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Confections! What did we make? (2014 – 2016)


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So, as I dig deeper into this chocolates thing, I'm beginning to see that a large part of the learning curve must be figuring out how to do this without making a big f'ing mess. :D

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It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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The soft ganache wound up not being an issue but I did have 3 of the 24 bunnies absolutely refuse to leave the molds. The 21 that escaped look good. No temper issues that I can see, nice and shiny. Those 3 just wouldn't budge. I wacked the mold so much the bottoms broke off the chocolates and they still didn't move. Wasn't too disappointing, I looked at the molds from underneath before filling and could see that those 3 hadn't separated from the mold like the rest. Probably should have just skipped filling them but optimism pushed me to go ahead. As a beginner, I can live with a 21 out of 24 success ratio but curiosity has me wondering why those 3 wouldn't exit. Forced me to wash the mold so now I'm in delay mode while they dry.

Thanks Kerry! Found the thread, gonna read through it while I wait for my molds to dry.

Edited by Tri2Cook (log)

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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53 minutes ago, Tri2Cook said:

So, as I dig deeper into this chocolates thing, I'm beginning to see that a large part of the learning curve must be figuring out how to do this without making a big f'ing mess. :D

Truer words were ne'er spoken.  :S

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Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

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31 minutes ago, Tri2Cook said:

The soft ganache wound up not being an issue but I did have 3 of the 24 bunnies absolutely refuse to leave the molds. The 21 that escaped look good. No temper issues that I can see, nice and shiny. Those 3 just wouldn't budge. I wacked the mold so much the bottoms broke off the chocolates and they still didn't move. Wasn't too disappointing, I looked at the molds from underneath before filling and could see that those 3 hadn't separated from the mold like the rest. Probably should have just skipped filling them but optimism pushed me to go ahead. 

 

If there are items that don't want to come out, you can put the mold in the fridge for 10-15 minutes and then try to get them out again. If they are still stuck, into the fridge again. Eventually they should come out without banging them out. Could try the freezer too, might lead to condensation issues but less mold washing.

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10 minutes ago, curls said:

 

If there are items that don't want to come out, you can put the mold in the fridge for 10-15 minutes and then try to get them out again. If they are still stuck, into the fridge again. Eventually they should come out without banging them out. Could try the freezer too, might lead to condensation issues but less mold washing.

I go three minutes at a time in the freezer for things that won't let go that's usually enough to make a difference. And that's after they've already spent their time in the fridge.I go three minutes at a time in the freezer for things that won't let go that's usually enough to make a difference. And that's after they've already spent their time in the fridge.

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I'll file those tips away for next time. Too late for this round, I beat the bottom off of them. Not wanting total waste, I scooped the fillings out with the broken off bottoms and ate them. :D

Edited by Tri2Cook (log)
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It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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My Easter 2016 collection:

 

 

dutton.jpg.88ce3afa65d900e0ed3ea1aaa64a4

 

top row:  (1) layers of blood orange ganache and salted caramel, molded in dark chocolate, (2) gingerbread-flavored ganache, dipped in dark chocolate, topped with muscovado sugar, (3) layers of apricot preserves and marzipan, molded in dark chocolate, (4) toasted pinenut ganache with anise, molded in milk chocolate

 

middle row:  (1) mint ganache, molded in dark chocolate, (2) lime cream, molded in white chocolate, (3) layers of coffee ganache and hazelnut gianduja, dipped in dark chocolate, topped with a toasted hazelnut, (4) strawberry cream, molded in white chocolate

 

bottom row:  (1) layers of black currant ganache and crispy hazelnut gianduja, dipped in milk chocolate, (2) banana coconut cream with coconut rum, molded in white chocolate, (3) layers of raspberry preserves and peanut butter mousse, molded in milk chocolate, (4) apple caramel, molded in milk chocolate

Edited by Jim D.
error in uploading file (log)
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 image.thumb.jpg.32f625efa1542a2dd31d9afd

 

Bought a WW2 Fokker triplane model at Homesense because I wanted the little wooden propeller. Fortunately hubby likes the plane and is prepared to put the prop back on it after I'm done with it. So I made a gelatin mold with it and I'm knocking out a few props for a project that @alleguede is working on.image.thumb.jpg.8287e48d9252c1fb0ca72c58

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Gelatin-molded propellers! I look forward to the reveal of whatever this is going to be.

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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2 minutes ago, Kerry Beal said:

That will be up to @alleguede to report on!


Hopefully he does... I'm curious now. :D

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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9 hours ago, Tri2Cook said:

 As a beginner, I can live with a 21 out of 24 success ratio but curiosity has me wondering why those 3 wouldn't exit. 

 

Were all 3 around the same spot or in different areas.  What I've found is depending on how I hold the molds the heat from my hand will sometimes throw certain shells out of temper and those will be the ones that won't release.  I follow Kerry's lead when that occurs and first put them in the fridge to see if they will release, and then if that doesn't work, pop them in the freezer for a few minutes then try again.  I've also found that after they come out of the freezer, if I put light pressure on the mold at opposite corners while having the mold slightly off the table it will sometimes help to release the chocolate, depending on the mold.  It happens to all of us at one time or another, more often then you'd think :smile:

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I forgot to report back on the chocolate tasting party! I've been a little busy putting in new countertops and working on new cabinet doors in my house right now so I completely forgot! It went great.  Had 16 people for the tasting, they all gave really great feedback, mostly affirming my own suspicions, and I think the strawberry cheesecake was the hit of the evening with the fig jam and fig balsamic coming in a close second.  A great time was had by all!

 

IMG_3339-resized.jpg.c570423efd60f08de1f

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IMG_5278.JPG.jpeg.467ebd2fc84841b6f2fd18

 

Here's what @alleguede did with the propellors - Propellor Coffee roasts excellent coffee in Toronto - Alleguede will be providing them with baked goods for their stores. And chocolate!

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On 3/20/2016 at 7:35 PM, Jim D. said:

 

My Easter 2016 collection:

 

 

dutton.jpg.88ce3afa65d900e0ed3ea1aaa64a4

 

top row:  (1) layers of blood orange ganache and salted caramel, molded in dark chocolate, (2) gingerbread-flavored ganache, dipped in dark chocolate, topped with muscovado sugar, (3) layers of apricot preserves and marzipan, molded in dark chocolate, (4) toasted pinenut ganache with anise, molded in milk chocolate

 

middle row:  (1) mint ganache, molded in dark chocolate, (2) lime cream, molded in white chocolate, (3) layers of coffee ganache and hazelnut gianduja, dipped in dark chocolate, topped with a toasted hazelnut, (4) strawberry cream, molded in white chocolate

 

bottom row:  (1) layers of black currant ganache and crispy hazelnut gianduja, dipped in milk chocolate, (2) banana coconut cream with coconut rum, molded in white chocolate, (3) layers of raspberry preserves and peanut butter mousse, molded in milk chocolate, (4) apple caramel, molded in milk chocolate

 

Stunning.  How do you find the shelf-life of the mousse-filled bonbons?

 

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Ruth Wells:

The Aw reading for the peanut butter "mousse" was 0.43--very low.  Actually it is a meltaway (based on Greweling's recipe), using coconut oil and milk chocolate; I used the word "mousse" because I didn't think most people would have heard of the actual term.  I tried another truer mousse recently, actually a butter ganache that I whipped (based on a Wybauw recipe), and its Aw was 0.52.  I cannot attest to the long-term shelf life of these products, but, in theory at least, they should be fine with those low water activity readings.  They tasted fine for as long as I had any around (probably around 3 weeks).

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On 3/20/2016 at 7:35 PM, Jim D. said:

 

My Easter 2016 collection:

 

 

dutton.jpg.88ce3afa65d900e0ed3ea1aaa64a4

 

top row:  (1) layers of blood orange ganache and salted caramel, molded in dark chocolate, (2) gingerbread-flavored ganache, dipped in dark chocolate, topped with muscovado sugar, (3) layers of apricot preserves and marzipan, molded in dark chocolate, (4) toasted pinenut ganache with anise, molded in milk chocolate

 

middle row:  (1) mint ganache, molded in dark chocolate, (2) lime cream, molded in white chocolate, (3) layers of coffee ganache and hazelnut gianduja, dipped in dark chocolate, topped with a toasted hazelnut, (4) strawberry cream, molded in white chocolate

 

bottom row:  (1) layers of black currant ganache and crispy hazelnut gianduja, dipped in milk chocolate, (2) banana coconut cream with coconut rum, molded in white chocolate, (3) layers of raspberry preserves and peanut butter mousse, molded in milk chocolate, (4) apple caramel, molded in milk chocolate

 

Beautiful!!! And wonderful flavors as well.  can you describe your decorating technique for the mint ganache bon bon and the lime cream?

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"can you describe your decorating technique for the mint ganache bon bon and the lime cream?"

 

Thanks for your kind remarks.

 

For the mint:  This is a new (to me) mold I got at 1/3 price from a company getting rid of many of them.  I first splattered green cocoa butter, then brushed the mold with gold luster dust, then cast it in dark chocolate.  I must add that the real pain of this decoration is cleaning the mold afterward.  I still haven't gotten all the gold and green out of the corners of the cavities--and, of course, having square corners does not help.

 

For the lime:  I airbrushed about 2/3 of the leaf mold first with green, then the other third with gold, then cast in white chocolate.

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53 minutes ago, Jim D. said:

"can you describe your decorating technique for the mint ganache bon bon and the lime cream?"

 

Thanks for your kind remarks.

 

For the mint:  This is a new (to me) mold I got at 1/3 price from a company getting rid of many of them.  I first splattered green cocoa butter, then brushed the mold with gold luster dust, then cast it in dark chocolate.  I must add that the real pain of this decoration is cleaning the mold afterward.  I still haven't gotten all the gold and green out of the corners of the cavities--and, of course, having square corners does not help.

 

For the lime:  I airbrushed about 2/3 of the leaf mold first with green, then the other third with gold, then cast in white chocolate.

I love that rectangular mold.  What a great find.  I wonder if you can use a heat gun to make clean up easier.  

 

Can I ask which gold luster dust you use.  I'm still learning which ones are food grade and edible and which aren't.  

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10 hours ago, Bentley said:

I love that rectangular mold.  What a great find.  I wonder if you can use a heat gun to make clean up easier.  

 

Can I ask which gold luster dust you use.  I'm still learning which ones are food grade and edible and which aren't.  

I think the company selling those molds still has some--they are $8 each plus shipping.  If you want the link, I can PM it to you.

 

The luster dust can be found here.

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Bunny love...

bun1_zpsa8jqwpqc.jpg
 

I've pretty much given up on being able to take quality pictures that show things at their best, I just don't seem to have the knack, so this will have to do. They're nice and shiny in person. Did 2 dozen of each. That's the entire extent of my Easter work for this year. It was a fun learning experience... with a couple of mildly frustrating interludes and enough helpful advice from Kerry Beal that she should probably start charging me consulting fees. :)

Dark = Coffee Ganache + Dulce de Leche
Milk = Salted Caramel Ganache + Soft Caramel
White = Peanut Butter Ganache + Raspberry Jam

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It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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Had leftovers of each chocolate from making the bunnies in separate bowls so I decided to give the marbling thing a try. With mixed results, as can be seen in the picture. I was being so cautious about over-swirling the chocolate that I think I didn't swirl it enough. But I kinda got a feel for the basic idea so maybe they'll turn out better next time.

heartz1_zpsje7tbnyq.jpg

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It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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Actually, I like the marbling on those very much!  I think the one at the top with little squiggles is especially fun and intriguing, but they all look great. If you really don't think these look good, feel free to send me the rejects.  :D

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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