• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Lia Tumkus

Pacojet sorbet

15 posts in this topic

Hi everybody!

 

Usually my ice-creams turn out pretty good in the pacojet, but sorbets always have a harder consistency to quenelle (due to the amount of water in the recipe), can someone share any secrets to make a more "pliable" sorbet, just something that I can quenelle perfectly?

 

The basic recipe I follow is:

 

350g fruit puree

550g water

80g sugar

80g liquid glucose

60g trimoline

10g stabiliser

 

Other pacojet recipes are more than welcome! I know pacojet have recipes in their website, but the sorbet recipes turnout pretty similar to what I got.

 

Thanks for any inputs :)

 

Love,

 

Lia 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I recommend getting a refractometer. (I got one on eBay cheaply, look for one that reads from about 15-45, at least) Different fruit purees have differing brix levels, you may need to adjust your level of sweeteners. For the finished, unfrozen product: 27 is the ideal number, 30 and over will initially have a nice texture, but you'll get pools of syrupy stuff within a few hours. Under 26 and you get grainier texture and larger crystals.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For sorbet I use 2 parts puree 1 part simple syrup. 1/2 sugar 1/2 water 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I second the refractometer. Once you get one you'll wonder why you didnt go for it sooner!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think you'll be happy with this:

 

110 g Powdered Glucose

240 g Sugar

18 g Stabilizer

455 g Water

1000 g Puree

 

Whisk together the dry ingredients. Add the water and boil. Remove from heat & add puree with buerre mixer. Works for regular ice cream machine as well.


Always speak your mind. Those who mind don't matter and those who matter won't mind.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the refractometer idea Lisa Shock and minas6907, I'll look into that, I never actually use one, but I guess is time for me to do it :) thanks for the ideal numbers Lisa, I wouldn't know where to start.

Thanks for your recipe pjm333! So simple, so easy!

Thanks Drewman, I'll definitely order some powdered glucose ASAP and I'll give your recipe a go as well :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Update: Drewman your sorbet recipe worked incredibly well! I'm super happy with that! But I'm definitely buying a refractometer for the future! Thanks again!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

when you say "stabiliser" what is it?? i mean whats the name of the product???


i cook, i sleep, i ride.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

formula400 when I say stabilizer I mean ice cream stabilizer, I guess any brand will do. The one I use is a powder that prevents ice cristals to form.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It makes sense to use a stabilizer designed specifically for sorbets. Some stabilizing ingredients (like kappa carrageenan) react with calcium, so they'll give a very different result in a dairy formula than a non-dairy one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good point paulraphael I'm definitely using the one specialized for sorbets, it never occur to me why they make that difference... Thanks for the heads up mgaretz!

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The other difference is that a lot of ice cream blends contain emulsifiers ... sometimes lots of mono- and di-glycerides, especially if they're intended for egg-free ice creams. These won't hurt anything, but sorbets don't need emulsifying.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Awesome! I never had much knowledge on sorbets! Great stuff! Thanks for sharing paulraphael :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • By elinicka81
      Hi everyone!
      My name is Elitsa and I'd just joined the forum. I found it
      incredible place to meet people with similar interests.
      I love cooking, especially I love the desserts.
       
    • By ltjazz
      Hey all,
       
      I've made thicker and creamier sorbets with 25% to 35% sugar strained fruit purees and sugar, syrups, and other stabilizers that have worked well. However, because it's so much fruit and little to no water it can be an expensive project.
       
      I am trying to make "Water Ice" or "Italian Ice" in my home ice cream machine. Think of textures similar to Rita's Water Ice, Court Pastry Shop, or Miko's in Chicago. It eats much lighter than a sorbet but isn't really icy, but it's also not thick like sorbet. Ritas uses "flavoring" and sugar, while the other two use fruit juice. I'm thinking of thinning the strained fruit juice with water and adding a stabilizer, but I'm having trouble getting this in my home ice cream machine without it freezing solid like granita.
       
      Can anyone suggest a way to use real fruit juice, water, and a combination and concentration of stabilizers to get a looser, frozen fruit dessert that isn't icy?
    • By Lam
      So I've been looking for the ultimate matcha brownies (technically blondies but it just doesn't have the same ring to it). I've made chewy and fudgy regular brownies, but I find white chocolate based blondies to be much trickier. I have made a few matcha brownie recipes in the past, but they all came out sad and cakey. So I have taken it upon myself to come up with my own recipe. My matcha brownies came out very moist and "fudgy" but not chewy. I'm thinking next time I should try using vegetable oil instead of butter and only dark brown sugar. 


    • By Mette
      I've searched high and low for a recipe for lemon mousse, firm enough to make little 'eggs' to go on a dessert plate. Ideally, it should not be based on lemon curd or lemon cream, but just plain old lemons.
      Also, please throw me the best chocolate mousse recipe EVER - I'm in a mousse phase....
      Thanks in advance.
    • By B Edulis
      Once again, I tried to recreate my mother's shortbread cookies, using her recipe, and they didn't turn out. They were so crumbly they fell apart when you picked them up. I'm very attached to this particular recipe -- she told me that she got it from the first boy who ever kissed her, whose Scottish mother was renowned for them. That's one way to get a recipe!) She made them at all holidays. Here the recipe:
      1 cup of butter
      1/2 cup of sugar
      2 cups of flour
      pinch salt
      I've been creaming the butter and suger and adding the flour, chilling it and rolling it out and baking them at about 300 degrees. They spread more than hers did and they're just way crumbly. The taste is good, though.
      I wish I could as her for advice, but she's no longer with us -- can anyone help me?
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.