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Glad you enjoyed it.  The Rittenhouse and the brandy variants were, I think, the best.  It's been a little while, but I don't remember the rum one being particularly special.  OK; just not wonderful.

 

And as it happens, we had a Greenpoint last night.  Certainly one of my favourites of the Manhattan varaiants, although I must put in a strong word for Death & Co's Manhattan Transfer.

 

I wonder how well a nice solid agave forward reposado tequila might work in the Coin Toss. Might have to give that a try. I think the yellow chartreuse would play well with it. The Kah 110 proof reposado might be just the thing.

 

And I really need to spend some more time with the Death & Co book. Have had it a couple months now but really just kind of picked through it rather than giving it a good read.


Edited by tanstaafl2 (log)
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I wonder how well a nice solid agave forward reposado tequila might work in the Coin Toss. Might have to give that a try. I think the yellow chartreuse would play well with it. The Kah 110 proof reposado might be just the thing.

 

And I really need to spend some more time with the Death & Co book. Have had it a couple months now but really just kind of picked through it rather than giving it a good read.

That sounds like a great idea that I am going to steal.

 

It's a really good cocktail book. PDT was good too, but this one is even better in my opinion. Lots of good information in addition to the cocktails. The general organization of the book makes a lot of sense as well.

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That sounds like a great idea that I am going to steal.

 

It's a really good cocktail book. PDT was good too, but this one is even better in my opinion. Lots of good information in addition to the cocktails. The general organization of the book makes a lot of sense as well.

 

I look forward to your report! I am stuck at a party full of heathen vodka drinkers tonight and unless I bring them with me I won't have the necessary ingredients to whip one up.

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Another one in the same vein (rhum agricole + absinthe), Brian Miller's Green Flash.

JM white rhum agricole 100 proof (La Mauny, which is only 40% abv), lemon juice, acacia honey syrup (eucalyptus honey syrup), Vieux Pontarlier absinthe (St. George absinthe), dry Champagne (Kirkland brut rosé).

Really fabulous too, light and extremely flavorful. Fun and unexpected.

 

16114028811_96cf318d8f_z.jpg

LOVE the glasses!

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Aw thanks. :smile: They are Perrier-Jouët champagne flutes. I had a bunch and broke most of them, but still have these two left. I think they came from a garage sale.

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