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David Ross

eG Cook-Off #67: Apples

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Not cooked, if it counts, but tonight's dinner here is Honeycrisp.  Much of the year Honeycrisp apples are rather sad at best, but last week and this week they have been most beautiful.

 

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I had two apples for dinner! Also uncooked. An extra Golden Delicious from the batch I bought for making the Tarte Tatin and my new favorite variety, the Envy. I haven't cooked with the Envy but it is a bit soft so don't know how it would do. Probably in a recipe like applesauce or compote. But it is not too sweet and good as an eating apple.

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We are 'blessed"(?) once again with a surfeit of apples on our Mac and more than we expected on the Northern Spy.  Both trees are in our designated back yard.  We have at least another 20 apple trees on our 100 acres.  Some you wouldn't want to eat.  Some are delicious.  They come from the other farmhouse on the second of what was originally two 50-acre parcels.   

 

OK.  So we've given away tons of them.  Made apple sauce (Arey's Mother's friend's cake to come), apple juice, apple leather, dried apple slices...oh let this be over...but it ain't.  

 

Just found a recipe for Apple Chips and that's next.  All the problems of Apple Leather and Dried Apple Slices gone in the blink of an eye.   

 

Let the making of the chips begin.  

 

(No, I don't like making pies.  I'm not adept at pastry.)

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Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

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We have the annual family bocce tournament today in Mayberly.  A SIL always brings me apples from her trees.  No one knows what kind they are, the trees are very old.  I make apple butter and applesauce for one if my sisters and me.  Great stuff.

 

Edited to add:  I make lousy pastry too so I avoid making it.


Edited by ElsieD (log)
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44 minutes ago, ElsieD said:

We have the annual family bocce tournament today in Mayberly.  A SIL always brings me apples from her trees.  No one knows what kind they are, the trees are very old.  I make apple butter and applesauce for one if my sisters and me.  Great stuff.

 

Edited to add:  I make lousy pastry too so I avoid making it.

 

Now multiply that amount by a gazillion and you have it!  We have two large freezers plus two fridge freezers.  The second freezer is nominally for the dogs (100 pounds each and they eat real food) and a second fridge because our son lived with us for a few years.  And everything is full, full, full.  I have threatened dire consequences if Ed brings home on more 'good buy'.  Like the huge Christmas turkey which is in there, taking up much room...etc...etc.... (just ranting....)

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Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

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Apple crumble pie.  I don't know what kind of apple they are, they came from my SIL's trees and the trees are very old.  They are a fairly tart apple, almost pure white on the inside.  I will make applesauce with the rest as I like to use that in place of oil when I make muffins.

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4 hours ago, ElsieD said:

Apple crumble pie.  I don't know what kind of apple they are, they came from my SIL's trees and the trees are very old.  They are a fairly tart apple, almost pure white on the inside.  I will make applesauce with the rest as I like to use that in place of oil when I make muffins.

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Cortland perhaps?

 

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4 hours ago, ElsieD said:

Apple crumble pie.  I don't know what kind of apple they are, they came from my SIL's trees and the trees are very old.  They are a fairly tart apple, almost pure white on the inside.  I will make applesauce with the rest as I like to use that in place of oil when I make muffins.

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20191020_172620.jpg

 

Not a pie girl - but that speaks to me in a good way :)

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10 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

Cortland perhaps?

 

That was my first thought as well, as they're very white on the interior and make a good pie. They're my go-to, if I'm making a pie from a single variety (I often combine them for broader flavor). It's hard to tell by appearance, because Cortlands from some trees are all red, like the ones in the image, but more often they're streaked with green or half-and-half. I've been to the U-pick twice in the past few weeks, so this is all fresh in my head. :)

 

On yesterday's trip I also got the season's last bag of Dudleys from one grower. They're a 19th-century variety that's popular in Maine and parts of NB, but which I had not previously seen. Looking forward to trying those.

 

In recent weeks I've made dehydrated rings for the grandkids, replenished my store of applesauce, made a couple of apple cakes to share with the neighbours, apple crisp at my GF's request and an apple pie for (Canadian) Thanksgiving. None of them unusual or notable in any way, and no photos to show (I really need to start using my actual camera one day...).

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“What is called sound economics is very often what mirrors the needs of the respectably affluent.” - John Kenneth Galbraith

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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Hard to believe we are the nation's top apple producers here in Washington, but until this year we hadn't cultivated an apple in the state.  Washington State University created the "Cosmic Crisp" which is just now in markets.  From what I've read it takes years to cultivate a new apple so I'm sure they've been at it for a while.  They will own exclusive rights to sell the apple for 10 years.  I haven't seen it yet, but it's described as a cross between the Enterprise and the Honeycrisp.  They say that it has a long shelf life and does well stored in the fridge. It's best for eating they say with a good balance of sweet and tart and very crisp.  I'll try to buy some when it shows up locally.  It's already in markets in the Seattle and Yakima areas.

Cosmic Crisp Apples.jpg

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There was an article on the Cosmic Crisp in the LATimes the other day: Move over, Honeycrisp: New Cosmic Crisp apple to debut at grocery stores

It noted:

Quote

Already, growers have planted 12 million Cosmic Crisp apple trees, a sign of confidence in the new variety. Although only 450,000 40-pound boxes will be available for sale this year, that will jump to more than 2 million boxes in 2020 and more than 21 million by 2026.

...

The trees take three years to produce a crop, said Kathryn Grandy, a member of the team marketing the apple.

“This will be the largest launch of a single variety ever, globally,” she said, and it’s backed by a $10.5-million marketing budget.

 

I'll keep an eye out to see if any of them make their way down here.  

Meanwhile, I'm still eating some of the Macs I bought when I was back in northern NY a few weeks ago.  I can buy Macs at the local farmers market here in So Cal but they're never as good as the ones from home!

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On 10/19/2019 at 10:26 AM, Darienne said:

 

Just found a recipe for Apple Chips and that's next.  All the problems of Apple Leather and Dried Apple Slices gone in the blink of an eye.   

The Apple Chips turned out to be more trouble than the dehydrated slices and so I've turned back to making the slices.  I was wondering how on earth we were going to eat all those apple slices when the problem was suddenly solved.  I began to give away bags of them.  To the garage guys, to the vet techs.  

 

The response has been overwhelming.  Folks just LOVE them.    I shall give away more.  And to my great surprise, the garage owner, a somewhat laconic type, phoned me this evening to find out how to make them.  And one of the vet techs is trying to keep her weight down and thinks they are wonderful.  

 

A new gift to give.  Hooray! 

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Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

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15 hours ago, David Ross said:

Hard to believe we are the nation's top apple producers here in Washington, but until this year we hadn't cultivated an apple in the state.  Washington State University created the "Cosmic Crisp" which is just now in markets.  From what I've read it takes years to cultivate a new apple so I'm sure they've been at it for a while.  They will own exclusive rights to sell the apple for 10 years.  I haven't seen it yet, but it's described as a cross between the Enterprise and the Honeycrisp.  They say that it has a long shelf life and does well stored in the fridge. It's best for eating they say with a good balance of sweet and tart and very crisp.  I'll try to buy some when it shows up locally.  It's already in markets in the Seattle and Yakima areas.

Cosmic Crisp Apples.jpg

 

I think grant writing is a big factor - gottaa pay someone to do it. well. 

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On evenings I bake, dinner is typically an apple.  Tonight I took one for science and the team.  Honeycrisp has never been my favorite variety, though it ranks up there.  Pink Lady I always thought was superior, not to mention a cheap date.  Last year I discovered Lady Alice who reigns as my current paramour.  Granny Smith remains my elder mistress, she never disappoints.

 

And so to my tasting with malus aforethought:  Pink Lady was not available; the showdown was between Honeycrisp and Lady Alice.  Both organic and fine specimens.  Bread, quartet of cheeses and a liter of methode rotuts for cleansing of the palate.  (Palate can get awfully dirty.)

 

To begin, Lady Alice was the prettier of the two.  The Honeycrisp perchance had too much green.  Both had fine sweetness and acidity.  Slightly different aromatics.  The Lady Alice won out on texture.  And the Honeycrisp oxidized faster than the Lady Alice.  (It takes some while to cleanse the palate properly.)  Indeed the Lady Alice suffered no oxidation during the course of the experiment.

 

Could I have told the difference in a triangle test, probably.  Could I have guessed the variety blindfolded double blind, probably not.  Still, tonight's nod went to Lady Alice.

 

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I can't keep up with the varieties.  I grew up in northern apple orchard country.   Northern Spy, Winesap, Jonathons, McIntosh, Pippin, Snow are cemented in my mind as what I judge all other apples by.   Used to piss me off at school lunch they would serve us the effing awful Red Delicious apples when right out the door of the school were local apples of heritage and great taste.    The only apple I look forward to now, where I am, is the Jazz.   I think I'll try the Cosmic Crisp out of curiosity, but Jazz variety reminds me of those northern apples quite a bit.


Edited by lemniscate (log)
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I screwed up a couple days ago.  I bought some Granny Smith apples because I had been craving apple pie.  I am picky about apple pie.  I don't like any crunch in the apples.  They need to keep their shape, but NO crunch.  So, I always pre-cook my apple pie filling (also, you can put more apples in the pie 'cause they cook down).  It's a tricky thing---can't over do it or by the time you bake the pie it's mush.  

 

I over did it.

 

:(

 

It wasn't mush by any means, but it wouldn't have worked in a pie.  So, I put it in the fridge and thought about it for a couple days.

 

I found puff pastry in the freezer so I thought apple turnovers!  Never made those before.

 

YUM.

 

Sometimes a screw up works out

 

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Still hungry for pie though .........

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@Shelby

 

completely agree on the ' crunch ' issues for apples

 

in apple desserts.

 

I don't skin mine , when i do apple desserts , mostly crisps , as they are a lot

 

easier than ' pastry lines ' desserts.

 

might fine looking turnovers.

 

like the glaze.

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One year DH and I were on a trip to the Seattle area and I was driving; made a wrong turn coming out of a rest area so we decided we'd try to find our way back and got kind of lost.  (I am notoriously bad at directions and tell everyone that I can get lost leaving an empty room.)

Anyway, our new route took us through orchard country and I've never seen so many apple trees...miles and miles of them.  Interesting, all kinds of fruit trees and lots of picking going on.

 

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On 10/28/2019 at 7:51 AM, Shelby said:

I screwed up a couple days ago.  I bought some Granny Smith apples because I had been craving apple pie.  I am picky about apple pie.  I don't like any crunch in the apples.  They need to keep their shape, but NO crunch.  So, I always pre-cook my apple pie filling (also, you can put more apples in the pie 'cause they cook down).  It's a tricky thing---can't over do it or by the time you bake the pie it's mush.  

 

I over did it.

 

:(

 

It wasn't mush by any means, but it wouldn't have worked in a pie.  So, I put it in the fridge and thought about it for a couple days.

 

I found puff pastry in the freezer so I thought apple turnovers!  Never made those before.

 

YUM.

 

Sometimes a screw up works out

 

thumbnail_IMG_6980.jpg.9aed0b84317b752e625baf90b2507714.jpg

thumbnail_IMG_6982.jpg.422e5abdc1305faffaad9ad77dbb3fdc.jpg

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Still hungry for pie though .........

I do the same thing. A lot.  Whether it's a recipe I found or a new dish I'm creating, I get things done and think, "well I didn't get that right." But often I re-think and re-work it the next day and it's much better.  And those look tasty.

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On 10/28/2019 at 8:53 AM, lindag said:

One year DH and I were on a trip to the Seattle area and I was driving; made a wrong turn coming out of a rest area so we decided we'd try to find our way back and got kind of lost.  (I am notoriously bad at directions and tell everyone that I can get lost leaving an empty room.)

Anyway, our new route took us through orchard country and I've never seen so many apple trees...miles and miles of them.  Interesting, all kinds of fruit trees and lots of picking going on.

 

Years ago I sometimes went to Wenatchee, WA on business.  It's the heart of WA apple country.  There was this little cafe in the airport that made the best fresh apple milkshakes.  Sounds weird and I never figured out how they got apple flavor so pure and fresh in a milkshake.

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On 10/28/2019 at 11:53 AM, lindag said:

One year DH and I were on a trip to the Seattle area and I was driving; made a wrong turn coming out of a rest area so we decided we'd try to find our way back and got kind of lost.  (I am notoriously bad at directions and tell everyone that I can get lost leaving an empty room.)

Anyway, our new route took us through orchard country and I've never seen so many apple trees...miles and miles of them.  Interesting, all kinds of fruit trees and lots of picking going on.

 

Debbie Macomber (who lives near Seattle) wrote a series of romance novels based in eastern Washington called the Apple Valley series.

 

On the other hand … my mom always had us peel the apples for pies, cut into quarters, cut the cores out then half were cut lengthwise and half crosswise.  S then cooked them down slightly in butter then added her spices and then into her lard crust.  She told us she cut the apples that way so she could get more into the pie.  As a kid they were Northern Spys a gentleman always brought down from upstate.  We always bought two bushels and they went into the cellar for the winter.

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Nothing is better than frying in lard.

Nothing.  Do not quote me on this.

 

Linda Ellerbee

Take Big Bites

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1 hour ago, suzilightning said:

Debbie Macomber (who lives near Seattle) wrote a series of romance novels based in eastern Washington called the Apple Valley series.

 

On the other hand … my mom always had us peel the apples for pies, cut into quarters, cut the cores out then half were cut lengthwise and half crosswise.  S then cooked them down slightly in butter then added her spices and then into her lard crust.  She told us she cut the apples that way so she could get more into the pie.  As a kid they were Northern Spys a gentleman always brought down from upstate.  We always bought two bushels and they went into the cellar for the winter.

Sad about Northern Spys.  Haven't seen them in a grocery store in our area anyway forever.  OTOH, we have our very own Northern Spy tree in our back yard.  Alas, it is not faring well.  Along with the thriving Mac.  And we have no idea how old the trees are.  Ditto for all the trees on the farm (which originally was two 50-acre farms).  

 

Another apple I miss is the Russet.  eGers have posted that they can get them somewhere, but that where is not my where.  

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Darienne

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22 minutes ago, Darienne said:

 

Another apple I miss is the Russet.  eGers have posted that they can get them somewhere, but that where is not my where.  

I see them (very) occasionally at Superstore. It's possible you may be able to come to an understanding with the produce manager at your nearest Loblaw brand, and get a call as/if/when they're available.

 


Edited by chromedome (log)
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“What is called sound economics is very often what mirrors the needs of the respectably affluent.” - John Kenneth Galbraith

 

"Not knowing the scope of your own ignorance is part of the human condition...The first rule of the Dunning-Kruger club is you don’t know you’re a member of the Dunning-Kruger club.” - psychologist David Dunning

 

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I grew up with many apple trees grafted so the whole name thing not an issue. We just preferred certain ones. My favorite apple grower is in Temecula, Ca   They have since expanded the types. - they are outstanding    post-52659-0-39003000-1304278472.jpg

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I commend to any of you, and especially those who make apple butter, the Arkansas Black apple. It's a very late-ripening apple with firm, tart flesh and an almost black (thus the name) skin, and it makes absolutely the best apple butter I have ever made. Didn't get any this year, but I'm low on apple butter, so will have to remedy that next year.

 

I had several Jazz apples on the counter that needed using, and I'd pulled a recipe for Fresh Apple Cake from the 12 Tomatoes site, so those two combined today. It's a very heavy, pound-cakeish batter (has cream cheese in it, no other liquid other than eggs), and produces a moist, dense and quite tasty cake, even for having been adapted to gluten-free. It would benefit from some cinnamon and other apple-friendly spices, and I might think about swapping the white sugar for brown sugar next time, but I'll call it a success. The recipe called for dusting it with powdered sugar (I didn't), but I think it'd benefit from some good caramel sauce.

 

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Don't ask. Eat it.

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