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Dinner! 2014 (Part 4)

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Last night. 

 

Spicy braised beef with chickpeas and carrots. There is a bit of chilli, some thyme and a tiny bit of tomato in there. Served with minted couscous. I would have done it with lamb, but lamb is hard to find here. Occasionally, it turns up for about a week then disappears until next year.

 

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Daikon & minced pork  ball soup in pork bone soup.  Chopped scallions.

 

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Somewhat milky pork stock was made by gently boiling pork knuckle bones & etc in water (replenished as needed) with some sea salt for a total of somewhere around 8-10 hours (I lost track).  Some sliced ginger went in halfway through. The bones had some residual meat and were given the fei sui treatment before starting the stock proper.  A portion of the stock (most of the floating fat removed) was diluted down w/ water (round about 3 volumes) and the soup w/ sliced daikon & pork meatballs made.  The minced pork (from the Chinese grocery; nicely fatty) was mixed w/ finely chopped scallions, black sesame oil, generous ground white pepper, a bit of light soy sauce (sang chau) [Kimlan] and fish sauce [Red Boat] and left alone (while the daikon was simmering in the soup) before "scooping & patting" with a tablespoon into approximate "balls" (more blobs than balls, I suppose :-) ) and adding to the soup shortly before completion.

 

There are threads here on eG relating to creating and using milky stocks, readers unfamiliar with them might like to search for and consult them.

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Chuck tender SV'd for 12 hours at 54.5 C, steamed broccoli, sauteed Portobello.

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Our dinner today was Kori Ghasi with rice cracker, I got the recipe from an Indian friend and it was as always lovely and hot.

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Got it - it was the browning in particular that threw me.  160F is like 77C, which is close to sous vide, but without the vide.  Do you know what it was roasted in?  What oven holds that temp?

 

More details: the roast sat on a low cookie-type rack set in a large shallow pan (edges about 1 inch tall). The oven was a cheap GE model; it goes down to 170F but the actual temp inside as measured by oven thermometer was closer to 160F.

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Dinner last night :

 

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this is TJ's Organic Spaghetti  ...  I didnt care for it .  its a bit bland if that  it goes back

 

w Home Aged Tomat's   ( 'on the vine' aged in a paper bag w apples ... just pic the ripest there

 

w no blemish nor buses and watch each day.  take off the 'stem' )

 

home grown basil and home ' water-potted ' green onions, garlic, TJ's Kalamata OO, and

 

Tj's  'Parmesan- ish' and Garlic Toast w HomeMade ( machine ) bread.

 

did I mention the Carafe of Methode Rotuts  Bubbly ?

 

delicious.


Edited by rotuts (log)
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More details: the roast sat on a low cookie-type rack set in a large shallow pan (edges about 1 inch tall). The oven was a cheap GE model; it goes down to 170F but the actual temp inside as measured by oven thermometer was closer to 160F.

 

Thanks.

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Hen House Market had Lobster tails on sale yesterday for $5.00 each and strip steaks for $6.00 each. I made dinner around those today. The lobster was served with Buerre Monte and a cream sauce loosely based on the one used with Lobster à l'américaine.  The steak was grilled outside. The lobster was cooked first in a skillet with a little oil until the shell turned red, then finished in the oven.

I got some BBQ sauce that won first place at the American Royal BBQ contest in 2012. I had some of that on the steak to see how I liked it, and we had smashed potatoes with sour cream.

The salad was made with lettuce, garden tomatoes, radishes, carrots, green onions and some leftover chicken salad.

 

 

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Edited by Norm Matthews (log)
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Chicken paprikash, acorn squash, dunking bread.

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Smoked Wings tonight using several of the Dizzy Pig rubs. Half with Dizzy Pig Bombay Curry-ish rub and the other hall with a combo of Swamp Venom and Tsunami Spin. Smoked then finished on the grill Served with green beans panned in butter, sliced almonds and pecans with a shake of Pineapple Head rub, salt and pepper

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Scoobie, how long did you smoke the wings please?

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"  Chicken paprikash "

 

AnnaN : What's your Rx ?

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"  Chicken paprikash "

 

AnnaN : What's your Rx ?

It is from Food 52. Very simple. I did not make the dumplings.

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Norm, what a beautiful, luscious looking meal!  I'm yearning for surf and turf now.

 

Lightly breaded boneless chicken thighs in a creamy mushroom (not from a can) sauce over white rice, green beans from my m-i-law's garden and 'maters from ours.

 

 

 

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Thank you Shelby. The lobster tails were too small to make a meal with one each so when I saw the steak on sale too I knew what dinner was going to be. I also got some pumpernickel bagels but forgot to put them on the table...

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Thanks, it's really simple.  Caramelize five large vidalia onions in 2 T of butter, 1/4 cup olive oil, 2 cloves of garlic, 2 bay leaves, 1/2 t thyme and S&P to taste. The crust is a pate brisee  using 2 1/3 cup flour, 1/2 cup butter, 1/2 cup lard, 1/4 - 1/2 cup ice water and maybe  1 t of salt.  The crust was enough for an 8" tart, two 4" tarts and a 4" x 12" tart.  I had a pretty good size piece of Piave cheese that I substituted for parmesan, maybe 1 cup.  I think I used about 4-5 tomatoes of varying sizes.   To assemble put a layer of grated cheese in each crust, followed by onions, tomatoes, a little more of the onions, oil cured olives and more cheese.  Bake at 425 till the the cheese is browned and the filling bubbling.  Hope you enjoy.

Do you just mean a "sweet" onion?  I've never seen Vidalias this late in the year.

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I'd had a small package (<half a pound) of sweetbreads in the freezer for a while and couldn't decide what to do with. My one other attempt was a few years ago, involved all that weighing down and I wasn't impressed. Can't remember what I did with them that time. But having had them in a restaurant recently, I was determined. I generally find Saveur recipes reliable and this was better than that. Very straightforward and very, very good! We kept toasting ourselves over HOW good. If we'd had this in a favored restaurant,we'd have been wowed. Here's the recipe and a pic:


http://www.saveur.com/article/Recipes..


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meals from the past couple nights.   

 

 

keralan fish curry, steelhead trout. 

 

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Pork chop  and baked potato tonight. 

 

 

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Nothing like a good meat glue supper.  I bought a pack of bacon "ends and pieces" to season baked beans yesterday and decided to bond some of the pieces to chicken thighs.  After I deboned the thighs I cut them in half lengthwise to separate the two main muscles.  I then used some chicken skin  trimmings or bacon pieces dusted with transglutaminase and bonded to the non-skin side. 

 

There was a lot of nice meaty pieces of pork with the right shape to bond.

 

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Getting ready to dust.

 

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Post dusting

 

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Vacuum bagged and left in the refrigerator overnight.  Each piece is individually wrapped and then packed pretty tightly to give the meat a uniform cross section.  

 

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Grilled with various vegetables.  Tasty dish that was not as complicated as it may sound.  

 

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My wrapping skills need work. Rice paper rolls with lettuce, Korean barbecued chicken and avocado. I do not like avocado but a minor dietary issue arose recently and so I am doing my best to choke it down. Thought the very highly seasoned chicken would help disguise it. Wrong!

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My wrapping skills need work. Rice paper rolls with lettuce, Korean barbecued chicken and avocado. I do not like avocado but a minor dietary issue arose recently and so I am doing my best to choke it down. Thought the very highly seasoned chicken would help disguise it. Wrong!

If not prying, what does avocado add that something else wouldn't?  They look great!

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This is Our MIDWEST summer!!  BLT/Corn/Melon

 

Weird Capsian pink  maters..  meaty but not sharp in the flavor profile

 

 

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If not prying, what does avocado add that something else wouldn't?  They look great!

Nothing at all. Just a matter of degree. And I believe in trying to come around to liking some things that I think I hate.

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Italian slow pork ragu with pasta.  Well  the 10 hours  it said it needed wasn't right, it only need 3 and then it was perfect, letting go the full time was a mistake, because it became over cooked and watery. I will make it again and only cook it 3 hours.

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