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FrogPrincesse

"Death & Co: Modern Classic Cocktails"

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The Conference last night.  A very nice drink, even with various substitutions I was forced to make.

 

Next time I'm at the Hawthorn Lounge I'll get them to make me a real one!

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Oh, nothing too serious. No bourbon so I doubled up the Rittenhouse; the Calvados was some cider a guy at work made and decided he didn't like so he gave it to me to distil; the Cognac was Spanish brandy.

So, just a couple of minor tweaks ...

I have a Joy Division at my elbow as we speak. Rather good, isn't it?

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The Conference last night.  A very nice drink, even with various substitutions I was forced to make.

 

Next time I'm at the Hawthorn Lounge I'll get them to make me a real one!

This was usually Significant Eater's second drink of the night at D&C, when Brian was behind the stick. One of her faves, along with the Final Ward/Last Word.

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The Conference - I had one quite some time ago and thought it was fun, but hadn't felt compelled to make one again (the American Trilogy, on the other hand...).

 

Maybe it's time to revisit. I would upgrade the cognac & calvados selections.

 

6793369991_b5438bc5f3_z.jpg

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Oh, nothing too serious. No bourbon so I doubled up the Rittenhouse; the Calvados was some cider a guy at work made and decided he didn't like so he gave it to me to distil; the Cognac was Spanish brandy.

So, just a couple of minor tweaks ...

I have a Joy Division at my elbow as we speak. Rather good, isn't it?

 

I need me some Calvados/Apple brandy....

 

So, Leslie, when does the eG signature NZ-distilled rum come out?

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Made the Joy Division, used Dolin Blanc though, because that's the one I have open. Still loved it.

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I need me some Calvados/Apple brandy....

 

So, Leslie, when does the eG signature NZ-distilled rum come out?

 

Possibly as early as this weekend.  I did some initial molasses runs a few months ago and the result has been sitting waiting for me to do the spirit run, as it's called.  And I have some new pieces of still that need christening ...

 

If I get anywhere close to W&N I'll be excessively happy!

 

Made the Joy Division, used Dolin Blanc though, because that's the one I have open. Still loved it.

 

I don't think the drink cares.  I used Carpano Bianco.  Lovely.

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Angie's Secret tonight, rum, Becherovka and mole bitters. described as 'christmas cookies in a glass', fairly apt, I really liked it. It wasn't as sweet as cookies in a glass, but nice and spicy.

Bittermans Mole bitters were requested as 2 dashes, how do I measure a dash with a dropper bottle?? I used about 1 cm of dropper's worth.

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Avery Glasser from Bittermens apparently specifies 6 drops as one dash.

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Shruff’s End (Phil Ward) with bonded apple brandy (Daron XO calvados), Laphroaig 10, Benedictine, Peychaud's bitters. Like an apple enjoyed by a campfire. Very nice.  

 

15588983235_e06a3d3391_z.jpg


Edited by FrogPrincesse (log)

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A Cure for Pain tonight - Rittenhouse 100, Buffalo Trace, Carpano (not Antica), port, Campari and creme de cacao.

Odd. It's fine, but with all that in it, I'd expect it to taste like something other than just Rittenhouse.

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I've been doing a major liquor cabinet stockup tied to getting my copy a couple of weeks ago. Why the hell did they not create an app for the book that lets you plug in what you have and have the app identify doable recipes?

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Shruff’s End (Phil Ward) with bonded apple brandy (Daron XO calvados), Laphroaig 10, Benedictine, Peychaud's bitters. Like an apple enjoyed by a campfire. Very nice. 

That description, an apple enjoyed by a campfire, makes this sound really tempting. Unfortunately, I just can't adjust to Islay scotch. Or at least, I can't adjust to Laphroaig which is the only one I've tried. Based on my experience with every drink I've tried using Laphroaig, to me, the drink would probably taste like enjoying an apple in the doctors office while he bandaged me up. I know it's just me, too many people talk about the Islay smoke for it not to be true, but the only smoke I ever get would be what might result from dousing a pile of band-aids in iodine and setting it ablaze. Which makes me sad because the idea of the smoky taste appeals to me.

 

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That description, an apple enjoyed by a campfire, makes this sound really tempting. Unfortunately, I just can't adjust to Islay scotch. Or at least, I can't adjust to Laphroaig which is the only one I've tried. Based on my experience with every drink I've tried using Laphroaig, to me, the drink would probably taste like enjoying an apple in the doctors office while he bandaged me up. I know it's just me, too many people talk about the Islay smoke for it not to be true, but the only smoke I ever get would be what might result from dousing a pile of band-aids in iodine and setting it ablaze. Which makes me sad because the idea of the smoky taste appeals to me.

 

Try with mescal?

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I was going to say mezcal as well. Either that or another Islay scotch that's not as iodine-y.

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That description, an apple enjoyed by a campfire, makes this sound really tempting. Unfortunately, I just can't adjust to Islay scotch. Or at least, I can't adjust to Laphroaig which is the only one I've tried. Based on my experience with every drink I've tried using Laphroaig, to me, the drink would probably taste like enjoying an apple in the doctors office while he bandaged me up. I know it's just me, too many people talk about the Islay smoke for it not to be true, but the only smoke I ever get would be what might result from dousing a pile of band-aids in iodine and setting it ablaze. Which makes me sad because the idea of the smoky taste appeals to me.

 

 

Try Ardbeg or Caol Ila, or indeed Lagavulin. Smoky without the medicinal nature of Laphroaig

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In case anyone was wondering the chamomile-infused Old Overholt from the book is definitely worth making, it brings out a lot of apple notes in the rye. I tried one of Thomas Waugh's drinks using it (name escaping me at the moment) - 2 oz chamomile OO, .75 Campari, .25 St. Germain, stirred, coupe - that was good but I've also been sipping on the stuff straight the past few days. I don't usually buy Overholt as it can get lost in standard rye cocktails, but I'm excited to play with the infused version more.

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The Manhattan Transfer last night - basically, a Manhattan with Ramazzotti.  Really, really good.

 

I'm not sure if I can say that every Manhattan variant is as good as every Negroni variant seems to be, but with this one and a few others I've had there's an argument to be made.

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Try with mescal?

 

 

I was going to say mezcal as well. Either that or another Islay scotch that's not as iodine-y.

The only mezcal available at this end of the province is the Jaral de Berrio... turns out smoke is not one of it's prominent features. After finally managing to get a bottle, I was kinda disappointed to discover that.

 

Try Ardbeg or Caol Ila, or indeed Lagavulin. Smoky without the medicinal nature of Laphroaig

A non/less medicinal Islay may be an option. I'll look into it and decide if I'm brave enough to risk it. :biggrin:

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Ardbeg is one of those 'stills that releases its malts, including many of the special releases, in minis. It's also a large enough player in the market to be stocked at most bars that have a collection that extends beyond Johnnie Walker/Glenfiddich. 

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Tailspin last night from the Classic & Vintage section. I realized while making it that it's a Bijou with a Campari rinse. They make it Chartreuse (and vermouth) heavy with 1.5/1/1 ratios (I am used to 2/1/1, although historically this may be an equal-parts drink). I substituted Dolin sweet vermouth for Carpano Antica.

It's pretty but a little busy.

 

 

15644265341_647f2f00d3_z.jpg
 

 

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Has anybody else noticed that the Zombie recipe was a little odd? It calls for Don's Spices #2, a mix of vanilla syrup and allspice dram (which is an ingredient in the Nui Nui), instead of Don's Mix, the typical grapefruit juice and cinnamon syrup combination.

 

Typo?

 

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