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Corned chicken breast (chicken ham)


FeChef
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9 minutes ago, ElsieD said:

@FeChef  I have separated the breasts.  One more question, please - what is meat glue and where do you get it?  If you don't mind me saying so, it sounds a little gross.

Transglutaminase. An enzyme that links proteins together.  Amazon has it. It's fun.

eG has threads on using it.

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41 minutes ago, ElsieD said:

@FeChef  I have separated the breasts.  One more question, please - what is meat glue and where do you get it?  If you don't mind me saying so, it sounds a little gross.

I bet a lot of people thought cooking meat in a bag at low temps below what the USDA says is safe was gross too.

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I played with transglutaminase back in the 1960's.  In those days folks typically purified transglutaminase from their blood so you might say it was a little gross.  On the other hand who needs amazon?

 

 

 

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Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

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if you SV the corned CkBr after the cure

 

and tie them together , they pretty much stick together after the cooking.

 

its important to remove the string , which sometimes gets a little buried in the meat

 

before you slice and eat.

 

from a lot of experience w tied together  ( due to removal of the two tendons ) turkey Br

 

the sting does not SV very well , and stays  tough  , and well , stingy .

Edited by rotuts (log)
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5 hours ago, rotuts said:

if you SV the corned CkBr after the cure

 

and tie them together , they pretty much stick together after the cooking.

 

its important to remove the string , which sometimes gets a little buried in the meat

 

before you slice and eat.

 

from a lot of experience w tied together  ( due to removal of the two tendons ) turkey Br

 

the sting does not SV very well , and stays  tough  , and well , stingy .

 

 

This is all true.

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if you choose to use Transglutaminase

 

make sure you  understand some minimal safety precautions :

 

its a powder , and you dont want to inhale any of it.

 

a surgical mask or something of the sort

 

was a wise precaution , and maybe disposable gloves.

 

back BeforeNow  you could get these inexpensive items anywhere.

 

not so much Now.

 

 

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I looked at the prices on Amazon.ca for transglutaminase and it's expensive so I don't think I'll be getting any.  Plus there seem to be different ones and I wouldn't know which one to get.  What sort of a retail place might have it?  Would a butcher shop use it and if so, would they sell me just a little bit?

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Repeating what was written upthread, if you tie several pieces of meat together and poach or roast them, they will more or less bond into one piece.   IMHO, far better with this minimum intervention than with a chemical bond.    But then i don't go in for modernist techniques. 

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eGullet member #80.

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14 minutes ago, ElsieD said:

I looked at the prices on Amazon.ca for transglutaminase and it's expensive so I don't think I'll be getting any.  Plus there seem to be different ones and I wouldn't know which one to get.  What sort of a retail place might have it?  Would a butcher shop use it and if so, would they sell me just a little bit?

This is purely my opinion backed up by zero expertise. I would say no most butcher shops would not carry it and if they did would be unlikely to sell you any.  If memory serves me well the use of transglutaminase was frowned upon for safety reasons. With the right expertise it could be safely used but I don’t think it is anything that we amateurs should fool around with. YMMV. It all sounded so exciting back in the day.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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the T really works for rolled-meats , and compound meats sold in a deli like place.

 

they are selling an attractive shape  ( many sizes ) and want it to stay that way

 

before and after slicing.

 

butchers these days dont do much butchering in the sense that if there is aService Counter

 

they get " Boxed Meat " and break that down , saving all timing for the House Service Counter

 

ground meat.

 

this article has a lot of info :

 

https://delishably.com/food-industry/Meat-Glue-What-It-Is-And-What-You-Should-Know

 

Im not so sure on their health analysis.

 

quite some time ago ,

 

an occasional poster posted his method of

 

1) de-boning a pork shoulder , and removing most of the sinews

 

2) seasoning the meat and using meat glue , made a tube.

 

3) SV'd that tube

 

4) sliced thin , and added a cube of Italian Dressing

 

Fz  them

 

for what he said was the beat ever italian sub.

 

I believe it !

 

can't find the ref.

 

😪

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ok.

 

so many other pressing issues in these " Interesting Times "

 

Noon in la belle France ?

 

I lived there for 2 years when young

 

as I did in Spain

 

Noon in FR is for me :

 

6:00 AM Thursday

 

wow , I can now Enjoy a Person Beverage 

 

when I get up , or Before !

 

MC , the Cat determines  when I get up

 

he has not been to FR

 

and his Personal Beverage is Water

 

but w Global Warming

 

when its So Hot

 

he enjoys some Fish Pate   [ Firskeis }  \

 

w some water added

 

in the Old France 

 

'50's  

 

a hard boiled egg

 

on the counter at the local

 

Bar / Espresso establishment

 

forgot the name of this

 

an espresso , a boiled egg from the counter

 

and small cognac 

 

fueled the Agrarian France

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3 hours ago, Margaret Pilgrim said:

Repeating what was written upthread, if you tie several pieces of meat together and poach or roast them, they will more or less bond into one piece.   IMHO, far better with this minimum intervention than with a chemical bond.    But then i don't go in for modernist techniques. 

 

Transglutaminase is perfectly natural...you would not be here without it.

 

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Cooking is cool.  And kitchen gear is even cooler.  -- Chad Ward

 

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13 minutes ago, JoNorvelleWalker said:

 

Transglutaminase is perfectly natural...you would not be here without it.

 

So are mosquitoes, Gila monsters, earwigs and horse manure. Don’t fancy any of them in my pantry. 😂

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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@JoNorvelleWalker

 

you have a fine Point

 

My TG's are my own

 

processed TG's

 

have something I do not have :

 

the processing 

 

I try to save , use less electricity etc

 

but ConAgra and AgraCon

 

has no interest what ever to tell you 

 

everthing.

 

so I use Kitchen Twine 

 

also from ConAgra  and AgraCon.

 

the Ball is Rolling

 

and the Pitch is Coming

 

hopefully 

 

w/o calling the signs 

 

in advance

 

 

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Kitchen twine  You are really fancy-shmancy.    I save string from laundry packages, tying each week's length onto a ball.    Figure it all gets cooked anyway.     Son, who apparently missed receiving the thrift gene, needed some string and was surprised by a knot at the end of a 10ft length,    He looked at it for an instant and said, "Tell me you aren't saving string from the laundry..."     Shrug.    (Not sure if was Gallic but it spoke volumes.)

Edited by Margaret Pilgrim (log)
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eGullet member #80.

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I don't know if it's generational or cultural/geographic, but I don't grasp the use of string in laundry (unless perhaps as an emergency DIY clothesline).

“Who loves a garden, loves a greenhouse too.” - William Cowper, The Task, Book Three

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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