Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Shelby

The Bread Topic (2014 –2015)

Recommended Posts

image.jpg

image.jpg

Needed to kill two birds with one stone! Wanted a slice or two of bread to go into a romesco sauce and needed to check out a borrowed deep pie plate so I could return it. Pane di Genzano. (Toasted it also made a fine breakfast.)

  • Like 4

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We have a new specialty store in the area - Scoops Natural Foods where I can buy grain and have it milled on site.   

Whole%20Wheat%20September%207th%2C%20201

 

 

Whole%20Wheat%20September%207th%2C%20201

So I decided to try making Whole Wheat bread.

 

Rather than find a recipe I just adjusted my normal bread - 500g whole wheat (Heritage Organic stoneground Red Fife, 500g white, 80g of muilt grain (11 grains), 700 g water, 4 g yeast and 26g salt.  

 

I added the multi grain mix to the water , in the bucket , and let it sit for 20 minutes before mixing in the flours. Left to rest (autolyze) for 30 minutes before mixing in the yeast and  salt. Left to rest again for 20 minutes before finishing with the pinch and folds.

 

I did three more folds over the next 60 minutes before placing the dough in the fridge for an overnight rise.

 

Took the dough out of the fridge at 5:30 AM.

 

I'm very pleased with the way the whole wheat bread turned out. Not bad for a first try.

 

The rise was good, even in the fridge overnight the dough more than tripled. It was easy to work with - and it was proofed in less than an hour. Baked in preheated dutch ovens.

 

 

Whole%20Wheat%20Tomato%20Sandwich%20Sept

Hungry husband so I made him a tomato sandwich.
  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ann_T,

Your whole wheat looks and sounds great. Unfortunately my family is against anything with whole wheat! This always amuses me. For some years they would eat nothing but whole wheat and that from the supermarket. I could never enjoy a sandwich at their house because it was like filling between two egg cartons! Oh well.


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anna, I must confess, I'm not a fan of whole wheat either.   But this bread turned out well and Moe really liked it.  (Unfortunately).  So, I'll continue to play around experimenting with WW.    I think the next batch of WW will be made with organic hard white winter wheat, rather than the Red Fife.

 

Small%20Boules%20September%2011th%2C%202

 

Meanwhile, I made another batch of my basic daily bread on Wednesday.

 

Shaped as small boules instead of baguettes. The perfect size for two to share.

 

Small%20Boules%20September%2011th%2C%202

 

Really  happy with the crumb on this bread made from 'same day' dough.

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ann,

Your breads are always amazing! I love the idea of the small boules.


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

image.jpg

Two loaves of rustic potato bread from Baking with Julia.

  • Like 2

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How do you like this bread, Anna?

It is a flavourful loaf with a somewhat more sturdy crumb than found in white sandwich bread. Toasts beautifully. It will go into my regular rotation but of course depends on having about three large russet potatoes on hand for two loaves. I don't keep potatoes on hand but buy them as needed so this will likely limit the number of times I make this bread. I would not attempt it without a stand mixer and it definitely stretched the limits of my compact Bosch. I might attempt a half recipe next time.

image.jpg

Here's the crumb.

Edited to add photograph.


Edited by Anna N (log)
  • Like 6

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anna, I like the texture/crumb of your potato bread.  Looks like it would be perfect for sandwiches.

 

I'm so boring, I tend to make the same style of bread, with slight variations.  I need to do what you do and add a couple of new breads to the rotation. 

 

Baked sourdough last night.

 

Sourdough%20September%2014th%2C%202014%2

 

I made a biga Saturday morning before leaving for work and hand kneaded the dough Saturday night. It went into the fridge until Sunday afternoon. Moe took the bucket out of the fridge around 3:00 PM so that I would be able to bake Sunday night.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is a flavourful loaf with a somewhat more sturdy crumb than found in white sandwich bread. Toasts beautifully. It will go into my regular rotation but of course depends on having about three large russet potatoes on hand for two loaves. I don't keep potatoes on hand but buy them as needed so this will likely limit the number of times I make this bread. I would not attempt it without a stand mixer and it definitely stretched the limits of my compact Bosch. I might attempt a half recipe next time.

attachicon.gifimage.jpg

Here's the crumb.

Edited to add photograph.

Thanks, Anna. Being from PA Dutch lines, I love potato breads. This looks like a good bread for "messy" sandwiches and toast. I have the book, and will try it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Can I add crackers here?

 

I just tried the life changing crackers, while I didn't really care for this blog life changing bread regardless the 1200 answers to a post!, I really really liked these crackers. Also gluten free. I think that with some cheese, cold cuts or smoked fish are just awesome. 

 

life changing crackers.jpeg

 

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have been making the Cook's Illustrated Mostly-No-Knead Bread for some time--the first rise is 18 hours or more, then after a quick folding and slight kneading, the second rise is in a bowl lined with parchment, so that the loaf can easily be transferred to the 500F. preheated pot with cover.  Oven temp is lowered to 425F., bread is baked for 30 minutes, then cover is removed, and baking continues for 15-20 min. until the internal temp of the loaf is around 200F.  I remove the loaf from the pot and cool it on a rack.  The taste is acceptable, and the look of the outside is beautiful.  But when I cut the bread, it does not have that crackle that it looks as if it will have.  It's actually difficult to cut, as the exterior of the loaf is quite flexible.  I think I recall that this same recipe produced a loaf with a crunchy exterior some time ago, and I am not aware of any changes I have made.  The second baking period lasted only about 15 minutes yesterday, the loaf had reached 200F., and I didn't want to overbake.  Is it possible I am just not leaving it in the oven long enough and the bread is therefore softening as it sits?

 

Any suggestions would be appreciated.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Shelby, just as a matter of interest, can you let me know the diameter and height of your rings? I want to get my pan manufacturer to knock out some for me as they are not readily available here. John.


Cape Town - At the foot of a flat topped mountain with a tablecloth covering it.

Some time ago we had Johnny Cash, Bob Hope and Steve Jobs. Now we have no Cash, no Hope and no Jobs. Please don't let Kevin Bacon die.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The rings are 11 3/4 inches around and 1" tall, John.

 

I purchased them here just in case you want to look:

 

http://www.kingarthurflour.com/shop/items/english-muffin-rings-set-of-12

Thanks for that. Had to do some maths to get that in metric - 95mmø x 25mm. Most appreciated.

Cape Town - At the foot of a flat topped mountain with a tablecloth covering it.

Some time ago we had Johnny Cash, Bob Hope and Steve Jobs. Now we have no Cash, no Hope and no Jobs. Please don't let Kevin Bacon die.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oh sorry John!!!! I forgot to convert it :blush:

Ha, did not expect you to! It now gives me a better idea as to size - they are quite big. English muffins available here are a bit smaller and a bit thinner, but I have not bought them for years, so I will have to go and visit one of the upperclass supermarkets with my little tape measure to see what is available these days. Thanks for posting the pic - it now gives me the incentive to make them myself. John.

  • Like 1

Cape Town - At the foot of a flat topped mountain with a tablecloth covering it.

Some time ago we had Johnny Cash, Bob Hope and Steve Jobs. Now we have no Cash, no Hope and no Jobs. Please don't let Kevin Bacon die.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

image.jpg

My current standard sandwich bread. It is from Cook's illustrated and seems to be pretty foolproof. I always get good loft with it.

  • Like 6

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My current standard sandwich bread. It is from Cook's illustrated and seems to be pretty foolproof. I always get good loft with it.

Anna,

If the information is handy, could you let me know the issue of CI in which this appeared?  I've been using a recipe from the Fannie Farmer cookbook, but the results are erratic and the flavor is rather plain.  Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anna,

If the information is handy, could you let me know the issue of CI in which this appeared?  I've been using a recipe from the Fannie Farmer cookbook, but the results are erratic and the flavor is rather plain.  Thanks.

Jim,

I have sent you a P.M.


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Your rolls are just GORGEOUS!!!   I am SO jealous!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

  • Similar Content

    • By JoNorvelleWalker
      Ankarsrum, the Swedish mixer of many names: Electrolux Assistent, DLX, Verona, Magic Mill...
       

       
       
      I understand a few eGullet folks have these, or have had.  Mine came this afternoon.  From what I've read, mixing procedure with the Ankarsrum is different from mixing with planetary stand mixers.  At the moment I need advice specifically with whether I should use the dough hook (with or without the scraper arm) or the roller attachment for my bread.
       
      The Ankarsrum manual says to use the dough hook for dough with between 1 and 1.5 liters of liquid ingredients.  OK.  My usual dough recipe uses 410 g of water.  Rose Levy Beranbaum in The Bread Bible says to use the dough hook when mixing less than 4 pounds of dough.  Which if my math is correct is about 750 g of water (math is not my thing).  Beranbaum adds "For larger amounts, use the roller and scraper."
       
      Yet most bread recipes in the Ankarsrum recipe booklet that call for the dough hook use about a liter of liquid.  The recipes that call for the roller use less liquid, 400-600 ml.  Beranbaum is usually right but I'm wondering if she's wrong?
       
      Thoughts or suggestions?
       
       
      P.S.  Sparkling Gold was not my first color choice.  Sparkling Gold was perhaps not my thirteenth color choice.  But Sparkling Gold was 10 percent off.  Besides, the gold color matches the gold lettering on the bowl and dials.  Now I feel better.
       
       
    • By jedovaty
      (Note: This topic was split from the Monkey Bread topic, to keep both discussions focused and relevant to the question at hand.)
      I made inverse puff pastry last week for "chasson aux pommes" (apple turnovers).  Never made puff pastry before.  Beginner's luck, turned out beyond expectations, super layers, butter, crisp exterior, tender honeycomb inerior (even without yeast!!), lightly sweet, slightly tart, it took every bit of will power not to eat them before taking them to work. 
      Based on all the suggestions, I saved the scraps, and additionally separated them by size and shape.  Seems like I can make something called "monkey bread", but I have no clue what that actually is.  I've researched it, and it seems I should just bunch it up with sugar and bake... but these aren't yeasted, sooooo wouldn't bunching these up screw up the layers and make more of a pie dough squishy thing?
      Reading the forums, with puff pastry I can make little cookies or crackers or other things.  But I'm not quite sure how to do this?  They are kind of small to twist into sticks or roll into arlettes?  Help please and thank you??? 🤝
      For now, I've put scraps in the freezer.

    • By Pastrypastmidnight
      So I tried my hand at croissants for the first time in about 5 years. I used the recipe from the Bouchon Bakery cookbook. Despite the fact that I really struggled rolling them out (the dough was very stiff and resisted rolling), tore the dough layer in small patches quite a bit on the last turn, and probably took too long letting the butter get too warm, I got nice layers on the outside and on the interior and they did shatter nicely on the outside. I did not get that beautiful open honeycomb interior, however. 
       
      I’d love any tips or feedback or advice anyone could offer to do better next time—thanks!
       

    • By curls
      So, what is everyone doing for the pastry & baking side of Easter?
       
      I'm working on the following chocolates: fruit & nut eggs, hollow bunnies, Jelly Belly filled bunnies, coconut bunnies, dragons (filled with rice krispies & chocolate), peanut butter hedgehogs, and malted milk hens. Hoping to finish my dark chocolate production today and get started on all my milk chocolate items.
       
      My father-in-law will be baking the traditional family Easter bread a day or two before Easter. Its an enriched bread and he makes two versions -- one with raisins and one without (I prefer the one with raisins).
       

       
      And I was lucky enough to spot this couple in the sale moulds stock at last year's eGullet chocolate & confections workshop in Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario. These love bunnies help so very much with Easter chocolate production!  ;-)

    • By Rene_lorraine
      I'm a pastry cook working in NYC. We have a seasonal bread that we do with chickpeas, garlic (fresh and confit) and pecorino. We drain and rinse the chickpeas and it was working for a while but it hasn't been consistent. Bread turns out flat. What is it in chickpeas that kills the yeast and how can we counteract the effect? I'm taking a long shot by posting but wanted to further educate myself and fellow team members. Thanks so much. 
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...