Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Confections! What did we make? (2014 – 2016)


Recommended Posts

A couple of Valentine's Day items...

IMG_4589.thumb.jpg.10cb46afa33dfa6b3acc5

 

60% dark chocolate shells with milk chocolate PB&J, milk chocolate salty caramel, and white chocolate orange caramel centers

IMG_4620.thumb.jpg.fff47a70950fe5449a05b

 

Seashells for a special order, I was told 'purple, turquoise, and aqua blue', I'm not sure what the difference between turquoise and aqua blue is, I hope they like them!  These pieces have white chocolate orange caramel and white chocolate passion fruit centers.

IMG_4667.thumb.jpg.a5baee833283358dee34e

 

IMG_4666.thumb.jpg.b21fa81c6d0f7429a7680

 

I used the cheap hobby molds for these so they are solid, not filled.  60% dark chocolate with bits of cocoa nib toffee

IMG_4673.thumb.jpg.c7b5cbfb25e3b2f820aca

 

A few more seashells, solid milk chocolate with bits of candied orange zest.

IMG_4677.thumb.jpg.03722cbdf2086bf623a05

 

Edited by pastrygirl (log)
  • Like 13
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, pastrygirl said:

Seashells for a special order, I was told 'purple, turquoise, and aqua blue', I'm not sure what the difference between turquoise and aqua blue is, I hope they like them!  These pieces have white chocolate orange caramel and white chocolate passion fruit centers.

IMG_4667.thumb.jpg.a5baee833283358dee34e

 

IMG_4666.thumb.jpg.b21fa81c6d0f7429a7680

 

I used the cheap hobby molds for these so they are solid, not filled.  60% dark chocolate with bits of cocoa nib toffee.

 

pastrygirl, gorgeous chocolate work as always!

 

Your seashells look like something that might naturally be found in the sea, despite the weird color palette your client specified. I hope they like them too. I sure do.

 

No wonder you're not sure about the difference between turquoise and aqua blue. Panatone, sort of an authority on color shades, returns this for turquoise, and nothing for aqua blue or aquamarine. Google images returns this for turquoise, and this for aqua blue. :unsure: 

 

Again, I love what you did within the dictates of the order. It could have turned out just weird, but you have made it a beautiful work of art. 

 

 

  • Like 1

> ^ . . ^ <

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, pastrygirl said:

Maybe it doesn't need a stir, just the act of ladling and pouring into the molds is enough to marble?  I'm not feeling very inspired about Easter yet, marbled bunny lollipops might be the ticket!

Maybe. Might be interesting to do a side by side.

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Thanks for the Crepes said:

 

Again, I love what you did within the dictates of the order. It could have turned out just weird, but you have made it a beautiful work of art. 

 

 

 

Thank you!  There were a few trays of ugly ones that got re-melted :(

Link to post
Share on other sites

sigh.... now that lots of people knows how to do it... it's going to be very hard to kill them all. LOL :):):)

nice job pastrygirl. do you mind if i ask you how much "(about)" you charge per candy? just trying to find out the range spread

great job kerry Beal giving step by step ... thank you both

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎2‎/‎24‎/‎2016 at 3:26 PM, fandi1 said:

HEY KEYCHRIS......

DON'T TELL THEM ANYTHING.... its will be OUR secret  LOL :):):);)

 

1 hour ago, fandi1 said:

do you mind if i ask you how much "(about)" you charge per candy? just trying to find out the range spread


The worm has turned... now you're the one wanting the information. :P :D

  • Like 1

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I JUST LOVE THIS PLACE!!!!!!!!!!!!:x

but,,, jokes aside...  this is the only place i have been able to find where people will help without being A@@'s

thank you for that to all of you who are reading and helping us little people

:)

thank you

 

this is some of my work with help from people here:

 

20141106_220221.jpg

20141105_231809.jpg

20141103_221504.jpg

20141026_184937.jpg

Edited by fandi1 (log)
  • Like 10
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, fandi1 said:

sigh.... now that lots of people knows how to do it... it's going to be very hard to kill them all. LOL :):):)

nice job pastrygirl. do you mind if i ask you how much "(about)" you charge per candy? just trying to find out the range spread

great job kerry Beal giving step by step ... thank you both

 

 

Fandi, I never charge enough!  For wholesale/industry (the seashell order came from a chef friend, I don't even know what the event is) I charge about $1-$1.50 per piece.  If they are boxed and I'm selling directly to the customer I'll charge more, but that also has to cover the cost of the box.  I try to keep prices around the range of my competitors, Fran's is the big one around here.  https://www.franschocolates.com/

 

When using rigid polycarbonate molds I ladle the chocolate in, but the flimsy hobby molds are harder to scrape clean when full of chocolate, so I piped those.  That's also why those are solid instead of a filled shell.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I realize nobody's going to believe me but, about 8 or 9 years ago I was trying to mimic the swirl finish Steve Vai used to use on his guitars on dessert pieces and gave this very technique a try. To swirl finish guitars, borax is used to break the surface tension in a large container of water, oil paints are floated on the surface, swirled to the desired effect, the guitar is dipped through the paint into the water below, the excess paint is brushed away from above the guitar and it's pulled out of the tank. The paint adheres to the guitar on it's way in. The problems with doing that precise technique with chocolate on edible items are self-evident so using a pool of white chocolate instead was something I tried. It didn't allow for the exact effect I was after and the white chocolate muted the colors more than I wanted so I moved on to other ideas. None of which were ever successful to my satisfaction. I doubt if anyone would remember it, but I posted a thread here asking about food safe ways to break the surface tension in a container of water back at that time. That was just after the attempt with the pool of white chocolate didn't work out as I hoped and I was trying to think of other ways to do it. I like the way that looks on those pops though. Makes me wish I'd done more with it so I'd have something to point to and wouldn't sound like I'm making this up now. :D

Just in case anybody's interested, this is a link to the effect I was going for and never achieved to any degree I was happy with.

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I read all about doing that with marbling on paper - carageenan was the magic in the water as I recall. Wanted to do it with chocolate.

 

http://marbleart.us/MarblingSupplies.htm

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
On 2/26/2016 at 4:12 AM, pastrygirl said:

Maybe it doesn't need a stir, just the act of ladling and pouring into the molds is enough to marble?  I'm not feeling very inspired about Easter yet, marbled bunny lollipops might be the ticket!

its really very, very simple- kerrys on the right track. work in layers, baselayer, drizzle 1 accent color, another baselayer, drizzle another accentcolor, another baselayer. then just run a spatula through the bowl - i normally just zig-zag through once and then ladle into the mould. make sure to empty the mould into a separate bowl - et voila, u have a marbled looking shell...

  • Like 1

/Magnus - happy amateur chocolatier

Link to post
Share on other sites

Getting started on Easter.  I finally sawed the alignment nubs off my 3-D egg molds to make filled half eggs easier.

 

56d4f16a0da5e_dolcettatruffleegg2.jpg.ae56d4f16b1420c_dolcettatruffleegg1.jpg.5a

 

And some bunny pops, I thought it was a cute shape, haven't done anything on a stick before so we'll see how they go over.

56d4f16b8d292_dolcettabunnypop.jpg.2b465

  • Like 10
Link to post
Share on other sites
41 minutes ago, curls said:

@pastrygirl what are you filling your eggs with? Very pretty eggs and cute bunnies.  :-)

 

I used my two most popular truffles as filling - dark chocolate salted caramel and milk chocolate peanut butter crisp (with feuilletine, actually a gianduja)

  • Like 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

I've found the bunny pops go over well - particularly the ones I have that have feet, ears and bunny butts only.


Have we seen those on here before and I missed it? They sound like they'd be an awesome combo with the f'ing bunny molds. I'm a fan of the irreverent and non-traditional.

  • Like 1

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
  • Similar Content

    • By CharTruff
      Hello! 
       
      I am doing some spring cleaning and am selling some of my used polycarbonate molds. I've attached pictures and dimensions below.  The mold prices do not include shipping fee. I will ship these via USPS priority mail. 
       
      For estimation purposes only, 4 - 5 molds can fit in a medium box and it costs $15.05 to ship. Please let me know if you have any questions.  
       
      Thank you. 
      Charlotte W. 





    • By eglies
      Hello everyone!
       
      I hope you are all safe and well  
       
      I have a question regarding Chef Rubber Natural Colours. Its very difficult to get them here in Europe (if anyone has any contacts or knows a company that sells that would be great) and anyone that has used this line, what colours would you recommend? 
       
      Thank you!
       
    • By eglies
      Hello everyone! 
       
      Im in need of your expertise! Ive been having troubles with my machine, or maybe not even my machine. 
      Ive attached an image (hopefully its clear) to show you a mould that has different tempering problems. I dont understand how one mould can have several different tempering issues. 
      Ive also been advised to have my machine between 30C-31C, however all ive known is to use dark chocolate between 31-32C. Ive done tests from 30C-32C and none have the outcome that is expected, that shiny chocolate. 
      Please share your knowledge  I really need it!! 
       
      Thank you!!! 
       

    • By Trufflenaut
      I need some advice on a safe(ish), easy, and fast way to cut buttermints   I often make buttermints for friends for the holidays, and have run into problems cutting them into bite size pieces before the sugar cools and starts to crystallize too much, so I'm looking for ideas on how to do it more quickly so I can do larger batches.  Note that I am doing this at home and have very little budget, but on the plus side I don't need to end up with perfectly uniform pieces.
       
      The basic process for making the buttermints is:
      1. cook butter and sugar to 260 degrees
      2. pour out onto buttered marble slab and let cool slightly
      3. add color and flavor, and pull like taffy while it cools further
      4. when it just starts to show signs of crystallizing, roll into ropes and cut before it crystallizes much further (I have maybe 2 minutes if I'm lucky to get all the cutting done)
       
      The main problem I run into is that when handling the candy during steps 3 and 4, my hands need to be buttered so the candy doesn't stick to me, and even if I quickly wash my hands, any cutting tool needs to also be buttered to prevent sticking, and basically it's nearly impossible to maintain a good grip on anything.  The second problem is that the candy at this point is hard enough that if I try to snip it with scissors it will tend to slide along the blade instead of getting cut, yet it is still plastic enough that if I pick it up it will tend to sag under its weight and thin out too much while I'm concentrating on getting the scissors to cut right.  My best results so far have been with leaving the candy on the marble and cutting it with a pastry scraper, but pressing down hard enough to cut all the way through with a slippery (due to the aforementioned buttered hands) pastry scraper while trying not to gouge the marble underneath is not particularly fun.  I did try pruning shears once because the curved blade holds the candy in place instead of sliding along the blade, which worked fine except for the fear of lopping off parts of a finger made it too nerve-wracking to be done quickly.
       
      Basically, I'd love to find something that works like this, but for something with the consistency of a hard caramel:
       
       
       
      Any ideas?
      -Trufflenaut
       
    • By onemorebitedelara.com
      Has anyone used Valrhona Absolut Crystal neutral glaze particularly to thicken a coulis or to glaze a tart?  If so, how did you like it and is there another glaze you think worked as well but is less expensive or can be purchased in smaller quantities?  
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...