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gfron1

Buying Japanese Knives Online

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@rotuts, those knives are gorgeous, and I wish you many years of enjoyment! I have a question, however.  Above, you indicate that the handles are horn.  They look like wood in the photos.  Is that fine, tight grain an artifact of the photos, or did your eccentric keypad mistype the word? I didn't know horn could look like that.


Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
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1 hour ago, Smithy said:

@rotuts, those knives are gorgeous, and I wish you many years of enjoyment! I have a question, however.  Above, you indicate that the handles are horn.  They look like wood in the photos.  Is that fine, tight grain an artifact of the photos, or did your eccentric keypad mistype the word? I didn't know horn could look like that.

 

@Smithy the ferrules are horn, handles are wood.

 

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I took a picture of the engraving on my Watanabe knife that is more clear.

 

IMG_4124.thumb.JPG.ceaca4f7343c242bbfcccc1e9b840171.JPG


Nick Reynolds, aka "nickrey"

"The Internet is full of false information." Plato
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I asked about the engraving

 

indeed it is a signature :

 

"  The engraving is my signature. "Shin Ichi Saku" means made by Shinichi. "

 


 @Smithy 

 

the handles are wood ,  probably chestnut.

 

"  octagonal shaped Enju handle with horn hilt "

 

from the web page       I asked for light colored wood that matched as best as possible

 

Im delighted w the result.

 

Im keen on the two smaller Nakkiri     but the have a plastic hilt

 

if the plastic doesn't bother me , I might get them both w a light colored handle similar to the two I have.

 

we are exchanging emails.   

 

as Ive said , more knives I don't need.

 

however , the two I now have  

 

have the most extraordinary feel in my hand   and cutting with them feel very different than the knives i have.

 

and my knives are very sharp and have thin steel    both the globals and the ones from Granton in GB

 

http://www.granton-knives.co.uk

 

Grantons I have that I use frequently , to compare :

 

598d325ba3fa7_Grantons.thumb.jpg.fd2104dc2ea958e3787a16bc8df5e1cd.jpg


Edited by rotuts (log)
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6 hours ago, rotuts said:

as Ive said , more knives I don't need.

Of course you don't need more knives. I don't need more knives. What has that got to do with anything?xDxDxD

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

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On 8/9/2017 at 1:53 PM, gulator said:

I'have a Yoshihiro Mizu Yaki Yoshihiro Mizu Yaki Blue High Carbon Steel Black Damascus Kiritsuke Japanese Multipurpose Chef Knife 8.25 In with Nuri Saya Cover very high quality, got it from a Japanese chef, friend of mine. Best :B

would appreciate a link to your friend's own website even if it is in Japanese. I'd like to see source info. Looks interesting. Thanks.


Edited by Smithy Adjusted Amazon link (log)

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@Anna N 

On 11/08/2017 at 11:27 AM, Anna N said:

Of course you don't need more knives. I don't need more knives. What has that got to do with anything?xDxDxD

I don't need more anything, but that hasn't stopped me. My only limitation now apart from cost is space. So after reading @rotuts post I thought I could slip another small item in. I followed Rotuts down that same rabbit hole. 

I am now awaiting my Gyuto and sheath. It's about to leave Japan on it's way to me. I can't wait. I'm also waiting for an amazon delivery of another cookbook, I.P. Inner pot and a few other bits.

Aren't we lucky to be us:rolleyes: D.

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The gyuto has arrived with it's Saya. I'm delighted with it.

A question I have. Do any of you owners of the Saya cover use any further oil treatment on it. 

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@Doofa 

 

Id love to read more about your Gyuto

 

and see some pics .

 

where did you get it ?

 

I have two smaller Nakkiri's coming from Watanabe.

 

I hesitated for a long as I could.

 

but the two I have are such a delight  I got these two .

 

I tend to use a smaller knife than I should , I can't say why

 

the right knife is right next to the one I tend to use.

 

these two are someware in the NYC area over the weekend , and I expect to get them

 

sometime mid-next week.

 

I also took EdgePros advice and got a new 1000 grit stone and a 2300 polishing stone

 

( not a tape )

 

just for these knives.

 

I know I won't regret it

 

Ill just Toss and Turn All Night for a while.

 

the knives these replace will find good homes

 

Ill make sure.

 

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@rotuts Sorry for delay. Knife is from Watanabe. I got put onto them after reading a post by you about import duty. I jumped down that "rabbit hole" and popped ups having bought one. I'm virtually besotted with it. I now need a sharpening regime/system so am looking for advice from these boards. After a couple of days it claimed its first casualty...my finger. I have a superstition that any knife I have will have to cut me before I can master it. IMG_2242.thumb.JPG.0a33a1d41d13ce59e6998b73a2ba815c.JPG 

I'm leaning towards a sharpening system as I'm not much good freehand. I also need to understand why my ceramic Honing steel is out. 

I'll try post a shot now ( this is a first )                             IMG_2275.thumb.jpg.48841489a5fdcf6cb9f7511b83f83b38.jpgIMG_2291.thumb.JPG.7bc61c214a991eb3d6f3a38463ce0426.JPG

This one needs rotating and not sure how.

I opted for the D shaped handle as I have learnt from my Shuns that they feel a better grip in my hands.

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@Doofa 

 

is that the Santoku ?

 

the Watanabe knives are things of great beauty 

 

Id advise you to look into the EdgePro system , with 1000grit and a polishing stone for these knives.

 

I think I posted their recommendations above somewhere.

 

also re- think your cutting board

 

Ive been using these for a long time :

 

https://www.bedbathandbeyond.com/store/product/oxo-good-grips-reg-21-inch-x-15-inch-carving-and-cutting-board/1014949216?Keyword=cutting+board

 

they are inexpensive and very forgiving of your knives edge.  Watanabe or not.

 

the W knives sure are sharp !

 

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my mistake

 

its a Gyuto .   180 mm ?

 

these knives are so stunning !

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@rotuts Thanks for the rotation. I have a variety of cutting boards and two very large polythene(?) catering boards which are my fav for use with my better knives, Shun, Tojiro and now the Watanabe. Several composite boards make up the rest. I'm very picky about my boards and knives. 

Correct it is the Gyuto 180mm and the stone its on is reclaimed sandstone from a very old cottage. 

I am looking into the Edge pro system as you suggested. Currently I have a similar Lansky system and was wondering if there was a favourable comparison between the two systems. Yes they are stunning and I suspect it won't be my last purchase. 

The silly pic in the middle is my pathetic take on the "Bourdain" chef jacket moniker. I'd like that as a header on my notepaper but have never seen it a avatar type picture.

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There are so many beautiful knives in this thread, I don't know where to start. You guys are ballers.

 

I just went on the start of what I hope will be a short buying spree of Japanese carbon steel knives. For years, Globals have been my go-to knives for most tasks. As I understand it, Global was one of the first major Japanese manufacturers to break through in the US, which makes sense considering that their knives are soft and stainless and mostly double-edged. I've liked mine while I've had them, but I'm anticipating a serious change in my cutting and slicing world. Up until now, everything has been stainless and everything has been stamped. My go-to Globals are the 8" G-2, a 6" nakiri-ish style veg knife, and (most recently) a 270mm chef's knife (that was probably my best knife purchase thus far). I also have a bunch of Wustof that I inherited from my parents (who upgraded, not passed on) though I mostly use the santoku. 

 

Anyway, I've always wanted a yanagiba. I don't make sushi, and I seldom work with fish. But on those rare occasions when I want to slice fish like I want to slice fish.... that is the knife I dream of. And when Yoshohiro started their recent yanagi promotion, I picked up their cheapest 300mm white steel #2 with saya. It will be here Saturday, but from what I can gather, it's sort of an absurdly inexpensive knife of its type given the quality. I paid $234 for a 12" forged blade... and it comes with a saya? I mean... shut up and take my money.

 

Then I got to thinking. I've never had a pairing knife -- or short blade -- that I really gelled with. My current pairing knife is a Wusthof, which is fine and all, but I never want to reach for it for anything. And then I came across a 105mm petty from Chef Knives To Go. It's only $60. Who could say "no"?

 

At this point, my mind started racing. What did I need? One thing I've always wanted was a longer petty - something that was thin and agile and thin (ish... something tall enough for some board clearance). And that's when I found her. A 6-inch double-edged super blue petty from Yoshihiro. Good lord. What have I done? My only problem was that it didn't come with a saya. So I fired off an e-mail, and they replied that their knife-maker would gladly make me a custom lacquered saya to fit that blade. For the low, low price of $25. I couldn't fill out the Paypal invoice fast enough... SHUT UP AND TAKE MY MONEY!

 

I have a few more blades on my radar. But I think I'm going to play it cool for right now and see how I adapt to the new steels. I know that I'll have to adjust my cleaning and drying regimen, but that's not a huge deal. A few years ago, ChefSteps launched a knife sharpening class, which prompted me to buy a whole buncha stones and whatnot. And I love, love, love how the Globals perform fresh off the stones. But they're super soft by Japanese standards, and I hate how quickly they lose their edge (though the Hi-Soft cutting board I purchased recently is a godsend in this regard). I'm hoping that I can sharpen up my super blue petty and keep an edge (using the hi-soft) for a week or so of casual cooking.

 

We'll see what happens. 

 

Pictures to come.


Edited by btbyrd (log)
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@btbyrd just a couple of thoughts. First, I absolutely adore my Fujiwara wa-petty from Bernal Cutlery. I know you already have one so I'm just sharing this for the good of the cause, but this guy is the lambourghini of small knives in my kit. Every time I let someone hold it they literally gasp at the balance on it. This, btw, was the knife that a cook grabbed to pry open a coconut at one of my events and had the tip in the coconut before I screamed across the kitchen for her to stop. No damage was done except my life shortened by a few years.

 

The other thing I wanted to share was about sayas. Read up on the difference between a regular saya and a compression fit. Compression fits are made tight enough that the knife won't slide out of the saya on its own. My first compression fit was done by a young artisan who didn't get it quite right...how do I know?...because it broke the tip off of my gyuto. I generally have paid $10-25 for regular and $35-50 for compressions (depending on the wood). I think its worth it for a compression but only if you know the maker is experienced.

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14 hours ago, gfron1 said:

@btbyrd just a couple of thoughts. First, I absolutely adore my Fujiwara wa-petty from Bernal Cutlery. I know you already have one so I'm just sharing this for the good of the cause, but this guy is the lambourghini of small knives in my kit. Every time I let someone hold it they literally gasp at the balance on it....

 

Great knife! Funny that you compared it to a Lambo... one reviewer of the petty I bought from Yoshihiro compared theirs to a Ferrar, asking "did you ever hear about someone cleaning out an decrepit barn and finding a priceless vintage Ferrari hidden beneath an old tarp? This is that Ferrari, and the black Kurouchi tarp has been lifted just enough to reveal a cutting edge so incredible it's going to leave you grinning ear-to-ear, like you just did 0-60 mph in 3.2 seconds." Well, mine won't be here for another week or so, but I'm starting to expect some epic Italian performance from my Japanese steel. xD

 

Also, thanks for conveying your experience with sayas. I wasn't aware of the difference between compression and non-compression sayas, so that's something to be on the watch for in the future.

 

 Right now, I'm just trying to stop myself from buying a nakiri, kiritsuke, and burly Western-style deba. It's hard work.

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9 hours ago, btbyrd said:

 Right now, I'm just trying to stop myself from buying a nakiri, kiritsuke, and burly Western-style deba. It's hard work.

And so then let me give you my experience as a knife addict. As many here know I went on a binge after getting my JBF nom. I had done ungodly hours for so long with no treats for myself, and so I decided to buy a "nice" knife as a reward. That nice knife led to over a dozen knives. All belong in that Italian performance sports car showroom. And while each gets time on the cutting board, as has been said a thousand times in this and other forums, I really only need a great gyuto, a pairing or wa-petty and maybe a solid meat chopper. 90% of my usage goes to my Carter gyuto, my Fuji wa-petty and Kato Nikiri. In the meantime, I have to secure, transport and maintain my whole set, and keep a detailed inventory for insurance purposes. I don't regret it, but that money and mental energy could have gone somewhere else. I actually much prefer helping friends find new knives for their sets as an outlet for my energies nowadays.


Edited by gfron1 (log)
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Yes

 

looking into Japanese knives is a bit like falling into a rabbit hole.

 

however , with some thought and patience its well worth it

 

just make sure you can properly care for them as they are quite different than western knives.

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Don't mean to go off topic:

Knife making can take you years of learning and practicing. 

Or you can have a very useful knife made cheaply, if you have a few simple tools.

 

Since I didn't want to spend $500; A knife I made: a 330mm single bevel yanagiba.

  • $20.00 tool steel (D-2 steel) on ebay. Tool steel can be excellent for kitchen knives. Tool Steel is made for cutting steel. 
  • Shape the steel with an angle grinder into a blade you want ( you can buy an angle grinder from HarborF for less than$20 if you don't have one)
  • Send to have the blade cryo-hardened and tempered ($20)
  • Sharpen the hardened blade yourself, add handle.

dcarch

59ce60a99bd95_longknife.thumb.jpg.aa0584c3dc7ed1566d7d6189094b896b.jpg


Edited by dcarch (log)
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5 hours ago, gfron1 said:

And so then let me give you my experience as a knife addict. As many here know I went on a binge after getting my JBF nom. I had done ungodly hours for so long with no treats for myself, and so I decided to buy a "nice" knife as a reward. That nice knife led to over a dozen knives. All belong in that Italian performance sports car showroom. And while each gets time on the cutting board, as has been said a thousand times in this and other forums, I really only need a great gyuto, a pairing or wa-petty and maybe a solid meat chopper. 90% of my usage goes to my Carter gyuto, my Fuji wa-petty and Kato Nikiri. In the meantime, I have to secure, transport and maintain my whole set, and keep a detailed inventory for insurance purposes. I don't regret it, but that money and mental energy could have gone somewhere else. I actually much prefer helping friends find new knives for their sets as an outlet for my energies nowadays.

 

 

Thanks for sharing your experience! While I'm going on a bit of a binge, I have a strategy that basically is to (1) buy knife-styles that fill gaps in my present setup that (2) are the least expensive version you can buy that doesn't have fit and finish issues or major problems with the grind. Like you, I use two or three knives for 90% of kitchen tasks, and I don't want to spend a ton of money and eat up a lot of space to buy redundant blades or things that I'd never really need. At the moment, I don't really have any petty knifes that I like, so the 105 and 150mm ones I ordered will be a welcome addition for smaller tasks. I have a Global "nakiri" that I use all the time for veg, but it's small and doesn't have the rectangular blade typical of many knifes in the style. And you can pick up a beautiful blue steel nakiri for not a ton of money. The thing that I keep going back and forth on is whether or not to get a usuba instead, but I figure that if I really need to do things that single-bevel excels at (like sheeting vegetables) I can always give it a try with the yanagi. 


Really, the only knives that are high on my radar are a nakiri/usuba and either a gyuto or a kiritsuke as an alternative to my nice-but-pedestrian Global 8" and 11" chefs knives. I'm leaning toward this kiritsuke and this nakiri. That nakiri has been on my Amazon wishlist for literally years. 

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On 10/1/2017 at 4:01 AM, btbyrd said:

300mm white steel yanagi.

 

...............I should never read your posts Brandon, anywhere.

 

Rosewood Handle?


Edited by adey73 (log)
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“Do you not find that bacon, sausage, egg, chips, black pudding, beans, mushrooms, tomatoes, fried bread and a cup of tea; is a meal in itself really?” Hovis Presley.

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