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FrogPrincesse

"Death & Co: Modern Classic Cocktails"

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I'm sitting here with a St Columbus Rill. It's workable. The name, though ... Jimmy McNulty would contend that Bushmill's is Protestant whiskey.

 

 

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I had to try it! 

Twist of the Bijou, an old one that I am fond of, this was definitely not a disappointment, love it! 

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9 hours ago, FrogPrincesse said:

@ChrisTaylorDid you substitute dry vermouth for the blanc on purpose? Curious! :)

 

 

By accident, I guess. But I'd have done it intentionally, too, given the booze you have is always a better option than the booze you don't have.

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Had the Tom Colin's for the first time.  Wonderful even though it is fall.

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23 hours ago, Okanagancook said:

Had the Tom Colin's for the first time.  Wonderful even though it is fall.

 

Under-rated IMO. I should make one

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1 hour ago, haresfur said:

 

Under-rated IMO. I should make one

It just hit the spot on this occasion.  Very refreshing.  Give it another go.  Make a short one.9_9

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3 hours ago, Okanagancook said:

It just hit the spot on this occasion.  Very refreshing.  Give it another go.  Make a short one.9_9

I mean I like them. When I was a pre-teen my parents told me it was a good drink to know for when I found myself in a social situation calling for cocktails. I took more to rum colins though.

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Pink Lady:  1 1/2 ounces plymouth (bombay sapphire), 1/2 oz Laird's Bonded Apple Brandy (Osocalis Apple Brandy, and I don't regret it one bit), 3/4 oz lemon juice, 3/4 oz simple syrup, 1/2 oz housemade grenadine, 1 egg white

 

I agree with Tom Chadwick, "most delicious thing I'd ever tasted". Ok, maybe not "most" but it's up there.

 

Housemade grenadine made all the difference, it is fantastic!

 

 

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