• Welcome to the eG Forums, a service of the eGullet Society for Culinary Arts & Letters. The Society is a 501(c)3 not-for-profit organization dedicated to the advancement of the culinary arts. These advertising-free forums are provided free of charge through donations from Society members. Anyone may read the forums, but to post you must create an account.

Lia Tumkus

Pacojet sorbet

15 posts in this topic

Hi everybody!

 

Usually my ice-creams turn out pretty good in the pacojet, but sorbets always have a harder consistency to quenelle (due to the amount of water in the recipe), can someone share any secrets to make a more "pliable" sorbet, just something that I can quenelle perfectly?

 

The basic recipe I follow is:

 

350g fruit puree

550g water

80g sugar

80g liquid glucose

60g trimoline

10g stabiliser

 

Other pacojet recipes are more than welcome! I know pacojet have recipes in their website, but the sorbet recipes turnout pretty similar to what I got.

 

Thanks for any inputs :)

 

Love,

 

Lia 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I recommend getting a refractometer. (I got one on eBay cheaply, look for one that reads from about 15-45, at least) Different fruit purees have differing brix levels, you may need to adjust your level of sweeteners. For the finished, unfrozen product: 27 is the ideal number, 30 and over will initially have a nice texture, but you'll get pools of syrupy stuff within a few hours. Under 26 and you get grainier texture and larger crystals.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For sorbet I use 2 parts puree 1 part simple syrup. 1/2 sugar 1/2 water 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I second the refractometer. Once you get one you'll wonder why you didnt go for it sooner!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think you'll be happy with this:

 

110 g Powdered Glucose

240 g Sugar

18 g Stabilizer

455 g Water

1000 g Puree

 

Whisk together the dry ingredients. Add the water and boil. Remove from heat & add puree with buerre mixer. Works for regular ice cream machine as well.


Always speak your mind. Those who mind don't matter and those who matter won't mind.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the refractometer idea Lisa Shock and minas6907, I'll look into that, I never actually use one, but I guess is time for me to do it :) thanks for the ideal numbers Lisa, I wouldn't know where to start.

Thanks for your recipe pjm333! So simple, so easy!

Thanks Drewman, I'll definitely order some powdered glucose ASAP and I'll give your recipe a go as well :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Update: Drewman your sorbet recipe worked incredibly well! I'm super happy with that! But I'm definitely buying a refractometer for the future! Thanks again!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

when you say "stabiliser" what is it?? i mean whats the name of the product???


i cook, i sleep, i ride.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

formula400 when I say stabilizer I mean ice cream stabilizer, I guess any brand will do. The one I use is a powder that prevents ice cristals to form.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It makes sense to use a stabilizer designed specifically for sorbets. Some stabilizing ingredients (like kappa carrageenan) react with calcium, so they'll give a very different result in a dairy formula than a non-dairy one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good point paulraphael I'm definitely using the one specialized for sorbets, it never occur to me why they make that difference... Thanks for the heads up mgaretz!

1 person likes this

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The other difference is that a lot of ice cream blends contain emulsifiers ... sometimes lots of mono- and di-glycerides, especially if they're intended for egg-free ice creams. These won't hurt anything, but sorbets don't need emulsifying.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Awesome! I never had much knowledge on sorbets! Great stuff! Thanks for sharing paulraphael :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

  • Similar Content

    • Fondant ruffles
      By pastrygirl
      I've been requested to make a cake inspired by Prince circa the Purple Rain era - "a riot of purple" and white ruffles like the shirt he wore.  I have little experience with fondant, am planning to use marshmallow fondant (melted marshmallows + powdered sugar).  Does anyone have any tricks to making the ruffles perky and 3-D?  Should I drape them over something the day before and let them dry? I want them to add dimension. Thanks!
       
       
    • A Wolf, a Viking, and a French macaron walk into a bar...
      By pastrygirl
      I'm frustrated!  The restaurant kitchen has two gas convection ovens, a Wolf with a 6-burner top and a Viking with a French flat top top.  The Wolf has long been the pastry oven and I've baked approximately a zillion things in it, including a few thousand French macarons.  Unfortunately the Wolf has been out of commission and I'm left with the Viking.  The cream puffs, brownies, and shortbread have been baking fine, but I've had two batches of French macaron with really poor foot development and some cracking on top.  I made a batch today and gave at least a third of the shells to staff because of poor rise.  I don't think I rushed the drying, they seemed appropriately skinned-over before baking.  It's a nice sunny day and I've made plenty of macarons in the rain so I don't think it's the weather.  The Viking seems like a moister heat when I open the oven, is it possible that one make of oven would create a more humid heat, or have I simply lost my macaron mojo?  Help!
    • What went wrong with these cookies?
      By Nancy in Pátzcuaro
      Last night I made "Fudgy Chocolate-Walnut Cookies (flourless)" for a Seder dinner tonight. What emerged from the oven weren't cookies at all, but rather a crisp puddle with vaguely cookie-shaped broken pieces floating on it. Tastes wonderful, but looks pretty bad. No photos--too ugly.
       
      The recipe includes 9 oz. toasted walnuts chopped very fine in the food processor, 3 cups confectioner's sugar, 1/2 cup + 3 Tbs. Dutch process cocoa powder, 1/4 tsp. salt, 1 Tbs. vanilla, and 4  egg whites (unwhipped) . The instructions say to preheat the oven to 350 and bake for 20 minutes.
       
      My first thought is that the oven temperature is too high for anything with egg whites in it. Any other ideas? I will try this again at a lower temperature, but there's no time to do it today (plus I'm out of both walnuts and confectioner's sugar). I'll bring them tonight, but it's a little embarrassing to have to break this big dark brown cookie/cracker into uneven pieces to serve it.
       
      Any help you can give me would be greatly appreciated. Thanks--
       
      Nancy in Pátzcuaro
    • Rich pastry cream filling: I mean REALLY, REALLY rich
      By Darienne
      I well remember the first time I made DH a Boston Cream Pie.  And I thought he would be so happy.  I think I followed a Martha Stewart recipe.  
       
      But no.  He is the son of a French-Canadian cooking, baking, Mother and if you know anything about French-Canadian cooking, Sugar Pie is a regular feature.   And pure pork Tortiere.  DH grew up on Millefeuille and Napoleons and Rhubarb Pie which had so much sugar in it that you couldn't taste the rhubarb.  (Sorry, dear departed M-i-L.)  And so my cream filling simply wasn't rich enough.  Make it richer, he said, Like my Mother did. 

      And so I am asking.  Take your regular Creme Patisserie and add what to it to make it 'richer'?  Butter?   Several tablespoons?  I've Googled 'very rich pastry cream filling' and can't get back the usual egg, cream...and maybe a smidgen of butter...recipes.

      Help please.
    • Whipping creme anglaise
      By Droo
      I'm making the citron cream recipe in Migoya's Elements of Desserts (p318/9?).
      It says to cook the anglaise to 85 degrees, place on an ice bath then whip the anglaise. I've done that but it doesn't seem to whip (let alone to a medium peak).
       
      This is a new technique I've not tried before so I'm at a loss. Anyone have any ideas?
       
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.