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FrogPrincesse

Homemade Marshmallows: Recipes & Tips (Part 3)

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Having discovered that Greweling's recipe for pipeable marshmallows is meant for marshmallows piped onto parchment while the mixture is still hot, I am still working on pipeable marshmallows as a filling in a bonbon (the complication arises mostly from the fact that the temperature cannot be too high because the marshmallow will melt the chocolate shell). I'm making some progress, with a successful attempt yesterday. But I'm puzzled by the discrepancies I find in the temp to which the syrup is to be cooked. Greweling says 252F (250 in his at-home book), and he (and Wybauw) are the only sources I can find who take the syrup that high. Martha Stewart, Alton Brown, the Serious Eats site, Nightscotsman (who contributed the well-known recipe for strawberry marshmallows to eGullet), etc., call for somewhere in the 234-240 range. David Lebovitz is the only one I found who gets close to Greweling, calling for 245. If the soft-ball stage is the goal, then 252 seems quite high. In Part I of this marshmallow thread, someone is told pointedly that the 250 range is too high. For those who have made Greweling's marshmallows, did you have issues with his comparatively high temperature? For my goal, a lower temperature keeps the marshmallow softer (good for piping purposes) and also helps with the issue of getting the temp down to the 80-85 range quickly enough so that the gelatin does not have so much time to thicken and make piping impossible.

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Posted (edited)

Time -Life recipie is 127C (260F). But again piped warm into starch.

 

Marshmallow fluff which can be piped at room temp goes to 120C - 248F.


Edited by Kerry Beal (log)

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Good point, Kerry. The lower temp sounds as if it is what I am looking for (as it is really marshmallow fluff that I am trying to make, but without dried egg whites--I bought some highly recommended ones from Amazon, and they smell and taste "off" to an unacceptable degree).

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58 minutes ago, Jim D. said:

Good point, Kerry. The lower temp sounds as if it is what I am looking for (as it is really marshmallow fluff that I am trying to make, but without dried egg whites--I bought some highly recommended ones from Amazon, and they smell and taste "off" to an unacceptable degree).

Would you consider real egg white? The temperature of the sugar syrup would be high enough to eliminate any salmonella.

 

 

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I'll give using real egg white some consideration. I'm reluctant, but it would certainly make marshmallow fluff easier...and tastier.

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Posted (edited)
23 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

Would you consider real egg white? The temperature of the sugar syrup would be high enough to eliminate any salmonella.

 

Couldn't you bypass the egg white step (fresh or powdered) and just stick with gelatin, or was there a reason to use egg whites?


Edited by pastryani (log)

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12 minutes ago, pastryani said:

Couldn't you bypass the egg white step (fresh or powdered) and just stick with gelatin, or was there a reason to use egg whites?

 

 

When you use egg whites, you can beat them and the hot syrup together, then let them cool down to somewhere around 90F. At that point the gelatin can be mixed in, will still dissolve at that temp, and you have only a little more cooling to do before a safe temperature for piping is reached. There is no worrying about whether the gelatin is going to jell when the temp is still too high for the chocolate. When you use the just gelatin and syrup method, you can't wait for the syrup to cool down because it thickens too much to beat with the gelatin--or at least this has been my experience.

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I have not done a side by side test but I remember discussion about the texture of the marshallow being better when egg whites are used. Might do a test some day -- maybe the next chocolate & confections workshop!

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I haven't made marshmallow fluff, but I've made marshmallows both with and without egg whites. I find that the ones with egg whites (I used whites I separated myself) give the marshmallows a flavor I really don't care for, whereas the ones with gelatin alone don't. I have nothing against eggs in general, and I don't mind meringue. For me, it's all about taste.

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