• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

weedy

Liquid Smoke with sous vide hamburgers

12 posts in this topic

I'm thinking of experimenting with some Liquid Smoke with my sous vide hamburgers, and I'm wondering if anyone has any opinions as to when makes the most sense...

 

 

1) brush before bagging

2) brush when coming out of the bag after cooking, but before searing

3) brush after searing, when otherwise all 'done'

 

 

any thoughts anyone?

 

my inclination leans toward (2), although I'll probably try all three


Edited by weedy (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

id also go w 2

 

Ive used this stuff quite a bit for meat loaf etc

 

its very very potent.   if a burger gets more than 1/4 drop, well

 

you will be tasting 'smoke' not burger.

 

like to hear how it turns out.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

skip the liquid and get smoked salt or smoked pepper. Add to the ground beef before making your patties. You can cook right away, but if you want a juicier burger with less shrinkage, freeze then cook from frozen.


Edited by FeChef (log)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't do SV, but I have used liquid smoke a lot.  I'd go along with FeChef and try using smoked S&P, smoked paprika (I like some of the Spanish brands), and even a smattering of ground, dried chipotle, depending on the heat and flavor you want. You could even add some of the adobo sauce in which canned chipotles are packed.


 ... Shel

"... ya can't please everyone, so ya got to please yourself "

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I wanted chipotle burgers, or chipotle ketchup on them, etc., I would have just made that from the beginning.

 

I'm not looking to substantially change the flavour profile here.

just to add some sense of smoke that grilling imparts but sous vide doesn't.

 

I've done them seared with a torch or on a cast iron comal... but my current favourite way is actually quick frying in an inch or so of hot oil.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I find liquid smoke to be a bit chemical tasting, but that's just me.

 

I think the smoked salt idea is a good one, since you're probably salting the meat already.

 

I have this brand, and it's pretty darn good...

 

Falk Sea Salt


Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

mweinstein@eGstaff.org

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

L.S.  in real moderation is fine  when cooked

 

a bit like Red Boat in that sense only

 

not cooked  ........................

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with Rotuts that moderation is important.  I haven't seen Liquid Smoke (brand) here, but I have a local equivalent that's really powerful (it actually works pretty well - in tiny amounts - sprayed onto a particular cocktail we do sometimes which should have real smoke).

 

My main question about when to apply it for a SV application is whether it would 'wash off' in the bag if applied before cooking.  But maybe that would be a good thing in terms of minimising the amount lingering in the food.

 

Another question is how Liquid Smoke is packaged.  Is it a normal bottle or does it have a spray attachment?  If the latter, a small squirt just before serving would be my suggestion.


Leslie Craven, aka "lesliec"
Host, eG Forumslcraven@egstaff.org

After a good dinner one can forgive anybody, even one's own relatives ~ Oscar Wilde

My eG Foodblog

eGullet Ethics Code signatory

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Let me make a suggestion - something I have been doing for many years, not just with ground meats, with stews, vegetables grilled on an electric grill and with jams, preserves, etc.

I have written about this in other threads when I suggested adding the brewed tea to preserves (I do it routinely with fig, quince and peach) to serve with cheeses, particularly the stronger flavored cheeses.

 

Brew some extra strong Lapsang Souchong tea - use 2 teaspoons of tea leaves to one cup of boiling water and steep for a minimum of 8 minutes.

Drain and cool - this can be refrigerated for at least a week.

 

For each pound of ground meat, sprinkle 1/4 cup of the cold tea over the meat, along with the seasonings and mix well and form into patties.

 

The smokiness is not at all "chemical" and is very tasty. 

 

I also use the dry tea leaves for stove-top smoking of duck, chicken, pork chops, etc., as it is much tastier (to me) than using the various wood chips available for use with the smokers.

1 person likes this

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I know you asked about liquid smoke, but to me nothing tastes like the real thing.  This is why I love to cold smoke the raw hamburgers for a couple of hours before sous vide.

I also like doing this with steaks, wings, pork etc.

 

I use a small under counter refrigerator that I found used for $20.  You want to use a smoke chamber that is cold since you will be smoking raw meat.  I plug it in and get it cold first, then put the raw patties in on a wire rack.  For the smoke I have a homemade cold smoke setup that uses pellets or small wood chunks (the flavor is up to you...apple, peach, mesquite, hickory etc.)  

 

It uses a venturi / injector design to pull the smoke from the can of smoldering pellets/wood and delivers it to the refrigerator through a 1" pipe.  I drilled a hole in the bottom corner of the refrigerator.  Make sure you are VERY careful to miss any lines that are embedded in the walls of the refrigerator.

 

It is very efficient, smoking for hours on a couple cups of pellets.  2 hours seems to be plenty on burgers since they have a lot of surface area to absorb the smoke.  I will do steaks a bit longer (depending on the thickness).  The inside of the refrigerator gets a horrible stained brown color - the color of smoke!  I just wipe it out when done and don't try to clean the smoke stain off it.

 

After smoking I vac seal them for sous viding.  The flavor is very noticeable and very authentic.  Yes it takes a bit of time, but if you are already going to the work of grinding your owne burger, sous viding and then searing, you already know the benefits and readily accept the work!

 

Refrigerator Style: http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-x7kwe8YWaRU/T1BioqADyfI/AAAAAAAAA8c/thOWiW9Q6as/s1600/RCS-Brand-Refrigerator.jpg

 

Cold smoker setup: http://www.instructables.com/id/Cold-Smoker-from-Cocktail-Shaker/

 

Good Luck!


3- PolyScience/VWR 1122s Circulators,  Solaire Infrared grill (unparalleled sear)  Thermapen (green of course - for accuracy!)  Musso 5030 Ice cream machine, Ankarsrum Mixer, Memphis Pro Pellet Grill, Home grown refrigerated cold smoker (ala Smoke Daddy)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By bhsimon
      I want to make mint spheres for use in a hot sauce. (Think lamb with mint caviar.)   Can this be done? Is it possible to make heat-stable spheres?   What is the most effective way to extract mint flavour from the raw leaves? I don't want the resulting spheres to contain alcohol as it will be served to children. My cursory investigations indicate that glycerol may be an alternative—has anyone done this?
    • By boudin noir
      I recently did some halibut steaks sous vide. They were about 1 1/2  inches thick. I did them for 30 minutes at 122 degrees. When i took them out to brown them, they were very fragile. As I browned them they fell apart. They were delicious, perfectly cooked from an eating point of view, but ugly. Too hot, too long or both?
    • By bhsimon
      Anyone tried this?
       
      I'm trying to think of something novel to do for my friends at an upcoming birthday weekend. We are renting a house in the Hunter Valley (Australian wine region) and food is a major component of our weekend. Last time I did fizzy fruit—the grapes and oranges were awesome and everyone enjoyed the unique experience. I want to do something quirky like that again.
       
      The whipping siphon is easy to transport so I'm interested in using it. The siphoned soufflé in Modernist Cuisine, volume 4 page 297, has a chocolate variation that does not require propylene glycol alginate or maltodextrin (I don't have those things in my pantry, yet). That looks like it might be a good one to try. Anyone done that and have some advice for me before I dive in?
    • By bhsimon
      Besides the health concerns, deep frying steak is the best way to get an even colour and crust on steak. In my most recent experiment, I tried the technique of deep frying prior to, and after, cooking the steak sous vide. In the past, I had only fried the meat after it had been cooked.
       
      The meat was veal chops. As can often be the case, the meat was mishandled somewhere along the way. The obvious signs of this were indentations in the surface. This kind of thing makes it tricky to pan fry and get even colour.
       


       
      This soft meat is also tricky to vacuum seal as it can often be further compressed and misshapen in the process.
       
      I was delighted to observe that a short 45 seconds in hot oil fixed both of these issues! I didn't expect that. Nice. The meat plumped up and that indentation was gone. It also held its shape nicely when vacuum packed.
       

       
      Time and temperature matters. The difference can be just a few seconds or degrees. In the next picture, the time was the same but the oil was 20°C hotter for the steak on the left and the crust is noticeably darker. My next experiment will try 30 seconds at 200°C before and after.
       


      The goal is to keep the crust as thin as possible.
       

       
      I hadn't anticipated the secondary benefits of deep frying prior to sous vide. The plumping of the meat and slight firmness made them easy to package and present. I am curious whether anyone has observed this. I am also curious if it would it work in hot water, rather than oil.



    • By Porthos
      I have purchased an Anova circulator. My interest in sous vide is based upon needing to prepare chicken and pork dishes that remain more moist than other cooking methods I have used. This is based upon needing more moistness for my wife. After her bariactric surgery she became sensitive to meat that is not still very moist.
       
      I would like recommendations for some threads to read through to help get me started.
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.