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Shel_B

You Like Popcorn, Don't You...

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Not having a microwave, I've always popped corn on the stove top.   And I've been able to purchase some nice heirloom popping corn at the green markets as well.

 

I do want to try some of this corn mentioned in the article, and will be on the lookout for it my next trip to Whole Foods.


Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

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We are popcorn lovers although in our neck of the woods, we can't buy much of any speciality (which has its positive side).  Wednesday supper is popcorn and my Orange Julep recipe.  DH eats his in the traditional fashion with salt and butter, but mine has olive oil, pepper and ground chipotle and a touch of sugar.  The dogs like Ed's better than mine.


Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

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I love popcorn, especially with cheese and herbs on it. Sadly, I am not allowed to eat it any more.

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The small kernel, so called "hull-less" types, are the only ones my wife can eat. Funny, I was just in Iowa and didn't see any for sale. But I don't look that hard because the week before I bought a 2lb bag in Wisconsin. I have looked for it in my local Whole Foods, but they don't carry it, so it appears not all stores have it.

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Thanks for the link.  I enjoyed the article. 

I like popcorn but always remember the comment of a French post-doc in my group:  "Ugh, popcorn:  it has no taste and just a horrible smell!" 

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I just bought some of that small and mighty popcorn on the clearance rack at TJ Maxx.  3.00( marked down from 5.99).  It was good, but not mind blowing.  I popped it in one of those new type poppers( uses oil). 

 

Would you buy it again? I would try it (at the price you found it) but not sure I would pay some of the Amazon prices. 

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Personally, I'm interested in some sorghum seeds. They apparently "pop" just like corn, but look like a micro version, and are just slightly inherently sweet...

 

I honestly hate popcorn, but am curious to find out what other seeds may "pop" in a similar manner.....


I'm a lifelong professional chef. If that doesn't explain some of my mental and emotional quirks, maybe you should see a doctor, and have some of yours examined...

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Personally, I'm interested in some sorghum seeds. They apparently "pop" just like corn, but look like a micro version, and are just slightly inherently sweet...

 

I honestly hate popcorn, but am curious to find out what other seeds may "pop" in a similar manner.....

 

Go to an Indian grocery.  They will most likely have the seeds but undoubtedly will have a package of pre-popped sorghum.

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For better or worse, I'll be doing it myself haha

If Andrew Zimmern can watch it being done, I can likely do it...


I'm a lifelong professional chef. If that doesn't explain some of my mental and emotional quirks, maybe you should see a doctor, and have some of yours examined...

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Thanks for the link.  I enjoyed the article. 

I like popcorn but always remember the comment of a French post-doc in my group:  "Ugh, popcorn:  it has no taste and just a horrible smell!"

Wasn't me but it could have been! Rarely go to movie theaters because the smell.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

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Wasn't me but it could have been! Rarely go to movie theaters because the smell.

And conversely, I can rarely get past the popcorn because of the smell.

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I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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For better or worse, I'll be doing it myself haha

If Andrew Zimmern can watch it being done, I can likely do it...

Sorry if you misunderstood. They will likely have the seeds that you can pop yourself, but they always seem to have a bag of pre-popped. That would be a way of seeing if you like the flavor without having to track down the seeds.

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I have to try the wild rice popcorn issue for myself.  :smile:

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Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

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I'm thinking the same thing, Darienne. Heaven knows I have enough of the stuff around. What would you think: parched, or not parched, for popping?

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

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We eat a lot of popcorn. Mostly we buy organic bulk popcorn and we always pop it on the stovetop. The smell is intoxicating to me, but only with good oil used. Canola never smells good. My husband is doing most of the popping these days and he has been using Grapeseed oil, which I think smells very nice. The smell of microwave popcorn however is really unappealing to me. Over the years I've tried various gadgets for popping corn and my conclusion is that a simple pot on the stove is as good or better than any of them. That artisanal corn sounds interesting, and worth a try, but if you are regular popcorn consumers, Tiny but Mighty at $9 per pound is a bit steep, when you can buy organic in bulk for less than $2 per pound. Great idea for a gift, though, if you have friends or relatives who are into popcorn.

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That's a pretty good article but for a few misconceptions.

 

I grew Tom Thumb and Strawberry heirloom popcorn for many years...as well as a few others.

The flavor is definitely MUCH better than the flavor of the puffy, voluminous hybrids.


~Martin :)

"Unsupervised, rebellious, radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader, and adventurous cook. Crotchety, cantankerous, terse, curmudgeon, non-conformist, and contrarian who questions everything!"

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

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Popped Wild Rice

Popped wild rice can be used as an interesting replacement for croutons in a salad, or as a garnish on soups, and casseroles. Not all wild rice will pop successfully. The best wild rice to use is hand processed wild rice that usually has more moisture left in each kernel, which will expand when heated.

Place about ½ inch of oil in a small, shallow pan with a small strainer set in the oil. Heat at high temperature until oil is at about 450 F. Drop one rice kernel into the strainer. When it sizzles, cracks open and expands to about double its length, the oil is ready. (You may wish to reduce the heat temporarily.) Add 1 tablespoon of rice at a time to the oil. When all the kernels have expanded (which constitutes the popping), empty the strainer onto paper toweling. Repeat, adjusting heat as necessary. Crisp popped rice may be seasoned with salt, pepper, and mixed herbs to enhance the flavor. This popped rice can be made in large quantities and stored in a sealed container for several weeks.

 

From   http://wildrice.mb.ca/recipes/

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sparrowgrass

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The small kernel, so called "hull-less" types, are the only ones my wife can eat. Funny, I was just in Iowa and didn't see any for sale. But I don't look that hard because the week before I bought a 2lb bag in Wisconsin. I have looked for it in my local Whole Foods, but they don't carry it, so it appears not all stores have it.

Bought some today in  a local bulk foodstore.  Costs twice as much as regular popcorn and has no hulls.  Called "White Popcorn".

It was passable...but...lacked heft and chew.  It was nice not to struggle with the hulls, but I don't think we'll bother again.  Just too tame.

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Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

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