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FrogPrincesse

"Death & Co: Modern Classic Cocktails"

296 posts in this topic

I'm about to make orgeat from the D&Co book, which uses ingredients I haven't seen in other recipes, namely cognac, amaretto, and rose water (but no orange flower water).  I've never made orgeat before, I read the "orgeat" forum on here, yet none mention a recipe with those particular additional ingredients.  Any advice here?  If someone's made it, I'd love to hear comparison stories! 

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Remember the Maine a la Death & Co with Rittenhouse 100 rye, Cocchi vermouth di Torino, Luxardo cherry liqueur (subbed for cherry heering), Etter 1998 kirsch (subbed for Massenez), St. George absinthe (subbed for Vieux Pontarlier).

 

The inclusion of kirsch (which replaces part of the cherry liqueur that you see in most recipes) is interesting. It's a great version of this classic!

 

Remember the Maine a la Death & Co with Rittenhouse 100 rye, Cocchi vermouth di Torino, Luxardo cherry liqueur, Etter 1998 kirsch, St. George absinthe #cocktails #cocktail #craftcocktails #deathandco #whiskey #rye #absinthe #eaudevie #kirsch

 

 

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The Conference (Brian Miller) made with top-notch ingredients is a top-notch cocktail! :) Better than my previous attempt.

 

Here it is with Rittenhouse 100 rye whiskey, High West American Prairie bourbon whiskey (subbed for Buffalo Trace), Daron XO calvados, Pierre Ferrand 1840 cognac (subbed for Hine H), Angostura bitters, xocolatl mole bitters.

 

Conference (Brian Miller) with Rittenhouse 100 rye whiskey, High West American Prairie bourbon whiskey, Daron XO calvados, Pierre Ferrand 1840 cognac, Angostura bitters, xocolatl mole bitters #cocktails #cocktail #craftcocktails #oldfashioned #deathandco

 

 

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North by Northwest (Brian Miller) with Sipsmith London dry gin, lemon juice, simple syrup, St. George absinthe, Crémant de Bourgogne rosé sparkling wine. This is an elevated French 75, the absinthe making all the difference. I had liked it with Old Harbor gin and it's also great with the Sipsmith.

 

North by Northwest (Brian Miller) with Sipsmith London dry gin, lemon juice, simple syrup, St. George absinthe, Crémant de Bourgogne rosé sparkling wine #cocktail #cocktails #craftcocktails #absinthe #gin #deathandco

 

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Yes, the Martica's a good one.  I also like the Chocolate Martica - increase the vermouth to a full ounce (from .75) and sub two dashes of mole bitters for the Angostura.

 

I also went D&C for tonight's cocktail  - Cynaro de Bergerac. I can't say why, but I didn't enjoy it as much as I'm sure I have before.  Nothing wrong with it, though.


Leslie Craven, aka "lesliec"
Host, eG Forumslcraven@egstaff.org

After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relatives ~ Oscar Wilde

My eG Foodblog

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Le Gigot Flip

80f8a8c9b6fccd324bf785c5f215d2d1c83ac9e3.jpg

 

I didn't put enough sugar so it was quite dry and also considering the Santa Teresa rum which is not the sweetest one.

It was pleasant but I found the cherry notes to be rather discreet.
The texture was interesting, it was my first flip

 

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On 2/3/2016 at 9:21 AM, FrogPrincesse said:

Smoked Julep (Phil Ward) with Laphroaig 10 (subbed for the 12), Daron XO Calvados (instead of Laird's apple brandy), maple syrup. Like a very smoky apple. Similar to the Shruff's End in Julep form, and with less flourish.

 

24158410283_79617c1692_c.jpg

 

 

 

I been enjoying following your posts.  Thank you for sharing them and the information.  I did find this one interesting and will be giving it a try.  

 

 

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This was a touch sweet, but I liked the tiki-esque vibe of this Old Fashioned cocktail a lot, especially on a cold and gray evening.

 

Four in Hand (Scott Teague) with High West American Prairie bourbon, Boulard VSOP calvados, Smith & Cross Jamaican rum, green Chartreuse, BJ Reynolds vanilla & homemade cinnamon syrups.

 

Four in Hand (Scott Teague) with High West American Prairie bourbon, Boulard VSOP calvados, Smith & Cross Jamaican rum, green Chartreuse, vanilla & cinnamon syrups #deathandco

 

 

 

 

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On 10/28/2016 at 5:08 AM, ananth said:

Le Gigot Flip

 

I didn't put enough sugar so it was quite dry and also considering the Santa Teresa rum which is not the sweetest one.

It was pleasant but I found the cherry notes to be rather discreet.
The texture was interesting, it was my first flip

 

Along those lines the Dickens Flip (with 1/2 an ounce of Angostura bitters) is nice, too. The bitters reinforce the cherry flavor to my palate. 

Beta Cocktails' Heering Flip is also similar, that one with a fat 1/2 ounce of Xocolatl Mole bitters! I haven't gotten to that one yet.

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I've really got to try those kind of recipes which ask for 1/2 or 1 oz of angostura bitters

the Trinidad sour seems to be really interesting

however, I'd find difficult to use 1/2 an ounce of Xocolatl Mole bitters :D

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9 hours ago, ananth said:

I've really got to try those kind of recipes which ask for 1/2 or 1 oz of angostura bitters

the Trinidad sour seems to be really interesting

however, I'd find difficult to use 1/2 an ounce of Xocolatl Mole bitters :D

It's not difficult and it's quite good. It's actually a great drink when the weather is colder - think hot chocolate.

 

For more bitters-heavy drinks, check out this thread too.

 

 

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Brian Miller's Bumboo again, this time with Flor de Cana 12 (and demerara syrup, vanilla syrup, Peychaud's bitters, Abbott's bitters, Jerry Thomas' bitters, grated nutmeg). This rum strikes a good balance between sweetness and spice. It should work great in tiki drinks (and was recommended in Smuggler's Cove cocktail book).

 

Bumboo (Brian Miller) with Flor de Cana 12, Demerara syrup, vanilla syrup, Peychaud's bitters, Abbott's bitters, Jerry Thomas' bitters, grated nutmeg #cocktail #cocktails #craftcocktails #rum

 

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Howl on the Hill (Jessica Gonzalez) with El Dorado 8 year demerara rum (substituted for the 15 year), Flor de Cana 12 (substituted for Santa Teresa 1796), Margerum amaro (instead of Carpano Antica - they are very different but I still loved the result), Fernet-Branca, yellow Chartreuse, St. George absinthe (instead of Vieux Pontarlier). This is a bit like a rum cousin of a cocktail I love, the Hanky Panky (gin + sweet vermouth + fernet-branca).

 

Howl on the Hill (Jessica Gonzalez) with El Dorado 8 year demerara rum, Flor de Cana 12, Margerum amaro, Fernet-Branca, yellow Chartreuse, St. George absinthe #cocktail #cocktails #craftcocktails #rum #deathandco #chartreuse #absinthe #fernetbranca

 

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I've had this book on my kindle for a while now and love it.  Obviously it is unrealistic to think that a home bar could replicate the recipes in this book, it would cost you *thousands* in booze to do so.  However, using their recipes as a guideline has been a lot of fun.  Their infusions are spectacular...especially the jalapeno infused tequila.

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1 hour ago, edgarallanpoe said:

I've had this book on my kindle for a while now and love it.  Obviously it is unrealistic to think that a home bar could replicate the recipes in this book, it would cost you *thousands* in booze to do so.  However, using their recipes as a guideline has been a lot of fun.  Their infusions are spectacular...especially the jalapeno infused tequila.

 

I don't think any of these books are written under the assumption that all the recipes can be replicated at any given time by any one person, but certainly there are plenty of drinks in this book that can be replicated for far less than thousands of dollars in booze.

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On 2/7/2017 at 9:24 AM, sbumgarner said:

 

I don't think any of these books are written under the assumption that all the recipes can be replicated at any given time by any one person, but certainly there are plenty of drinks in this book that can be replicated for far less than thousands of dollars in booze.

 

That is exactly my point...some might think that this book is a recipe book.  I suppose in some respects it is exactly that.  But IMHO it is *much* more useful as a guide with which to experiment and create your own concoctions.  That isn't to say that the recipes aren't fantastic, they are and I use them often.  But I have had a lot more fun reading their explanations on *why* they do the things they do and *why* they use the ingredients they do.

 

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