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eatingwitheddie

Dipping Sauces for Eggrolls

28 posts in this topic

In a post on the hoisin thread Anna N asks for some ideas for dipping sauces for egg rolls.

Any thoughts?

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A mixture of duck sauce and hot mustard, about half and half.

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Some simple-to-do ideas:

1) Colman's (English style) mustard. Mix some water into the mustard powder, that's all.

2) Dry - no sauce - just a real tasty filling - my own preference

3) A good hot sauce straight from the bottle: try Sriracha for this purpose (not oily)

4) A soy based dip: 3T kikkoman, 2T water, 2t sugar, 1t vinegar, a little minced garlic and ginger and scallion, a dash of sesame oil; hot sauce (if you like, to taste)

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a small saucer or soy sauce with a dab of karashi (Japanese hot mustard) on the side.

Dip in the karashi, then the soy, take a bite and repeat.


<p><strong>Kristin Wagner</strong>, aka "torakris"

Manager, Membership

<a class="bbc_email" href="mailto:kwagner@egstaff.org" title="E-mail Link">kwagner@egstaff.org</a></p>

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A mixture of duck sauce and hot mustard, about half and half.

Sorry I've never heard of duck sauce. Is it a condiment available in jars like plum sauce? Thanks


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Never call a stomach a tummy without good reason.” William Strunk Jr., The Elements of Style

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Some simple-to-do ideas:

1) Colman's (English style) mustard. Mix some water into the mustard powder, that's all.

2) Dry - no sauce - just a real tasty filling - my own preference

3) A good hot sauce straight from the bottle: try Sriracha for this purpose (not oily)

4) A soy based dip: 3T kikkoman, 2T water, 2t sugar, 1t vinegar, a little minced garlic and ginger and scallion, a dash of sesame oil; hot sauce (if you like, to taste)

Thanks. I too prefer them sauceless but a sauce seems to be expected - perhaps because there's not much taste to take-out egg rolls themselves.

I have Sriracha in the fridge and can soon whip up the soy-based dip.

Thanks for your answers.


Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Never call a stomach a tummy without good reason.” William Strunk Jr., The Elements of Style

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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A mixture of duck sauce and hot mustard, about half and half.

Sorry I've never heard of duck sauce. Is it a condiment available in jars like plum sauce? Thanks

I think you can buy it in jars, but I don't know how good it will be. It's a thick, sweet sauce, a little citrusy. Usually a dark, orangy color. Chutney-like.

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A mixture of duck sauce and hot mustard, about half and half.

Sorry I've never heard of duck sauce. Is it a condiment available in jars like plum sauce? Thanks

Probably Duck Sauce and what you call Plum Sauce are the same thing. Duck Sauce is a sweet dipping sauce made from diluted apricot jam or cooked apricots and flavorings. You typically get a package of it with an order of egg rolls. Some people call it plum sauce, though some people also call hoisin plum sauce. Because of this 'plum sauce' is a misused, and to my mind, an improper and confusing term. Plus neither sauce contains plums.

By the way, many Americans regard duck sauce as an Americanized part of Chinese food. In fact on more than one occasion I have had roast duck and goose in Hong Kong and it was served with duck sauce (among others).

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Do you mean that Hoisin sauce is sometimes called plum sauce (my understanding was that plum sauce (which I usually get with moo shoo) was just hoisin)?

In SF, they give a thin, bright, neon red sauce with egg rolls (if they give anything -- oddly, they usually don't give a dipping sauce with potstickers, although they make excellent potstickers out here).

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I have found a few different kind of rolls (spring,egg,shrimp) prepared differently (steamed,fried) and the dipping sauces offered varied - SG/HK/TW/TH/MY all have different take on it. All interesting and delicious.


anil

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I like just dipping them into a bowl of gomasio (sesame salt). Most of the dipping sauces I use have a high acid profile from lime or rice vinegar along with some form of heat from chiles, ginger and so on. I don't care for thick sauces with egg rolls/spring rolls. Often just some shoyu and mustard.


"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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OK, I'm going to expose myself as a complete tourist (an American one at that) and say that for eggrolls (as opposed to spring rolls) I like the bright orange sweet and sour sauce found in bad chinese restaurants. I know, I know, it's disgusting, but I get cravings for the stuff.

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What's the orange stuff? Isn't that duck sauce ("plum" sauce)?


"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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Oh.


"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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Japanese hot mustard, YES! :biggrin:


Marlene

cookskorner

Practice. Do it over. Get it right.

Mostly, I want people to be as happy eating my food as I am cooking it.

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Normally nothing too but for a while there I was addicted to dipping just about everything into a mix of lo-so soy, sriracha to taste, lemon to taste, some finely chopped green onion and finely chopped cilantro. Drove my mom crazy - she considered it an insult.

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Really, lou? Sounds good.


"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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What's the orange stuff? Isn't that duck sauce ("plum" sauce)?

Actually, more like this:

sweetandsoursauce.jpg

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NSM, what are the dark, frog egg bits?


"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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NSM, what are the dark, frog egg bits?

I'm not really sure (they creep me out, too). Maybe pineapple, garlic or ginger bits? The brand I buy, Sun Luck "Restaurant Style" Sweet & Sour Sauce doesn't have them - just a uniform orange goo. Ingredients are basically sugar, water, vinegar, ketchup, modified food starch and soy sauce.

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Mebbe they just gestate over time then.


"I've caught you Richardson, stuffing spit-backs in your vile maw. 'Let tomorrow's omelets go empty,' is that your fucking attitude?" -E. B. Farnum

"Behold, I teach you the ubermunch. The ubermunch is the meaning of the earth. Let your will say: the ubermunch shall be the meaning of the earth!" -Fritzy N.

"It's okay to like celery more than yogurt, but it's not okay to think that batter is yogurt."

Serving fine and fresh gratuitous comments since Oct 5 2001, 09:53 PM

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Mebbe they just gestate over time then.

That would explain why it says "Refrigerate after opening". Don't want them to hatch too soon.

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Really, lou? Sounds good.

No - my mom crazy was a bad thing. :biggrin:

But yes, to the dipping sauce - I was addicted to the stuff. I'd just started working in one of our Vietnamese-Chinese restaurants and for the first time loved cilantro and those flavour combos were what all the cooks added to their own bowls during staff meals.

And that pinky goo reminds me of the time when at our chop suey restaurant someone accidentally mistook the egg roll sauce for iced tea. A customer drank a whole tall iced glass full. Said it was the best iced tea he'd ever had. :blink:

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