Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

Confections! What did we make? (2014 – 2016)


minas6907
 Share

Recommended Posts

Made tons of things tonight! and finally whipped out my ancient DSLR for some less terrible photos.

 

DSC_2245.JPGDSC_2261.JPG

Rosemary ganache truffles

 

DSC_2248.JPGDSC_2267.JPG

Milk chocolate almond rochers(flavored with rum)

 

DSC_2256.JPGDSC_2269.JPG

Caramel and peanut gianduja bars, enrobed w/ caramelized white chocolate

 

DSC_2253.JPGDSC_2268.JPG

White chocolate covered 'cinnamon latte' caramels

 

DSC_2284.JPGDSC_2257.JPG

Espresso ganache and bitter caramel sauce, molded in milk chocolate

 

  • Like 10
Link to comment
Share on other sites

22834369115_a93aa03975.jpg

EXTRA sour grape gumdrops 

for a birthday party tomorrow 

very rustic sorry.. I have no patience to make sure they are perfect visually but they do taste good! puckery good! extra citric acid  mixed in with the sugar coating and the grape juice was raw extracted and super sour but very strong solid  supper concentrated concord grape flavored juice ..so these are a success and the inside is a very nice jelly candy texture I think you can see through them,  almost ..I really like the extra sour as well .The kids who planted the grapes … will get to eat these tomorrow it wold have been more fun if they could have made the candy today.. but the party is tomorrow and they had school ..darn the more important things in life 

 

hummingbirdkiss,

 

Those concord grape gumdrops look right up my alley. Rotuts would like them too, I think, as he is the one who coined the term "tart tooth", which I never knew how to describe properly before he turned me on to it.

 

The homemade shapes are artisan, and only add value to me. I wish I could have been one of the ones enjoying them.

  • Like 1

> ^ . . ^ <

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Some treats for Thanksgiving... chocolate truffles, mints, and muscovado sugar salted caramels. Will also make some salted pumpkin caramels and I am thinking about trying to make a cranberry or cranberry & raspberry pate de fruit.

IMG_7747-chocolate truffles.jpg IMG_7743-mint chocolates.jpg IMG_7736-muscovado salted caramels.jpg

 

  • Like 13
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Curls: those look fantastic!  I love the rustic finish, too. The thought of Pumpkin caramels makes my mouth water.  Last fall, I was coerced into making a pumpkin-ale caramel.. and I am so glad that I did!  I didn't think that the flavor would come through very well, but it proved me wrong.   Have fun with it!

-An

  • Like 1

-Andrea

 

A 'balanced diet' means chocolate in BOTH hands. :biggrin:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

omg I am always embarrassed to post under these stunning confections but that is the nice thing about this place "room for all" and on that note (if I already posted these forgive me I am really tried and not sleeping well at all lately ..excuses excuses) ..but I did make some cracker jack! 

 

/22284688893_ca2ab7a840.jpg

 

 

this has been my dinner I am ashamed to admit for a few nights now probably the reason I am so tired I am eating like crap lately 

 

 

has anyone used "mushroom popcorn" for caramel corn ? if so is it the same as the extra large ? I used Amish extra large for this and really like it nice big corns 

Edited by hummingbirdkiss (log)
  • Like 14
why am I always at the bottom and why is everything so high? 

why must there be so little me and so much sky?

Piglet 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well, it is craft show time again...and like many of you...I'm in full production right now. If I can find one of my kids with a charged up I-pod, I-phone or I-whatever, we will get some pics on here.  But first, I have got to bow down and profusely thank Kriz (Hoofschocolates) for posting his uber-cool method with the swirly colors.  I just did it with blue, green and white...and WOW!!!  Bailey's Irish Creme truffles never looked so cool! :biggrin:  Going back to play in the workshop!  hopefully, we will have some pics later.....

  • Like 6

-Andrea

 

A 'balanced diet' means chocolate in BOTH hands. :biggrin:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Here are some earl grey bonbons I finally made for my boss' birthday. I was going for enrobed ganache but it came out too soft so I whipped the ganache and piped it into molds. I'm not that good at filling molds (I usually mess up the bottoms!) but I'm happy at how these turned out! They're dusted with a little silver dust.

Ruth

earlgrey bonbons.jpg

  • Like 9
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Rajoress-

Those sound(and look) divine :wub:  I'm always such a sucker for tea infused treats... You've got a very lucky boss there. I also love how the sliver lustre dust goes with the shape of your mold; really makes the shine stand out without overpowering the chocolate's own color! Did you just brush the dust on after demolding?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks so much excv_ for your nice comments! You are correct, after unmolding the chocolates I brushed on a little silver luster dust with a pastry brush to make them stand out. I'm in awe of everyone here who uses colored cocoa butter to color their chocolates, I haven't advanced to that stage yet!!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

IMG_4295.jpg

 

I usually don't make peanut brittle, but did this for a friend. I realize I really do enjoy eating it! Reminds me of my mother. She would always make a lot of peanut brittle. She stretched it thin so it didn't mess with your teeth. Might have to make more.

  • Like 12

Ruth Kendrick

Chocolot
Artisan Chocolates and Toffees
www.chocolot.com

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I don't usually like peanut brittle, but I'd give yours a try.  It looks delicately crunchy and beautiful!

  • Like 1

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

Link to comment
Share on other sites

My SOD (Seasonal Obsessive Disorder - subtype candy making) is kicking in - I am starting preparation for my yearly holiday gifts. Strictly amateur but lots of fun. Nothing chocolate yet - that starts next week. So far it is pretty monotone but that will change. 

 

I'm making lollipops this year - raspberry; saffron, vanilla and ginger with brandy; and salted chocolate caramel.

DSC00436.jpg

 

Sesame candy with almonds and orange and lemon zest, and cashew butter crunch

DSC00440.jpg

 

Peanut brittle and candied orange peel.

You can see the peel-less oranges lurking in the background. Hopefully we will eat them before they dry out.

DSC00439.jpg

Edited by ElainaA (log)
  • Like 3

If you have a garden and a library, you have everything you need. Cicero

But the library must contain cookbooks. Elaina

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

So many superb looking (and no doubt tasting) chocolates and other goodies here... 

 

I'm currently working on some gift chocolates for family and friends. I'm not sure if I've ever achieved excellent temper on the chocolates I've done, but they've been okay enough. This year I decided to put a little more effort to get it right. In the EZTemper topic I think it was said that you first heat the chocolate to 45-48°C, then cool to 33.5-35°C and stir in 1% cocoa butter which has been held at 33.5°C. Pour in molds and you should be done in about an hour. Question nr 1, is it necessary to hold the cocoa butter in that temp for hours? If not, how precisely should be 33.5°C? Just thinking that I don't have a SV setup, so just working with thermapen and pots basically. Would it work? 

The other two methods I've written down are to heat part of chocolate to 46°C, drop in fresh chunks and stir until 27°C and heat back to 31-32°C (keep there for 5min, never above 33°C). Or, heat 2 parts chocolate not above 45°C, adding 1 part, stirring until 31.5°C with dark chocolate and 30°C for milk/white. Any comments about those methods are welcome as well. I haven't had great success with being able to add 1 part to 2 parts melted and actually have it all melt. 

 

Then on the filling side. I pulled together a "Hervé mousse" variant that I'll use and then a lemon curd filling. But I also infused water and whole milk with butter popcorn, and was thinking of the best way to get those into the chocolate fillings. The water one I think I could do the Hervé way, but does anyone have an idea if I could do some sort of fluid gel with the whole milk? I've got for example agar, xanthan, high-acyl gellan, kappa & iota carrageenan in my pantry to work with. 

 

Thanks for all the input!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, EsaK said:

 In the EZTemper topic I think it was said that you first heat the chocolate to 45-48°C, then cool to 33.5-35°C and stir in 1% cocoa butter which has been held at 33.5°C. Pour in molds and you should be done in about an hour. Question nr 1, is it necessary to hold the cocoa butter in that temp for hours? If not, how precisely should be 33.5°C? Just thinking that I don't have a SV setup, so just working with thermapen and pots basically. Would it work?

 

This will only work with the eztemper silk cocoa butter.

 

As for tempering, browse https://forums.egullet.org/topic/19524-tempering-chocolate/ for more info :) I can message you more details you if want, but tempering is covered pretty exhaustively on here ;)

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So this morning I went over to help a fellow who has a chocolate business that mainly does children's parties. He's branching out into some team building projects and tomorrow has some sort of deal where the folks from the newspaper will be coming over to watch him work. So we were brainstorming building a bridge - he'll give the participants the guidelines and the materials and they then work in teams to build a bridge. 

 

IMG_1518.jpg.672c7c1bb1b69c18940a6e07003

 

Here's what a couple of hours of work and a crap load of rice krispie squares got us. Great potential I think when some talented teams apply themselves to it.

 

  • Like 9
Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, keychris said:

 

This will only work with the eztemper silk cocoa butter.

 

As for tempering, browse https://forums.egullet.org/topic/19524-tempering-chocolate/ for more info :) I can message you more details you if want, but tempering is covered pretty exhaustively on here ;)

 

 

Ahh, I thought it'd be the same with any cocoa butter.. Thanks for the heads up! 

 

keychris or anyone else, any thoughts on the filling side? Would love to hear thoughts on how to get those popcorn infusions to work in a way that doesn't mask their flavor.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Not posting any additional photos of the confection...just reporting that I am into copycat Enstrom toffee making for all the folks in our private and commercial life.  My signature confection is a copycat.  How shameful can one get.  :blush::laugh::laugh:

  • Like 3

Darienne

 

learn, learn, learn...

 

Life in the Meadows and Rivers

Cheers & Chocolates

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Holiday chocolates this year. It's always easiest just to feed people :). But, still wears me out with working in a restaurant and then coming home to do these.

Starting at the top dome:

Coconut Creme (really fast buttercream coconut filling, mainly for my mother :) )

Red Wine (butter ganache with Nocking Point Wicked Aim Cabernet-still gotta work on the wine thing, hard to get the wine to show through enough)

Spiced Orange Tea (white ganache with orange spice tea, orange oil and extra cloves)

Peppermint (white ganache with crushed peppermint)

Passion Fruit (white ganache with passion fruit, orange zest and PF liqueur)

Absinthe (dark ganache with Pacifique Absinthe)

Black Raspberry (dark ganache with black raspberry purée, very yummy)

Peanut Butter with ground honey roasted peanuts

Mexican Coffee (milk and dark chocolate ganache steeped with Verve espresso, vanilla bean, cinnamon sticks and Kahlua)

Honey Vanilla Caramels in the middle, one with Maldon flakes and one with smoked Maldon. 

 

 

image.jpeg

Edited by RWood (log)
  • Like 16
Link to comment
Share on other sites

My Christmas Collection for Family and Friends this year. All up I made ~100-115 of each flavour. The theme was fruit and nuts, but the caramels and gingerbread are traditional favourites and had to be included as well.

Chocs2015.jpg

  • Like 11
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
 Share

  • Similar Content

    • By artiesel
      Has anyone successfully made candied chestnuts (marrons glace) at home which even remotely resemble the professional ones you get from Europe?
       
      I've tried making them using RTE Chinese chestnuts from Costco with varying success:
      One batch became leathery after being simmered in (what started out as) simple syrup which had its sucrose concentration gradually increased.
       
      I have also tried soaking the chestnuts in hot water prior to beginning the candying process.  The nuts, once again, developed a tough skin after a few days.  To reverse the tough skins I added more water to the syrup, broke the nuts up into pieces and simmered them gently for a few hours.
      While some pieces have a tough skin, many of them have taken on a candied texture.
       
      Should any further attempts to candy chestnuts be attempted using the method of slowly simmering them in simple syrup?
       
      Please share any feedback ypu may have.  Thanks!
    • By ShylahSinger
      Hello! I'm fairly new to this site so I don't know if my search was weak. I'm trying to find a way to make Mandarin orange puree at home, but I couldn't find anything even similar in the forum. I am a home cook, but I have been making chocolate bonbons and other confections for over 4 years (intermitantly). It is too expensive for me to purchase this online- not because of the price of the puree, but the cost of shipping makes it prohibative. The recipes I've seen online are all differant and don't seem to be what I need. 
      I would love any help with this! I look forward to hearing and learning from those who have much, much more experience than me. Thanks!
    • By ShylahSinger
      Help! I am an amateur and make chocolate truffles, bonbons, and caramels for friends and family. I made some soft caramel for filling molded bonbons. The flavor and consistency are fine, but the caramel is filled with bubbles. I don't know how to get the air bubbles out, and am concerned using it in my molded chocolates. I would like to know if it is okay to use. I have been making confections for about four years and this is the first time this has happened. I would really appreciate any help! I'm new to the forum and don't know anyone yet.
    • By amyneill
      Hi all!! 
      I work at an amazing little New Zealand Style ice cream shop in the beautiful Denver Colorado. I was hoping to get a little help on the subject of adding fruit into ice cream after extracting it and ensuring that, when the ice cream is frozen, the fruity bits don't turn into rock hard shards. I am planning on doing a cherry chocolate ice cream and I was going to soak some dried cherries that we're no longer using for something else. I was planning on using some brandy and a ton of sugar, but I was really hoping someone had a tried and true method they could send my way so that I KNOW that the fruit will be luscious as it's frozen. If you have a certain sugar ratio. I know there is the brix test, but to be honest it's been many years since pastry school and I am very rusty. Would love to hear from some of my fellow sugar-heads. 
      Thank you!
      Amy
       
    • By amyneill
      Hi all! I just wanted to pop in here and see if anyone had some advice on canning/jarring caramel sauce for ready-to-eat consumption. The ice cream shop I work at is putting together gift baskets for valentine's day and we wanted to toss in some caramel and fudge jars in to add some tasty treats. We have a recipe that works great in the shop in our squeeze bottles for topping the ice cream, however I don't have a ton of experience with the canning process to make it shelf stable and shippable. I've canned tomato sauce and salsa in the past, but my method wouldn't be efficient for canning hundreds of jars for consumption. What is your method for success? Does it all hinge on the sealing process, and if so what are your favorite (cost efficient) products? Do you know of a jar that is self sealing or more durable than others?
      Thanks for any suggestions! 
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...