Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Confections! What did we make? (2014 – 2016)


minas6907
 Share

Recommended Posts

Yes, I used water--about half way up. I didn't think to use a rack:) The color is a little darker that the real stuff. I added about 200 g of cocoa butter besides the silk. I think it was too much. I think using clarified butter instead would have been better. Mine is snappier than Dulcey. The butter would make it a bit softer. The flavor is similar, but not as salty. I plan to use it in ganache, so it probably will be ok.

  • Like 1

Ruth Kendrick

Chocolot
Artisan Chocolates and Toffees
www.chocolot.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If it is Kerry's fork you are interested in why don't you PM her. She has them custom-made.

So sorry. Looks like I misunderstood your question.

I'll second that. I use mine almost exclusively.

  • Like 1

Little surprises 'round every corner, but nothing dangerous

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'll second that. I use mine almost exclusively.

 

Just today actually I think I solved my problem. The forks I us are from ateco, they are the full stainless ones (I think they have others with wooded handles). Anywho, Kerry sent me pictures of what hers looked like, and I noticed they were bent at the tines. I've been trying to come up with a way to bend mine at the base of the handle (I didn't have a vice or anything, and I'm not very mechanical) but today I just bent the tines how I wanted them, and they seem to hold up fine. I was afraid the tines would be too delicate to bend, but they are fine. This is just a simple solution for what I needed, I have no doubt that Kerrys forks are much more durable, but what I do with dipping is on the limited side, and was trying to figure a way to make a simple modification to these forks that are cheap enough that I wouldnt feel bad about destroying :-)

2015-05-26 16.00.13.jpg

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Beginning a post binge. These aren't exactly "lately"; my first public sale last November:

 

IMG_20141205_221823.jpg

Before going to the venue, clockwise from top: Irish Cream fudge, Cappuccino Truffles, Raspberry rustic truffles, white chocolate amaretto chocolate shortbread sandwiches.

IMG_20141206_093044.jpg

Candy on the sale table

IMG_20141206_093039.jpg

 

Wide shot. My wife makes the beautiful cookies.

  • Like 5

Little surprises 'round every corner, but nothing dangerous

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My favorite recent project: a precise chocolate warmer on a budget. Still in testing; this is the first attempt:

 

IMG_20150315_220543.jpg

 

Total parts cost $50.00. Note the genuine thrift shop Revere warming tray (as used by Kerry Beal!) I can't believe I found one. Water for this test as I wasn't ready to risk chocolate.

 

IMG_20150404_114845.jpg

 

Two short tests later shows it rigged for dipping. It worked, and the extra hot pad space kept my spat ready to go. Though it kept the chocolate within 1 degree C of center point, the difference between the real center and set point grew as the level of chocolate fell - and the chocolate was warmer than the probe. I nearly lost the last bit.

 

IMG_20150404_200817.jpg

 

This year's Easter production came entirely from the warmer.

  • Like 3

Little surprises 'round every corner, but nothing dangerous

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Latest test model. I figured that the open sides really chilled the probe and 1/3 pan more than I thought likely, so added insulation - blue foam wrapped in foil. Heat deformed the foam somewhat, but the results were good - center temp between 1 and 4 degrees C over setpoint, depending on time in the heat/cool cycle. When set to hold, center was steady at 2 degrees over setpoint with less than 1 degree C variance.

 

IMG_20150525_134801.jpg

 

Made bourbon cordial cherries with it, still setting up. Note: moulding fondant around a small, pitted, wet cherry does not result in a better or easier piece than dipping in melted fondant. They're both pretty tedious and subject to fault, at least when I do it, but I really like the flavor better than the firm candied cherries.

 

IMG_20150525_145504.jpg

  • Like 3

Little surprises 'round every corner, but nothing dangerous

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Psantucc - good to see you here! We missed you last weekend!

Missed you too, and the conference - it was thinking of you that finally made me get off my bum and at least post. My twin sons turn 18 in a month, and I confess I wasn't prepared for the degree to which the demands on my time and funds would increase. Whenever I squeezed in a  confectionery session for most of this year I ended up without time to organize my thoughts before haring off to the next thing.

Someday I shall return!

  • Like 1

Little surprises 'round every corner, but nothing dangerous

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just today actually I think I solved my problem. The forks I us are from ateco, they are the full stainless ones (I think they have others with wooded handles). Anywho, Kerry sent me pictures of what hers looked like, and I noticed they were bent at the tines. I've been trying to come up with a way to bend mine at the base of the handle (I didn't have a vice or anything, and I'm not very mechanical) but today I just bent the tines how I wanted them, and they seem to hold up fine. I was afraid the tines would be too delicate to bend, but they are fine. This is just a simple solution for what I needed, I have no doubt that Kerrys forks are much more durable, but what I do with dipping is on the limited side, and was trying to figure a way to make a simple modification to these forks that are cheap enough that I wouldnt feel bad about destroying :-)

 

I have a couple of those and did the same thing.  I think as long as you're not bending them back and forth and weakening the  metal you should be fine.  I don't do much hand dipping though.  I have a hard time with how thin the handles are, I feel like i need big clunky 'good grips' type handles to not make my hand go numb :sad:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 I signed up for two outdoor weekly markets this summer, will be making lots of pate de fruits so I have something that won't melt!  Flavors of the moment: nectarine, raspberry-apricot, blueberry-ginger (with some morello cherry puree because the blueberries were a bit insipid) and strawberry-rhubarb.  Using fresh fruit may end up being a challenge... though that rarely stops me :laugh:

 

pate de fruits.jpg

  • Like 10
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

On Thursday evening Kerry Beal and I did a charity gig for the Brain Injury Association of Peel and Halton (BIAPH). We set up a cookie and truffle decorating station and participants could each decorate a chocolate-dipped Oreo cookie and a vanilla truffle (Kerry made enormous truffles to give them a "canvas").

image.jpg

The decorating station is all set up with spares ready beside the microwave (which decided to act up and almost caused me to go into panic mode. Kerry stayed cool as usual).

image.jpg

Kerry filling squeeze bottles with tempered chocolate.

image.jpg

There were a fair number of artistic types but an equal number who were perfectly happy to just grab an Oreo and run! During the speeches many Oreos and truffles were surreptitiously consumed.

Edited to fix a typo.

Edited by Anna N (log)
  • Like 12

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

Link to comment
Share on other sites

IMG_0412.jpg

 

Continuing prep for fun fair this Thursday - I made a couple of pans of Rice Krispie treats that I then dipped in milk chocolate and drizzled with dark. Finished up the chocolate with some ginger and freeze dried lemon bark and some almond smoked salt bark.

 

Tomorrow I hope to make a couple of panned items and sponge toffee. 

  • Like 8
Link to comment
Share on other sites

IMG_0417.jpg

 

So one of the last things I finished up before the fun fair was a batch of sponge toffee - it turned out perfectly! Too bad it didn't sell!

 

IMG_0419.jpg

 

IMG_0420.jpg

 

IMG_0421.jpg

 

IMG_0422.jpg

 

Setting up at the fun fair.  

  • Like 10
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes they are - they taste kinda like chewy turkish delight done that way. They are always popular - probably sold more of them today than anything else (not saying much given the disappointing day) - but kids seem to love them I suspect because they recognize what they are.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Looks ace, of course! How are you panning? Hand, or mechanism?

attachicon.gifIMG_0417.jpg

 

So one of the last things I finished up before the fun fair was a batch of sponge toffee - it turned out perfectly! Too bad it didn't sell!

 

attachicon.gifIMG_0419.jpg

 

attachicon.gifIMG_0420.jpg

 

attachicon.gifIMG_0421.jpg

 

attachicon.gifIMG_0422.jpg

 

Setting up at the fun fair.  

Little surprises 'round every corner, but nothing dangerous

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Very cool Kerry! The malted milk balls, do you make the centers, or are they purchased? I was looking into that today, I was surprised to see that you can buy the malted milk centers, but had trouble finding how they are made. Also, in the last picture, did you make those colorful panned items? I dont know what they are, but they look awesome! I love your work, seriously.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Looks ace, of course! How are you panning? Hand, or mechanism?

I have the DeBuyer pan that goes on the Kitchen Aid - and falls out of the 6 quart Kitchen Aid!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Very cool Kerry! The malted milk balls, do you make the centers, or are they purchased? I was looking into that today, I was surprised to see that you can buy the malted milk centers, but had trouble finding how they are made. Also, in the last picture, did you make those colorful panned items? I dont know what they are, but they look awesome! I love your work, seriously.

Purchased - first batch from Nuts.com, second batch from Superior Nuts (aka Nuts in Bulk) - the second batch were less expensive and nicer, lighter centres.

 

They are made under vacuum - not an easy thing to do at home.

 

I made up that container full of panned items with a bunch of odds and ends I had left - there is quite a variety of things in there - the person who guessed closest to the number of items in there took it!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So one of the last things I finished up before the fun fair was a batch of sponge toffee - it turned out perfectly! Too bad it didn't sell!

 

Sponge toffee...it looks like Butterfinger candy bars. Is it crispy/crunchy or soft?

If it's /crispycrunchy you could always label it "Futterbingers" so people would know what it tastes like.

 

I am in awe of your continued great work in chocolate.

 

“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sponge toffee...it looks like Butterfinger candy bars. Is it crispy/crunchy or soft?

If it's /crispycrunchy you could always label it "Futterbingers" so people would know what it tastes like.

 

I am in awe of your continued great work in chocolate.

Sponge toffee isn't at all reminiscent of Butterfingers in taste or texture. I'm not a real big fan of sponge toffee. I like making it, it's a pretty cool thing watching the syrup puff into a big foam that hardens into a candy sponge, but I don't eat much of it. I do like Butterfingers and have tried to replicate it... without success.

 

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By artiesel
      Has anyone successfully made candied chestnuts (marrons glace) at home which even remotely resemble the professional ones you get from Europe?
       
      I've tried making them using RTE Chinese chestnuts from Costco with varying success:
      One batch became leathery after being simmered in (what started out as) simple syrup which had its sucrose concentration gradually increased.
       
      I have also tried soaking the chestnuts in hot water prior to beginning the candying process.  The nuts, once again, developed a tough skin after a few days.  To reverse the tough skins I added more water to the syrup, broke the nuts up into pieces and simmered them gently for a few hours.
      While some pieces have a tough skin, many of them have taken on a candied texture.
       
      Should any further attempts to candy chestnuts be attempted using the method of slowly simmering them in simple syrup?
       
      Please share any feedback ypu may have.  Thanks!
    • By ShylahSinger
      Hello! I'm fairly new to this site so I don't know if my search was weak. I'm trying to find a way to make Mandarin orange puree at home, but I couldn't find anything even similar in the forum. I am a home cook, but I have been making chocolate bonbons and other confections for over 4 years (intermitantly). It is too expensive for me to purchase this online- not because of the price of the puree, but the cost of shipping makes it prohibative. The recipes I've seen online are all differant and don't seem to be what I need. 
      I would love any help with this! I look forward to hearing and learning from those who have much, much more experience than me. Thanks!
    • By ShylahSinger
      Help! I am an amateur and make chocolate truffles, bonbons, and caramels for friends and family. I made some soft caramel for filling molded bonbons. The flavor and consistency are fine, but the caramel is filled with bubbles. I don't know how to get the air bubbles out, and am concerned using it in my molded chocolates. I would like to know if it is okay to use. I have been making confections for about four years and this is the first time this has happened. I would really appreciate any help! I'm new to the forum and don't know anyone yet.
    • By amyneill
      Hi all!! 
      I work at an amazing little New Zealand Style ice cream shop in the beautiful Denver Colorado. I was hoping to get a little help on the subject of adding fruit into ice cream after extracting it and ensuring that, when the ice cream is frozen, the fruity bits don't turn into rock hard shards. I am planning on doing a cherry chocolate ice cream and I was going to soak some dried cherries that we're no longer using for something else. I was planning on using some brandy and a ton of sugar, but I was really hoping someone had a tried and true method they could send my way so that I KNOW that the fruit will be luscious as it's frozen. If you have a certain sugar ratio. I know there is the brix test, but to be honest it's been many years since pastry school and I am very rusty. Would love to hear from some of my fellow sugar-heads. 
      Thank you!
      Amy
       
    • By amyneill
      Hi all! I just wanted to pop in here and see if anyone had some advice on canning/jarring caramel sauce for ready-to-eat consumption. The ice cream shop I work at is putting together gift baskets for valentine's day and we wanted to toss in some caramel and fudge jars in to add some tasty treats. We have a recipe that works great in the shop in our squeeze bottles for topping the ice cream, however I don't have a ton of experience with the canning process to make it shelf stable and shippable. I've canned tomato sauce and salsa in the past, but my method wouldn't be efficient for canning hundreds of jars for consumption. What is your method for success? Does it all hinge on the sealing process, and if so what are your favorite (cost efficient) products? Do you know of a jar that is self sealing or more durable than others?
      Thanks for any suggestions! 
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...