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Cooking pork shank


boudin noir
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I plan on cooking pork shank on a rotissori. Should it be precooked beforehand?

Am I missing something: If you cook the pork shank first, why cook it again on the rotisserie?

 ... Shel


 

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I have the same question that Shel_B has. In addition, I'll note that pork shank (in my experience) generally wants long, slow low cooking - preferably in a moist environment. A braise is a good way to go, for example. I'm not sure that a rotisserie would give you that, although I'm no expert on the topic.

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
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"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

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I am concerned about it drying out if cooked fully on the rotisseri. But I want the crisp skin as they have it in Munich where at least it is finished on the rotisseri. Munich schweinhaxe is what i'm striving for. These are large 3lb. pork shanks.

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The last one I did was pre-cooked low and slow. I think I used the crockpot. Then I transferred it to my Weber grill to finish and add some smokiness and crisp the lovely skin. It was a bit fragile by the time I transferred it and would not have survived being placed on a spit. However, I set it widest end on the grate so that all the skin was exposed and it crisped well.

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The last one I did was pre-cooked low and slow. I think I used the crockpot. Then I transferred it to my Weber grill to finish and add some smokiness and crisp the lovely skin. It was a bit fragile by the time I transferred it and would not have survived being placed on a spit. However, I set it widest end on the grate so that all the skin was exposed and it crisped well.

I was trying hard to imagine how you would spit roast it after it has been pre-cooked and concluded as you point out that it would simply be too fragile. Further there is a mess of bones in there so I wonder how you would get the spit through. Perhaps boudin noir will be able to clarify. I googled Munich schweinhaxe and came up with a recipe for slow roasting followed by a blast in a really hot oven to crisp the skin. It looked and sounded so good I can't wait to get my hands on a couple of hocks.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

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I was trying hard to imagine how you would spit roast it after it has been pre-cooked and concluded as you point out that it would simply be too fragile. Further there is a mess of bones in there so I wonder how you would get the spit through. Perhaps boudin noir will be able to clarify. I googled Munich schweinhaxe and came up with a recipe for slow roasting followed by a blast in a really hot oven to crisp the skin. It looked and sounded so good I can't wait to get my hands on a couple of hocks.

I think you are right about the fragility following braising. I will spit them raw and rotisseri. The ones that I saw roasting on the spits in Munich did not look at all pre cooked.

Will report back if there is interest.

Thanks

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It does look good. I've had braised hocks before but never by spit-roasting. However, I found a blog post that says there are 2 ways to prepare Munich Schweinshaxe: either braised in sauerkraut, or seasoned and left to dry in the refrigerator to get that tight skin, then spit-roasted. This blogger chose the second method. The pictures include one of two hocks on a rotisserie spit. I haven't tried this recipe, but I must say the finished product looks delectable. Here's a link to the blog post in question: http://www.evilshenanigans.com/2010/09/schweinshaxe-spatzle-und-rotkohl-pork-knuckle-spatzle-and-red-cabbage/.

boudin noir, if you try it, please let us know back here how it came out!

Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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It does look good. I've had braised hocks before but never by spit-roasting. However, I found a blog post that says there are 2 ways to prepare Munich Schweinshaxe: either braised in sauerkraut, or seasoned and left to dry in the refrigerator to get that tight skin, then spit-roasted. There's a picture of two hocks on a rotisserie spit, and I must say the finished product looks delectable. Here's a link to the blog post in question: http://www.evilshenanigans.com/2010/09/schweinshaxe-spatzle-und-rotkohl-pork-knuckle-spatzle-and-red-cabbage/.

boudin noir, if you try it, please let us know back here how it came out!

Excellent hunting! I see they are spit roasted for 2 1/2 hours suggesting a slow roast some distance from the fire which should ensure a well cooked and tender interior.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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Followup on pork shank. I was presented with a 5lb pork shank by my nephew. I let it sit out for about 5 hours to get to room temp. I scored the skin, salted it, ad cooked it on my Lynx grill rotisseri for 4 hours. At that point it looked magnificent. We weren't ready to eat so I held it in a 200 f. oven for 45 minutes. It was just like the schweinhaxe we had in Munich. Great crackling, moist meat.

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This would be a good experiment to try with Sous vide + rotisserie. I would probably Sous vide @ 145F for atleast 12-24 hours, then finish in the rotisserie till internal temperature of 155-175F. Less if the skin crisps up sooner.

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I still don't understand how you get the spit to go through shank, unless you are removing the bone first.

Jo,

I had the same issue but if you look at the photos in the link it appears that the centre pole of the spit goes in the flesh around the bone and is held by the spit spikes. Hard to explain.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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In 1993 I went sailing with a German gentleman who had a good chuckle when I told him how I cooked a pork shanks - long slow roast for 4+ hours. He came from Bremen and said I was wasting my time, telling me that they simply put the shanks into a big pot of water with an onion quartered, a chopped carrot, a teaspoon of peppercorns and a few bay leaves. Do not score the skin. Bring to a simmer and boil them for 2 hours then remove them and very gently score the skin and rub with salt. Stand on end on a grid in a pan and cook in a hot oven (I use 220C) for half an hour to crisp the skin. Although the skin feels soft when still in the oven, it crisps nicely as soon as the shanks are removed from the oven. Serve with sauerkraut, a few boiled potatoes, German mustard and a good dollop of apple sauce on the side. I have done them this way ever since. Magic!

Edited by JohnT (log)

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In 1993 I went sailing with a German gentleman who had a good chuckle when I told him how I cooked a pork shanks - long slow roast for 4+ hours. He came from Bremen and said I was wasting my time, telling me that they simply put the shanks into a big pot of water with an onion quartered, a chopped carrot, a teaspoon of peppercorns and a few bay leaves. Do not score the skin. Bring to a simmer and boil them for 2 hours then remove them and very gently score the skin and rub with salt. Stand on end on a grid in a pan and cook in a hot oven (I use 220C) for half an hour to crisp the skin. Although the skin feels soft when still in the oven, it crisps nicely as soon as the shanks are removed from the oven. Serve with sauerkraut, a few boiled potatoes, German mustard and a good dollop of apple sauce on the side. I have done them this way ever since. Magic!

Very interesting and surprising but you have obviously shown that it does the job. Thank you for sharing this.

Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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