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liuzhou

China Shopping

99 posts in this topic

it's great fun to go shopping with you! Is there a condiment/pickle type area? Curious to see that. 

 

How many varieties of mango do you get? 

 

Would this store be considered pricey or upscale? 

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Is there a condiment/pickle type area? Curious to see that.

How many varieties of mango do you get?

Would this store be considered pricey or upscale?

 

 

There isn't a pickle area, no. They tend to be more usual in the farmers' markets or even more commonly just on street stalls. I'll post about them later. In the meantime here is a street pickle vendor about ten minutes walk from my home.

 

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There are usually four or five mango types, but don't ask me what they are. My only mango expertise is in eating them.

 

This supermarket is not particularly pricey or upscale. About average. They are just better at doing their job than some of the others and carry a wider range.Also, their stuff is just a notch higher in quality.


Edited by liuzhou typo (log)
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There isn't a pickle area, no. They tend to be more usual in the farmers' markets or even more commonly just on street stalls. I'll post about them later. In the meantime here is a street pickle vendor about ten minutes walk from my home. 

 

I  really want to know what is in each of those containers! Looks lovely. Can't wait to hear more on this topic and others. Thank you for sharing! 


Edited by FauxPas (log)

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That pizza looks....interesting. Is that (gulp) mayo on top?

 

Probably. I am certainly not volunteering to find out for sure.  

 

They seem to think all western food is covered in sweet Japanese mayo or overpowering black pepper sauce.


Edited by liuzhou (log)
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-------------------------- eaten them and smelled them.  Nothing like durian.

 

That can be because a new popular variety "Golden Pillow durian" from Thailand is not very smelly.

 

https://www.google.com/search?q=%E9%87%91%E6%9E%95%E5%A4%B4%E6%A6%B4%E8%8E%B2&safe=off&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=d2W9U6OrCoKtyATpsIDwBA&ved=0CCQQsAQ&biw=768&bih=436&dpr=2.5

 

dcarch


Edited by dcarch (log)

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That can be because a new popular variety "Golden Pillow durian" from Thailand is not very smelly.

https://www.google.c...bih=436&dpr=2.5

dcarch

 

There is a difference between 'not very smelly' and 'completely different smell'.

I now intend to continue with the thread. This has become so tedious.

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Here are some historic photos of my local market. Actually, it's not my nearest market, but I usually go to this one. It was my nearest 15 years ago and I know many of the vendors so I go back. It closed for a while and was temporarily rehoused while they rebuilt the old one, so what looks like two different places is actually the same one.

 

Before you get to the market proper there is usually a bunch of unlicensed  traders on the approaches. They occasionally get swept away but soon reappear.

 

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The faces and, to some extent, produce are different but the layout is very much like what I used to see in Egypt on their market days. How do these vendors and buyers feel about being photographed? Do some of them grant permission and then try to demand money afterward?

How is the sanitation in terms of food safety and parasites? Do you have to take special precautions to clean greens or fruit that you don't peel?

Are those bananas or plantains in that picture? They look shorter and yellower than what I'm used to seeing, but that may be my inexperience. My friends who've lived in banana country won't touch the stuff we get in the USA because it's so underripe.


Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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How do these vendors and buyers feel about being photographed? Do some of them grant permission and then try to demand money afterward?

 

They are pretty relaxed about it. They certainly wouldn't demand money. They seem more amused than anything else.

 

Quote

 

How is the sanitation in terms of food safety and parasites? Do you have to take special precautions to clean greens or fruit that you don't peel?

 

I never buy from these unlicensed traders. I'm not saying their stuff is bad, but it is unchecked. The licensed traders inside the market proper are checked fairly regularly, especially before holidays and festivals, all of  which are celebrated by eating till you drop.. 

 

Any vegetables and fruit, no matter where you buy them need careful and thorough cleaning. China still relies extensively on 'night soil" as a fertiliser., This is human excrement gathered from public conveniences, local schools and colleges factories etc. Full marks for recycling, but...

 

There is also an over-reliance of chemical fertilisers in recent years.

Chinese people never eat the skin on fruit. Most people, including me, carry little knifes just to peel an unexpected apple or pear.

 

Quote

 

Are those bananas or plantains in that picture?

 

Bananas. In the USA and UK we tend to only get Cavendish bananas (we also get them here) . In SE Asia there are many varieties, I don't know the names in English.

 


Edited by liuzhou formatting and a typo. nothing interesting (log)
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Any vegetables and fruit, no matter where you buy them need careful and thorough cleaning. China still relies extensively on 'night soil" as a fertiliser., This is human excrement gathered from public conveniences, local schools and colleges factories etc. Full marks for recycling, but...

 

 

 

Ditto in the Philippines.  At least that's how it was when we lived there.  We soaked all fruits and vegetables bought from the local markets in a solution of 1/4 C chlorine bleach to 1 gal bottled water.

 

And, although I hesitate to ask (for obvious reasons), I can't help myself...  That pink fruit in the foreground of the photo with the grapes and the woman kneeling looks like what Mexicans call "tuna."  Is that what it is?

 

And, if it is, what all do they do with it?  Jams, jellies?  Probably not Tuna Margaritas, but any beverages?


Edited by Jaymes (log)

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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That pink fruit in the foreground of the photo with the grapes and the woman kneeling looks like what Mexicans call "tuna." Is that what it is?

And, if it is, what all do they do with it? Jams, jellies?

 

Yes. Dragon fruit. Pretty but rather tasteless, yet I like it. Sort of refreshing.

 

It is mostly eaten as a table fruit or in fruit salads. 


Edited by liuzhou (log)

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wonderful thread.  just wonderful.  many thanks.

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wonderful thread. just wonderful. many thanks.

 

Thank you. I'm so glad you enjoy. I was nervous posting it in the beginning. I wasn't sure anyone would be interested.

Unfortunately, I had to waste time tonight (technically this morning) fixing the image problem or I would have posted some more, but it's 2 am here in very hot southern China so I'm off to bed.. 

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Yes. Dragon fruit. Pretty but rather tasteless, yet I like it. Sort of refreshing.

 

It is mostly eaten as a table fruit or in fruit salads. 

 

It has the same texture as kiwi fruit, tastes like kiwi, kind of, one part kiwi mixed with 6 parts water. :-)

 

The many times I have been to China, I don't remember seeing dragon fruit in the past. Could they be imported and not native?

 

dcarch

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The many times I have been to China, I don't remember seeing dragon fruit in the past. Could they be imported and not native?

 

No. They are locally grown. They are growing right outside my office window in a neighbouring peasant farmer's field. They are very, very common. 

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It has the same texture as kiwi fruit, tastes like kiwi, kind of, one part kiwi mixed with 6 parts water. :-)

 

The many times I have been to China, I don't remember seeing dragon fruit in the past. Could they be imported and not native?

 

dcarch

 

As it does indeed appear to be the fruit of a cactus, and Liuzhou mentions he is in "very hot southern China," perhaps it doesn't grow as much in the regions of China where you have visited?


Edited by Jaymes (log)

I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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Liuzhou, your concern was for naught.  This has been a fascinating thread and I've enjoyed it so much.  Thanks for doing it and I hope there is still more to come...


Darienne

learn, learn, learn...

Cheers & Chocolates

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No. They are locally grown. They are growing right outside my office window in a neighbouring peasant farmer's field. They are very, very common. 

 

I meant originally. For instance, Kiwi fruit is native in China, now is grown everywhere.

 

Speaking of bananas, I remember having seen red skinned bananas in China.

 

The picture above. The lady with the dragon fruits, behind the dragon fruits, those greenish ones, are those fresh dates?

 

dcarch

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A round of market pictures. These have all been taken over the last year or six. I will go at the weekend and take some newer ones.

 

Warning: This post contains some pictures which might not be everyone's cup of tea. Those of a sensitive nature  might want to scroll past.

 

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Pigeon

 

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Cooked Birds

 

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Meat

 

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Flour


Edited by liuzhou (log)
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Those attractive yellow squash flowers - how are they typically used in your area?

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Another way to buy food is, of course, from street vendors. They are usually selling stuff to be eaten immediately, but also a lot of fruit is sold on the streets. Here is a sample.

 

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Changsha Fermented Tofu - Stinky Tofu

 

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Flower Tofu - Tofu Dessert

 

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Grilled Iron Plate Squid

 

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Grilled Stuff on Sticks

 

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Fried Tofu Squares

 

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Papaya

 

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Papaya vendor peeling

 

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Wu Dalang Pancakes

 

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For many years, this man has arrived n the city every year around September. He is from the far west of China in Xinjiang. He is here to sell his wonderful dried grapes and nuts. Last year he didn't come, but sent his son instead.

 

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Son

 

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Their grapes

 

 

More to come

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