Jump to content
  • Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create a free account.

minas6907

Confections! What did we make? (2014 – 2016)

Recommended Posts

They are made under vacuum - not an easy thing to do at home.

 

Even at your home??

 

 

But out of interest, how do they do it?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

attachicon.gifIMG_0412.jpg

 

Continuing prep for fun fair this Thursday - I made a couple of pans of Rice Krispie treats that I then dipped in milk chocolate and drizzled with dark.

 

 

If I might return to this post and ask a question of Kerry. 

 

The Rice Krispie treats do not present a smooth surface but are full of nicks and crannies which when I dipped them took up an inordinate amount of chocolate.  :blush:   I gave up in frustration partway through, having exhausted my supply of tempered chocolate.  A few days later, when I had some leftover tempered chocolate after dipping some pretzel logs, I tried brushing the chocolate onto the krispie treats with one of those small silicone pastry brushes and it worked well...but would have been too much work for the entire production.

 

Now the question:  did you simply dip the treat into a container of chocolate and this worked well?

Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Since the kids and grandkids will be over tomorrow, I decided I needed some treats for them. I've been playing with the Eztemper, but mostly with dark chocolate. Today, I made some crackle bar by adding Rice Krispies to milk chocolate. It only took 15 minutes from 100F degree chocolate to finished bars. The Eztemper silk is a beautiful thing.

 

FullSizeRender-2.jpg

 

Less than 5 minutes later

FullSizeRender-1.jpg

 

Finished  15 minutes total!!

FullSizeRender-4.jpg

 

 

  • Like 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I might return to this post and ask a question of Kerry. 

 

The Rice Krispie treats do not present a smooth surface but are full of nicks and crannies which when I dipped them took up an inordinate amount of chocolate.  :blush:   I gave up in frustration partway through, having exhausted my supply of tempered chocolate.  A few days later, when I had some leftover tempered chocolate after dipping some pretzel logs, I tried brushing the chocolate onto the krispie treats with one of those small silicone pastry brushes and it worked well...but would have been too much work for the entire production.

 

Now the question:  did you simply dip the treat into a container of chocolate and this worked well?

Thanks.

Yup - just dip into a container of tempered milk chocolate - they do use a fair amount - and because they are such good insulators they need to go into the fridge fairly quickly or the latent heat of crystallization can actually cause them to bloom.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Kerry. I  used a combination of  70% and 54% dark chocolate and did not have any trouble with bloom.   Didn't put them into the fridge either...didn't realize that I should have.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just had a quick question, and thought to post here rather then start a whole new topic. Recently, the Restaurant Depot by my place started carrying more Callebaut products. Until now, they never really had any cocoa powder worth checking out, but they started stocking two cocoa powders from Callabeut. Would someone be able to chime in to tell me the difference between the regular and the one labeled high fat? What are the different applications? I've never done much more with cocoa powder other then use as a coating for truffles (and more recently, for panned items). I always had a container of Hersheys that would get used very slowly, sometimes my wife would bake an items or something, but it just doesnt get used much. Would I notice a drastic difference with the high fat powder? Would it be worth getting a bag of both? Or just one over the other? I have a bag of powder from Luker Cacao, and have yet to open it, like I said, I just dont use it much. Anyways, I saw these bags and wanted to inquire before making a purchase.

Cocoa Powder.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

High fat simply means it has a higher % of cocoa butter left in it. When I bake, say, a cake with the higher fat cocoa butter, the cake seems moister, but this could just be my imagination!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm pretty sure 22/24 means 22-24% cocoa butter still remaining in the cocoa powder. 10/12 means 10-12% ccb in the cocoa powder.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, I do understand that, ive just never used the product. I suppose qhat I was wondering is, if you tasted the powders side by side, would you notice a difference? Or like what keychris said, does it make the most difference when its added to a baked item? Id just be using it as a dusting powder, and from words on each package, there doesnt seems to be a difference in color. Ill probably end up getting a bag of the high fat the next time I'm in, I just wanted to ask first.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Heres the latest from my kitchen:

 

I got some sample boxes, I like the black ones with the raised pattern on them. So I ordered two sizes, one for 6 pc, and another for 12 pc. The company sent me double of my order, and told me to keep them, so I did. I initially thought it was odd when I had so many packages on my door step. Anyways, pictured in the box are enrobed chipotle caramels with smoked salt.

 

Next are enrobed coffee caramels, then banana taffies, some more molds I had gotton off of ebay from a seller getting rid of a ton of them, most in very good condition. So I just make some bonbons, the centers are a raspberry chipotle butter ganache. Then we have almonds panned in milk chocolate, and finally blueberries panned with white chocolate.

2015-05-26 14.41.24.jpg

2015-05-26 14.44.36.jpg

2015-05-26 14.51.14.jpg

2015-06-03 14.07.22.jpg

2015-06-11 12.01.47.jpg

2015-06-25 15.45.31-1.jpg

  • Like 12

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yeah, I do understand that, ive just never used the product. I suppose qhat I was wondering is, if you tasted the powders side by side, would you notice a difference? Or like what keychris said, does it make the most difference when its added to a baked item? Id just be using it as a dusting powder, and from words on each package, there doesnt seems to be a difference in color. Ill probably end up getting a bag of the high fat the next time I'm in, I just wanted to ask first.

 

I use the Cacao Barry version of the 22/24 it's much nicer and strong then any I've used. That is my opinion. If you want to sweeten it a bit just mix with a little icing sugar.

Great hot cacao recipe with the 22/24 is 1 part cacao / 2 parts sugar a nd a little vanilla beans in the jar to enhance the mix.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I use the Cacao Barry version of the 22/24 it's much nicer and strong then any I've used. That is my opinion. If you want to sweeten it a bit just mix with a little icing sugar.

Great hot cacao recipe with the 22/24 is 1 part cacao / 2 parts sugar a nd a little vanilla beans in the jar to enhance the mix.

Ok, thanks for that! I ended up not purchasing the Callebaut powder. I already had purchased a bag of cocoa powder from Luker Cacao, and when I looked at it I realized it actually was high fat. I dont use cocoa powder for too much, so I dont want to start hoarding it haha. And cool tip actually, about the recipe for hot cocoa, I never thought to store the vanilla bean in a cocoa mix, I'd totally be down for that, sounds a lot more interesting them just storing it in sugar.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not being much of a maker of confections, I don't often post in this forum, though I do lurk to admire others' works of art. But my daughter, the Pinterest queen, found a "pin" for Rice Krispy Treat "starfish" she wanted me to make for my grandson's "beach party" birthday.

 

One makes the standard Rice Krispy treat, rolled out thinner than common on a cookie sheet, and cuts into star shapes. Then one frosts them (I used a commercially prepared caramel frosting), and dips in graham cracker crumbs, pressing to be certain the crumbs completely cover and adhere to the frosting. Then one puts "eyes" (little candy buttons) on them.

 

Wish I had a photo of the finished product. They were kinda cute. And I got to eat the trimmings.

 

starfish.JPG

 

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those are cute, Kay!  

 

I've never been able to make rice krispy treats.  They always come out SUPER tough.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Made dark chocolate Bon bons with a coffee ganache. Forgot to take a photo of the centre...

image.jpg

  • Like 6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I redid the photography for my last 2 chocolates...

 

Popping Feeling...
milk + dark chocolate ganache & lavender & lemon jenever, hazelnut praliné & milk chocolate & popping candy, dipped milk chocolate
 
Coffee...
milk chocolate ganache & grinded coffee, dipped milk chocolate
 

 

026. Popping Feeling.jpg

027. Coffee.jpg

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.

  • Similar Content

    • By curls
      So, what is everyone doing for the pastry & baking side of Easter?
       
      I'm working on the following chocolates: fruit & nut eggs, hollow bunnies, Jelly Belly filled bunnies, coconut bunnies, dragons (filled with rice krispies & chocolate), peanut butter hedgehogs, and malted milk hens. Hoping to finish my dark chocolate production today and get started on all my milk chocolate items.
       
      My father-in-law will be baking the traditional family Easter bread a day or two before Easter. Its an enriched bread and he makes two versions -- one with raisins and one without (I prefer the one with raisins).
       

       
      And I was lucky enough to spot this couple in the sale moulds stock at last year's eGullet chocolate & confections workshop in Niagara-on-the-Lake, Ontario. These love bunnies help so very much with Easter chocolate production!  ;-)

    • By Jim D.
      I have an opportunity to obtain (without a trip to NYC, where everything appears available) some hard-to-find liqueurs or brandies for my chocolate work, primarily in ganaches. I already have a poire Williams eau-de-vie and a framboise one as well. I have German kirschwasser but am getting low on that, so am thinking of getting more while I have this chance. For new ones, I'm thinking primarily of apricot. I have heard there are some wonderful European apricot brandies/liqueurs, but don't know which really taste of apricots and are worth purchasing. And the other flavor I would like is a strawberry brandy or liqueur. Online I've found Dolceterra Marcati wild strawberries liqueur and Drillaut strawberry liqueur but know nothing about either. I lean more toward a liqueur/cordial than eau-de-vie because sometimes I think the latter does not always taste specifically of the fruit.
       
      Any guidance would be much appreciated, including ideas for fruits I haven't mentioned.
    • By chows
      I've recently started making caramels and been experimenting with lots of flavors and having a blast. One thing that I am having a hard time finding information about is the role of the different ingredients and how different ratios affect the firmness of a caramel. In particular, I have an espresso caramel recipe that I can't seem to get to the soft, no-effort-while-chewing texture that I've achieved with other flavors, yet I've stuck to the same temperatures as other recipes. This leads me to believe that the ratio of ingredients is key. I was hoping I'd be able to get some insight into how to alter ingredient ratios to produce a softer caramel. 
       
      Any help would be appreciated.
    • By melmck
      I am searching for a natural source of food colorings, to tint buttercream, & use in chocolate work. I don't like commercial FC, it is synthetic and toxic to boot. Has anyone found a good source/vendor who has naturally derived colorings
    • By Pastrypastmidnight
      Does anyone have a chewy chocolate caramel recipe they love? One that holds its shape but can be cut on a guitar? The recipes I’ve tried have either been not very chocolate-y or suuuuuuuper stiff. Like, I bruised the palm of my hand cutting them stiff :(. 
       
      Or or even if you can just point me in the direction of some theory, that would be great!
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×