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Lia Tumkus

Pacojet sorbet

15 posts in this topic

Hi everybody!

 

Usually my ice-creams turn out pretty good in the pacojet, but sorbets always have a harder consistency to quenelle (due to the amount of water in the recipe), can someone share any secrets to make a more "pliable" sorbet, just something that I can quenelle perfectly?

 

The basic recipe I follow is:

 

350g fruit puree

550g water

80g sugar

80g liquid glucose

60g trimoline

10g stabiliser

 

Other pacojet recipes are more than welcome! I know pacojet have recipes in their website, but the sorbet recipes turnout pretty similar to what I got.

 

Thanks for any inputs :)

 

Love,

 

Lia 

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I recommend getting a refractometer. (I got one on eBay cheaply, look for one that reads from about 15-45, at least) Different fruit purees have differing brix levels, you may need to adjust your level of sweeteners. For the finished, unfrozen product: 27 is the ideal number, 30 and over will initially have a nice texture, but you'll get pools of syrupy stuff within a few hours. Under 26 and you get grainier texture and larger crystals.

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For sorbet I use 2 parts puree 1 part simple syrup. 1/2 sugar 1/2 water 

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I second the refractometer. Once you get one you'll wonder why you didnt go for it sooner!

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I think you'll be happy with this:

 

110 g Powdered Glucose

240 g Sugar

18 g Stabilizer

455 g Water

1000 g Puree

 

Whisk together the dry ingredients. Add the water and boil. Remove from heat & add puree with buerre mixer. Works for regular ice cream machine as well.


Always speak your mind. Those who mind don't matter and those who matter won't mind.

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Thanks for the refractometer idea Lisa Shock and minas6907, I'll look into that, I never actually use one, but I guess is time for me to do it :) thanks for the ideal numbers Lisa, I wouldn't know where to start.

Thanks for your recipe pjm333! So simple, so easy!

Thanks Drewman, I'll definitely order some powdered glucose ASAP and I'll give your recipe a go as well :)

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Update: Drewman your sorbet recipe worked incredibly well! I'm super happy with that! But I'm definitely buying a refractometer for the future! Thanks again!

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when you say "stabiliser" what is it?? i mean whats the name of the product???


i cook, i sleep, i ride.

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formula400 when I say stabilizer I mean ice cream stabilizer, I guess any brand will do. The one I use is a powder that prevents ice cristals to form.

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It makes sense to use a stabilizer designed specifically for sorbets. Some stabilizing ingredients (like kappa carrageenan) react with calcium, so they'll give a very different result in a dairy formula than a non-dairy one.

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Good point paulraphael I'm definitely using the one specialized for sorbets, it never occur to me why they make that difference... Thanks for the heads up mgaretz!

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The other difference is that a lot of ice cream blends contain emulsifiers ... sometimes lots of mono- and di-glycerides, especially if they're intended for egg-free ice creams. These won't hurt anything, but sorbets don't need emulsifying.

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Awesome! I never had much knowledge on sorbets! Great stuff! Thanks for sharing paulraphael :)

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