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FrogPrincesse

Mixing with Armagnac

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What are your favorite cocktails with armagnac? I have bought a bottle of Delord Napoleon especially for mixing purposes and am looking for ideas. An obvious starting point is cocktails traditionally made with cognac that could use a little bit of extra character.

 

haresfur suggested a Sazerac with armagnac and bourbon which sounds awfully nice.

 

So far I've made the Déjà Vu (Riccardo Semeria) with armagnac, French vermouth, benedictine, absinthe.

 

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Earlier this week I made a long drink with ginger beer, a little concerned that the armagnac would be lost despite what the cocktail notes claimed. Behind the Facade (Nicole Lebedevitch) with armagnac, Bonal, apricot liqueur (R&W), lemon juice, Bundaberg ginger beer, and orange bitters (Regan + Fee). Well, the drink was fine but the armagnac got lost as the ginger dominated the drink. The armagnac contributed some bass notes that were only apparent near the end. I think it helped as a foundation for the cocktail, but it was hard to actually taste it. I think we can do better.

 

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I'd certainly want to try a sidecar or variant to see if the extra depth makes a difference. Maybe pull back a bit on the citrus?

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A sidecar sounds nice, although it's a drink that is hard to get just right.

 

I had to try a Sazerac last night as haresfur had suggested. I went with armagnac and Bulleit rye 1:1. I used gomme
(Small Hands) and St. George absinthe. I was out of lemons so I used a blood orange peel (not my first choice).

 

It was very nice albeit slightly busy, the armagnac and rye fighting for the spotlight, and the gomme tying everything together.

 

14735645584_73da02946f_z.jpg

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haresfur suggested a Sazerac with armagnac and bourbon which sounds awfully nice.

 

Great idea.

 

Similarly, I like to mix Armagnac in equal parts with Irish whiskey (usually Redbreast), as a kind of inversion of the rough 'n spicy whiskey / smooth and stately brandy combo that powers a lot of drinks that call for rye and Cognac (Vieux Carre, etc). I made an Old Fashioned the other day for a guest using this mixture. I tend to find that Armagnac and rye butt heads, as you noted when you made your Sazerac. 


Edited by Rafa (log)
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”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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Corpse Reviver No. 1 variation  (Jackson Cannon) with armagnac (Delord Napoleon), calvados (Daron XO), sweet vermouth (I used Margerum amaro which is very close to a sweet vermouth). It was nice to have the apple notes intermingle with the armagnac.With the Margerum the finish is slightly bitter which I enjoyed too.

 

14795407511_ab13e030ee_z.jpg
 

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This one by Rafa called for cognac but being of PF 1840 at the moment, I roughed it and used Armagnac instead. Happy to find new uses for the Nonino. And I had almost forgotten that I had a bottle of walnut liqueur. Very nice fall flavors.

 

The Boardroom (Rafa García Febles) with Delord armagnac, amaro Nonino, Charbay walnut liqueur, Abbott's bitters.

 

15268414053_def102aea3_z.jpg

 

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Due to most readily available VSOP cognacs being about £5 more expensive than similar aged Armagnac, we mix with the latter at the bar. It has found its way into our Sazerac premix and the other day i made some blazers with it, fortified with Smith and Cross.


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This one by Rafa called for cognac but being of PF 1840 at the moment, I roughed it and used Armagnac instead. Happy to find new uses for the Nonino. And I had almost forgotten that I had a bottle of walnut liqueur. Very nice fall flavors.

 

The Boardroom (Rafa García Febles) with Delord armagnac, amaro Nonino, Charbay walnut liqueur, Abbott's bitters.

 

 

 

 

Sounds interesting. Is there a something I can sub for the Abbot Bitters? I am not familiar with them but from what I can find it sounds like they are in the angostura family. Will have to sub in Nux Alpina as well.


If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...

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Nux Alpina (and Pierre Ferrand 1840) are what I spec'd it with, so that should be fine. Ango will do the trick—I like the Abbott's because they do their work more subtly than the Ango, contributing less of their own flavor, but the clove and cinnamom of Angostura would be welcome here.

Note that as spec'd it's on the sweet side; some will prefer a higher portion of brandy.


DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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Nux Alpina (and Pierre Ferrand 1840) are what I spec'd it with, so that should be fine. Ango will do the trick—I like the Abbott's because they do their work more subtly than the Ango, contributing less of their own flavor, but the clove and cinnamom of Angostura would be welcome here.

Note that as spec'd it's on the sweet side; some will prefer a higher portion of brandy.

 

Thanks. The PF 1840 and Amaro Nonino isn't a problem, have plenty of those. Will keep an eye out for the Abbott's.


If you pick up a starving dog and make him prosperous, he will not bite you. This is the principal difference between a dog and a man. ~Mark Twain

Some people are like a Slinky. They are not really good for anything, but you still can't help but smile when you shove them down the stairs...

~tanstaafl2

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Sounds interesting. Is there a something I can sub for the Abbot Bitters? I am not familiar with them but from what I can find it sounds like they are in the angostura family.

 

 

Fee's Whiskey Barrel Old Fashion will do it.


The Dead Parrot; Built from the ground up by bartenders, for everyone:

Monkey Shoulder Ultimate Bartender Champions, 2015

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(From the Sazerac thread)

 

A delightful Spring Sazerac, a creation by Toby Maloney with cognac (Pierre Ferrand 1840), curaçao (Pierre Ferrand dry curaçao), demerara simple syrup, orange bitters (Fee Brothers & Regan's), aromatic bitters (Angostura), absinthe (St. George), lemon peel.

 

Now I want to try an armagnac version.

 

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And here is the Armagnac version, which is equally as delightful.

 

 

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For this one I used Bas-Armagnac Delord Napoleon, Pierre Ferrand dry curaçao, demerara simple syrup, Angostura/Fee/Regan's orange bitters, Angostura bitters, St. George absinthe.

 

The Delord Napoleon is so-so on its own (especially compared to the 25 year...), but works great in cocktails.


Edited by FrogPrincesse (log)
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Gorgeous garnish.


DrunkLab.tumblr.com

”In Demerara some of the rum producers have a unique custom of placing chunks of raw meat in the casks to assist in aging, to absorb certain impurities, and to add a certain distinctive character.” -Peter Valaer, "Foreign and Domestic Rum," 1937

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Thanks Rafa.

 

Armagnac and Suze with some St. Germain to brighten things up. Yes. This was very small but I will make another one once I replenish my supply of Armagnac.

 

Prieuré de Sion (Isak Cornelis von Werther via Gaz Regan) with Delord armagnac Napoleon, St. Germain, Suze, Peychaud's bitters.

 

20531000113_a6a6617b10_z.jpg

 

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