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minas6907

Confections! What did we make? (2014 – 2016)

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16 hours ago, Jim D. said:

 

Could you say more about this airbrush?  Why is it better than the usual, and where can it be purchased?  I find airbrushing more frustrating than fun, so if this device made it fun for you, I'm interested.  Thanks for any help.

 

Your chocolates are beautiful.  Are the swirly ones done with finger-painting or with the airbrush?

 

Jim

 

Hello Jim, 

 

So the airbrush I picked up is nothing special, it's a Powermate and I bought it from Home Depot online.  Came in a 2 pack set for $60.  I'm currently using the smaller of the two guns, with a 0.8mm nozzle.  I've provided some pics below of what it looks like.  Why I like it so much it that it doesn't create such a cloud of cocoa butter that my badger did, and more importantly, it has a pressure regulator, so you can dial down how much air is coming through the gun, which allows you to splatter, which I could not do with my badger either.  I would have to use a toothbrush, and that got real old, real fast.  I used to have to clean up the badger after I used it, due to the tubes that pulled up the cocoa butter, and that got old after awhile.  This is a gravity feed, so I can just pour out what I don't use, spray out what's leftover in the gun, and I'm done.  I'll generally wipe down the cup after use as well so there isn't a bunch of color mixing, but that's about it.  It did take a little adjusting to get it exactly where I wanted it, but so far has been the easiest gun to use for what I want to use it for.  I do think that badger is a good introductory airbrush, and what's taken me so long to upgrade to the HVLP is that I was worried my tiny little pancake air compressor was not going to be able to keep up with the pressure needs of this larger airbrush, but it does just fine, so I'm stoked :D

 

As for the swirly ones, you are correct, I did finger-paint those, but then with some back sprayed with the gun. 

 

IMG_3324-resized.jpg.e9e690c7eeb5d318308IMG_3325-resized.jpg.11eaf4061ad3059ddfb

 

I hope this helps Jim!

 

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Very helpful information on the Powermate.  Thanks for taking the trouble to provide photos.  I will look into this product.

 

I currently use a Paasche (quite similar to a Badger).  It's a siphon type, not gravity fed.  When it works well, it is great, but sometimes I have use a heat gun after every few cavities.

 

Jim

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Home Depot has another set of HVLP guns as well - Husky. I'm not sure how they compare to the Powermates but I know that Chocolot has them. Sounds like the Powermates may have less issue with overspray. 

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16 minutes ago, Kerry Beal said:

Home Depot has another set of HVLP guns as well - Husky. I'm not sure how they compare to the Powermates but I know that Chocolot has them. Sounds like the Powermates may have less issue with overspray. 

 

There is still a small amount of overspray, but nothing like there is with my badger or when we watched Melissa down in LV.

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1 hour ago, Kerry Beal said:

Home Depot has another set of HVLP guns as well - Husky. I'm not sure how they compare to the Powermates but I know that Chocolot has them. Sounds like the Powermates may have less issue with overspray. 

I bought the Husky (Melissa uses them). Came 2 to the set. One is hvlp. Don't like them. Wastes too much color. A smaller gun like Willows makes sense.


Ruth Kendrick

Chocolot
Artisan Chocolates and Toffees
www.chocolot.com

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3 hours ago, Kerry Beal said:

So the Power mate guns can be attached to a small compressor?

 

 

 

Yep, (at least the smaller one can, haven't tried the larger gun, and don't really feel the need to) my air compressor is only 1 gallon...

 

http://www.amazon.com/Campbell-Hausfeld-FP2028-Compressor-Accessory/dp/B000BOCBAM/ref=sr_1_8?s=hi&ie=UTF8&qid=1455774925&sr=1-8&keywords=pancake+air+compressor

 

This is the model I have, but it generates enough pressure to keep it going, for the most part...if I'm spraying at full pressure to coat the inside of the mold it will sometimes have a lag on the color coming out, but it's not enough to slow me down.  Can still spray the mold (a full coating of the shell) in a minute or two.

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Dang girlfriend! They are so beautiful!!! Awesome job! Love the mango chili on the left. Looking gooooood. So very impressed! Your flavors typically are so amazing that Im sure your experiments will turn out awesome! Nice job Willow!!!

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Looking more into the Powermate sprayer, I am concerned whether my Iwata Smart Jet Pro compressor will work with it.  It has a max PSI of 35; the Powermate has a maximum of 60 psi.  Another concern: is there a standard size for the hose connecting compressor to sprayer?  I suppose I could always purchase an Iwata sprayer, but they are considerably more expensive.

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On February 18, 2016 at 5:56 PM, Chocolot said:

I bought the Husky (Melissa uses them). Came 2 to the set. One is hvlp. Don't like them. Wastes too much color. A smaller gun like Willows makes sense.

 

Chocolot - when you say it wastes too much color are you saying that because of residual color that stays in the cup?  I got one of these sprayers and have used it without the cup - just pour directly into the warm gun.  

 

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7 hours ago, pastryani said:

 

Chocolot - when you say it wastes too much color are you saying that because of residual color that stays in the cup?  I got one of these sprayers and have used it without the cup - just pour directly into the warm gun.  

 

 

It just seems to lay down way too much color. I went through a bottle of cb too quickly.


Ruth Kendrick

Chocolot
Artisan Chocolates and Toffees
www.chocolot.com

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19 hours ago, Jim D. said:

Looking more into the Powermate sprayer, I am concerned whether my Iwata Smart Jet Pro compressor will work with it.  It has a max PSI of 35; the Powermate has a maximum of 60 psi.  Another concern: is there a standard size for the hose connecting compressor to sprayer?  I suppose I could always purchase an Iwata sprayer, but they are considerably more expensive.

I have the same compressor Jim. This is my question as well. I would love to find something that works with my compressor. I will investigate and let you know what I find out.


Edited by Gwbyls (log)

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I recently finished a couple of courses (Chocolates and Pralines levels 3 & 4) at Savour Chocolate & Patisserie School in Melbourne, with Paul Kennedy and Robyn Curnow. Here's a bunch of pictures of the products we did :)

 

DSC_79292_zpsljthbd9y.jpg

 

DSC_79322_zpsfsqtvify.jpg

Coriander and hazelnut praline

 

DSC_79332_zpsbf5anloi.jpg

Marscapone ganache

 

DSC_79352_zpsdhxsaz6c.jpg

Mandarin

 

DSC_79362_zpszqbruz5s.jpg

 

DSC_79372_zpsorramzrr.jpg

 

DSC_79402_zpsfwvpzndn.jpg

 

DSC_79412_zpsaiwqykz0.jpg

 

DSC_79592_zpscbibqga2.jpg

 

DSC_79522_zpsjbhsqvrr.jpg

 

DSC_79532_zpsnjqqoapd.jpg

 

DSC_79542_zpsjqkj0k6x.jpg

 

DSC_79552_zps1u4alcjo.jpg

 

DSC_79562_zpsd21e7h4u.jpg

 

DSC_79572_zpsppetsqhu.jpg

 

DSC_79682_zpsrsrazknt.jpg

 

DSC_79752_zpsca0hllwr.jpg

 

DSC_79692_zpsxm9my4hk.jpg

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That's beautiful stuff, keychris...and some great names, too. :)

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Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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They are indeed beautiful, Chris.  In the third photo from the end, how was the marbled effect accomplished?  And what sort of airbrush/spray gun was used in the class?

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13 hours ago, keychris said:

I've sent you guys a PM :D

They look great Keychris. I had the same question on the marbled effect. I would love to know.  Thanks. :)

 

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On 20. feb. 2016 at 1:15 AM, Jim D. said:

And what sort of airbrush/spray gun was used in the class?

Oh wow - would love if you could reveal your secret to make this type of marble effect, Keychris ;-) ... Thanks in advance 

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On 2/21/2016 at 3:42 AM, LePetitPrince said:

Oh wow - would love if you could reveal your secret to make this type of marble effect, Keychris ;-) ... Thanks in advance 

 

 

HEY KEYCHRIS......

DON'T TELL THEM ANYTHING.... its will be OUR secret  LOL :):):);)

 

 

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So decided to play with the marble effect that Kriz and keychris have posted about here.  Brings to mind Joseph Schmit's work back when you could find it on the internet before Hershey bought him.

 

IMG_1789.jpg.2c65bdc0083d79328f4aac0cabf

 

IMG_1790.jpg.82fb39e0e2aa5cb943b34a57b26

 

IMG_1791.jpg.df1a645878db51b1cd66fa851b9

 

IMG_1792.jpg.c8f52266d05c18a5482fe39a202

Alternating layers of different chocolate. 

IMG_1793.jpg.fa5b4c6de21786f54b6d197b997

 

A little stir.

 

IMG_1794.jpg.de22e0b27aa1ff3bfb3a5d43019

 

Pour into the molds.

 

IMG_1798.jpg.28c89029670b2e52c75b60c0b4a

 

IMG_1800.jpg.a79e17e4c012629f19529a47592

 

Clearly a whole lot more white is needed to show off the effect. 

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Maybe it doesn't need a stir, just the act of ladling and pouring into the molds is enough to marble?  I'm not feeling very inspired about Easter yet, marbled bunny lollipops might be the ticket!

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