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Truth be told: Where've you eaten lately? (Part 3)


DJOblong
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In the middle of a long weekend of Vespa madness, I squeezed in a dinner at Parkside.

I started with a Parkside Bellini, ooh, how good is that? roasted apricot sorbet, white rum, pomegranate syrup, Prosecco and peach juice. I think I just might survive the seasonal lack of the Blood Orange Negroni if I have this to tide me over. We had a bottle of Ridge Three Valleys Zinfandel, v dry and peppery, a little hot, easy to drink. I should know, I drank most of it :wink:

My dad and I lucked out and got another heirloom tomato salad, this one with Buffalo mozzarella and the most thinly-sliced red onions ever, with olive oil and fleur de sel. There were red, green, purple, yellow and orange tomatoes, and it’s really interesting to see how the flavours differ from one to another.

The kitchen can’t seem to resist spoiling us even when there’s no particular occasion, and we sampled a “gnocchi ragout” which was panfried heavenly little gnocchi with some cut broad green beans (? not sure what these are called), fresh peas, corn, and tomato, IIRC, with some arugula, my dad guessed, to provide a counterpoint to the lovely sweet vegetables.

For mains, we couldn’t resist the special, a crispy-skinned Cornish game hen with my new favourite, Sauce Colbert. The hen was on a bed of creamed spinach (which my dad remarked had absolutely no relationship to any creamed spinach he ever ate in his life--this stuff was reallllly nice) and homemade spaetzle. Ich liebe Spaetzle, wirklich. This sauce is just brilliant, and everything about the dish was perfect.

For dessert, we got two desserts to split: the coupe glacée, and the banoffi pie, which my dad hadn’t tried before. We were also treated to a darling little raspberry Napoleon, with lots of fresh raspberries and fresh peach and raspberry coulis patterns on the plate, lovely flavours and presentation.

Big yawn, I know, Deborah has another good dinner at Parkside :laugh:

Agenda-free since 1966.

Foodblog: Power, Convection and Lies

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^

I tried that tomato dish on the weekend, too. It was a substantial salad with all those tomatoes and a big slice of buffalo mozzerella. It is a great time of the year for tomatoes.

We split a peach tart for dessert, but asked about the homemade marshmallows that is part of another dessert and our server brought us a complimentary bowl of the marshmallows with our tart. Nice touch.

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“gnocchi ragout” which was panfried heavenly little gnocchi with some cut broad green beans (? not sure what these are called),

Perhaps they were romano beans? I had some of these fresh from a farm, with homemade walnut mayonnaise and crunchy sea salt awhile ago and they were just spectacular.

Thanks for another great description of what sounds to be a delicious meal!

Edited by Ling (log)
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“gnocchi ragout” which was panfried heavenly little gnocchi with some cut broad green beans (? not sure what these are called),

Perhaps they were romano beans? I had some of these fresh from a farm, with homemade walnut mayonnaise and crunchy sea salt awhile ago and they were just spectacular.

Thanks for another great description of what sounds to be a delicious meal!

From the google images, I think that may be the bean. Thanks! :smile:

Agenda-free since 1966.

Foodblog: Power, Convection and Lies

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Bumbershoot weekend in Seattle: Le Pichet - My friend had the oeufs plats, jambon et fromage {two eggs broiled with ham and gruyere}, I had the poêlon périgourdin {farm egg broiled in a skillet with seared foie gras, served with brown bread and grape preserves}. Foie first thing in my tummy made for a good start to the day...walked around Pike Place and picked up some perfectly ripened donut peaches...

...only to be followed by a truckload of icky fair food - strawberry lemonades, that infamous "shortcake" monstrosity, 99 cent crispy chicken burgers at Wendy's drive-through.

Came back into town and closed off the last weekend of summer at Parkside with a round of martinis. I tried the bellini, and while it was intriguing with the roasted apricot sorbet, for me it'll always still be the lemon drop.

Edited by PearL (log)
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Empire Seafood in Richmond -

Dim sum: Discovered this place quite by accident when the wait at the Kirin across the street proved too daunting. After our initial visit, this will be our first choice from now on. Great dim sum. Among the highlights: a pork liver rice noodle dish that we ordered by accident and ended up loving. And the egg tarts! Oh boy. I'm not a huge fan (unlike my wife), but I love them here - always fresh and warm, with a hint of coconut.

Dinner: Excellent sharkfin soup and incredibly tender abalone with steamed peatip leaves (they're running a special, both dishes for $38), a wonderful steamed fish (my wife ordered and I don't remember exactly what it was), delicious pork belly and bok choy, the steamed turnip cake with its atypical but delicious pudding-like consistency, and an order of terrific sticky rice with preserved meats. A perfect meal.

Sea Harbor in Richmond -

Dim Sum: Another great dim sum destination. But get there early. Highlights: tender conch in garlic paste, fried smelts with garlic chips, steamed turnip cake, and the so-darn-good buns filled with sweet-salty egg yolk that arrive warm and gooey at your table.

Kimono -

Dinner: Some alright hand cones (the beef was a stand-out) and an inedible "spicy salmon sashimi" made with black bean that proved not at all spicy. Service was...wanting. My wife asked if they could switch out the spicy scallop cone for the unagi cone in one of the trio cone orders and was told she could. When her unagi cone arrived, it was slathered with Vietnamese hot sauce. She called the waiter over who seemed just as mystified by the hot sauce on the unagi and rereated to the kitchen. Moments later, he was back, unagi in tow. He explained that even though she had asked for the unagi cone, she had technically ordered the spicy trio cone so everything had to be spicy - that's the way it was and did she still want it? Charged for two seaweed salads instead of the lone one we received. I know, I know. You can't judge a restaurant on only one visit - but if I'm going to go back, I'm going to need a date because my wife certainly won't accompany me.

LB

www.josephmallozzi.wordpress.com

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  • 3 weeks later...

Back to Sea Harbour Restaurant in Richmond for what turned out to be my most enjoyable dinner so far this year. The sharkfin soup was extraordinary, served in a brown sauce with the chicken broth on the side. Excellent abalone and a truly fantastic house chicken. We ended the meal with the steamed salty-sweet egg yolk buns I mentioned in a previous most. Wow.

Kusshi in Richmond: Nice decor and some interesting menu items, some of which are almost identical to the ones offered at the various Shota restaurants. I assume there's some connection. They offer some pricey offerings including o-toro. Good but, for my money, I prefer Sushikan. Service was a little...odd. I was confused by a couple of the sushi items: cobia and saama. When I asked the waitress, she hesitated, then informed me: "It's a kind of fish." No. Really.

Toshi Sushi: Whenever we drive by the place, there is always a line-up so wwent early - and got the last free table. Good sushi although my wife was put off by the film lining the insides of our tea cups.

www.josephmallozzi.wordpress.com

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Hanaro Mart Restaurant - the local grocery stores has a fairly-sized restaurant inside it's store. My kids ate donkatsu (breaded pork chops) with udon noodles while I had gukbab (boiled beef blood stew).

Jangsujeon Restaurant - the restaurant only serves two things - whole chicken rice porridge and spicy buckwheat noodle salad. The chicken sliced open and is cooked with dates, ginseng and whole garlic. This is covered with rice and cooked for a long time. The chicken is then served flat on a platter while the rice soup (now similar to a congee consistency) is served beside it in a large clay pot. Side dishes include picked radish and radish kimchee slices.

Pizza Hut Restaurant - we ordered our favorite thin crust pepperoni pizza (making sure they put the pepperoni on top not under the cheese -> korean way). We also had their appetizer sampler platter that had chicken quesadillas, beef ribs, baked potato skins and buffalo wings.

Doddie aka Domestic Goddess

"Nobody loves pork more than a Filipino"

eGFoodblog: Adobo and Fried Chicken in Korea

The dark side... my own blog: A Box of Jalapenos

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Back to Sea Harbour Restaurant in Richmond for what turned out to be my most enjoyable dinner so far this year.  The sharkfin soup was extraordinary, served in a brown sauce with the chicken broth on the side.  Excellent abalone and a truly fantastic house chicken.  We ended the meal with the steamed salty-sweet egg yolk buns I mentioned in a previous most.  Wow.

I am a big fan of Sea Harbour also - though I must admit I have not had the Shark Fin offerings there (partially guilt, partially I'm too cheap).

You should check out the Shark Fin offerings at Gingeri also - they have whole meals built around Shark Fin and Abalone. Their treatment is lighter - not a lot of heavy sauces. Very good. The only mistep in the meal I had last time was the use of frozen veggies in their ginger rice - WTF!. As I have posted previously - I think that their desserts are top notch.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Long's Noodle House: We stopped in for the best wine chicken and wine fish in the city. We also enjoyed an order of garlic-sauteed spinach.

Shalin Noodle House: Nutritious soup with lamb and stewed pancake. Delicious. Also had the corn with pine nuts, fried lamb with spicy cumin, and the pork dumplings. Everything was great. My wife and I love this place.

Empire Seafood in Richmond: Oh, dear. This place makes the best egg tarts around (only at dim sum) and offers a pretty good dinner menu. However, we made the mistake of going last night during the Autumn Moon festival. It was crazy-busy and, as a result, I'll cut the service some slack - but there were some major food missteps that I found unforgivable. We ordered two large abalone and received the smaller versions, an oversight they apologized for. I was comparing the abalone served here with that served at Sun Sui Wah, commenting on the fact that, althought the abalone was tender, the brown sauce wasn't as thick or flavorful as the versions I'd had elsewhere - then glanced over and noticed that the party table beside us were enjoying their abalone in that thicker version I'd so enjoyed elsewhere. We had some gai lan (sic?) which my wife enjoyed, and some tasty Peking pork chops. We ordered a steamed fish that was presented to us live then carried off into the kitchen where it disappeared for a good 40 minutes. When it was served, we found the flesh mushy and devoid of taste. When my wife commented on the dish's texture, our suddenly flustered waiter assured us that it was the same fish we had been shown earlier. Hmmm. Neither my wife or I had even considered the possibility of a "fish switch" but, after the waiter's anxious denial, my wife (a conspiracy theorist by nature) assumed that's exactly what had happened. For my part, I'm willing to give the place the benefit of the doubt but since: a) my wife is a grudge-holder, and b) I'm partial to Sea Harbour and Shanghai Rivier, it's unlikely we'll be back.

www.josephmallozzi.wordpress.com

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Disclaimer: This is what I do when avoiding a paper due at school.... I write one for no credit at all. You've been warned.

I've got 4:

I've been contributing to the Earls family lately....

Joey's on Broadway

We had the same as always...

Ahi Tuna Tacos - mmmmmmmmmmmmmmmmm

Lettuce Wraps - always tasty

Ginger Beef (without the hot peppers) - same as above

Blue Cheese Fries - a new reason to live - absolute heaven

I detest the excessive wait at this place but it reminds me of when Cactus Club opened on Broadway and Granville (at which I worked at that time)....hype, hype, hype. It'll slow eventually and I'll get over it. It's a great room, too.

Earls on Fir

I wanted the spinach dip but apparently they are not using spinach yet because of "the whole spinach debacle".... which makes me wonder why they get their spinach from California rather than locally....?

So we had the Sesame Seared Wonton Tuna Stack...it was alright...the tuna was seared with togarashi spice on the outside and then thinly sliced...it was quite dry and relatively flavourless other than the bit of spice on the outside. It is served with little strips of fried wonton wrappers (which normally have spice on them but I ordered without as I am one of those poor people who can't handle anything hot, though I love it), but they were so narrow that it was hard to get the tuna and accompanying avocado and tomato salad actually on top... !?!? Side plates would have been helpful too.

We had the Sicilian pizza which was tasty as predicted and the chicken and rib combo (my bf has never ordered anything but this at Earls except the time we went after he got his wisdom teeth out and he had soup).

Bin 942

A personal favourite of mine, much to my bf's chagrin. Not that he doesen't enjoy the food, he just wants a lot more (he's a rugby player - he's happy with KD for dinner) . He's more into the idea of ordering an appetizer and then an entree, and then being full. Me, not so much.

Frites, as always (I dream about these), excellent.

Cinnamon and Chili Rubbed Flank steak.... (my secret excuse to get more frites on the table)...I love the balsamic reduction that comes with the frites but when they come with the flank steak you instead have the deliciously sweet sauce to mop up....SO good.

Scallop and Tiger Prawn Tournedos - I love every thing about this dish - the leek tempura thingy on top, the cucumber salsa, the sweet bonito butter sauce...all delish.

Black Olive Hommous with fry bread...yum.......

and I always order the Caesar Salad, because even though one may think that a caesar salad would be pretty damn easy, you'd be shocked at how few restaurants do it well...really! The Bin caesar is in a league of it's own - hands down the best I've ever had.... and being the formerly Ridiculously picky eater I once was (and perhaps am still just a little bit), I have had more than my share of caesar salads.

And now for the piece de resistance....

We went for dinner last night at.... the Flying Tiger

I took it upon myself as a loyal foodie to try as many dishes as possible to give the most informative review possible :raz:

We were seated at perhaps the most uncomfortable table in the room (I take the blame for not making a reservation - it was clear we were lucky to get a table at all considering the stream of people that continued to come in even past 10:00). We were right and I mean RIGHT by the washrooms (you know the table at Feenies where there is a fire extinguisher on the wall immediately beside you? Worse.) on little leather squares (rather than chairs) with no backs, so I had to wrap my long coat around myself to avoid it being on the floor! Don't worry, things rapidly improved....

We started with the Roti Canai, $4, malaysian fry bread with malaysian peanut sauce. It was served piping hot, and the sauce was not too spicy for me (which most everything usually is so I was pleasantly surprised) and the bread was delicious, flaky and light.

We then had the Flying Tiger Samosas, $6, which were again SMOKIN' hot (as it turned out, every dish was. Yay freshness!) and very tasty. They come with a coconut and tamarind chutney which isn't as much a sauce as it is a topping - it is grated coconut tossed with the chutney so you more or less pile it on top of the bite you are about to take. Yummy, nonetheless.

Next we had the Satay Malaysia, Sambal Kacang , $12, which is listed on the menu as chicken and beef satays but is in fact only chicken. It was served with the same tasty peanut sauce as the roti. It was alright, not spectacular. If I ever have it again I will ask for it to be well done as I thought that the chicken was not quite cooked enough, though I am a little paranoid.

Next on the list was what I imagine was the Javanese BBQ Cornish Game Hen ,($15, I am looking at their menu on their website right now for memory refreshment). I am certain that that is not what it is called now...it was not half a chicken, rather two legs, but yummy anyway (sticky sweet soy glaze) and the coconut and pineapple slaw and fried rice that accompanied it were damn tasty, especially eaten together with the cold/hot contrast. Price wise, iffy for two little legs and the 1/4 cup portions of accompaniments. Is game hen expensive at a butcher/grocery store? I may be wrong here, as I have never bought it myself.

Next up was the Hawker Street Noodles $12. There was nothing bad about this dish but nothing special either. The little bits of crispy chicken (there were very few, tiny little pieces) were sharp (in texture). The flavour was pretty unexciting. Again, price point also seemed off for a small noodle dish with a wee bit of seafood.

We then tried the Szechuan Green Beans, $5. Very tasty, not too spicy, very reminiscent of the same dish at Sandbar.

We also tried the Poori Fry Bread $2, as I remembered it mentioned in a review somewhere as being similar to the fry bread at Bin. It is similar, however, it has something dusted on it that has a citrus (lemongrass?) flavour and a sweet flavour. It was good but whatever was dusted was very strong.

Last to mention was the Vegetable Tempura, $4 . Personally I would stick to that at a Japanese restaurant. Not that it was bad, but again, the dipping sauce was hard to dip in and I hate mushrooms, which I have never seen in tempura before (personal preference, I know). The batter was nice though, light and crunchy.

As for drinks, I had the Chalet Pinot Gris (BC), which I've never hear of before and loved, and the bf had the Singha which was served traditionally with a tiny little glass.

Service was friendly and efficient, similar to Bin style (as was the food service, which we were informed of at the beginning - food cooked, food come!) where everyone helps out, which is nice. Price point was mixed. Some of the "Larger" plates we ordered were nowhere near worth their price tag, but some of the "Smaller" plates were more food than I expected for what was charged.

Overall, I would absolutely refer anyone who enjoys this type of dining (food arrives when it is ready, shared plates, etc) as the food was overall excellent. I was also impressed when Tina Fineza herself came out on the floor and cleared our plates and asked how everything was. It is always refreshing to see a chef who would actually come out to the floor and, rather than make it clear they are the creator of all dishes etc etc, just to see a cleaned plate on a table and to remove it. It's all about flow, people. Back scratching. Anyone who has worked in a restaurant knows what I mean.

Try it, folks! It was great, and it would be great place to go with a group (and unlike Bin, they take reservations so such could be a reality rather than just a dream!!!!) so that everyone can try even more items! I feel bad for my bf that I'm not more adventurous in the eating department (no pork, no shellfish, very little beef, halibut and salmon, and absolutely nothing with bones). I will go back with him and my best friend who happily enjoys chicken feet. She is sure to try ribs and duck with him! Both looked great when they arrived on the table next to us but I just couldn't do it.

Anyway, sorry for the essay, it's been a good week of food and I'm always stoked to try something new, as I think we all are. Happy eating!

"Never eat more than you can lift" -Miss Piggy

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Hey, I get to play this game once. :biggrin:

Kintaro - shoyu ramen and forest fire ramen, coming from Seattle where there is no ramen I have been in withdrawal for seven years now, problem solved.

Feenie's - burger and Feenie's Weenie and the apple tart with carmel and fleur de sel ice cream, the burger was solid, the weenie rocked, and the dessert was killer

Kirin on Cambie - blows any Seattle dim sum out of the water

Pictures

Rocky

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  • 1 month later...

My last three dinners out: Gasthaus Ubl (Vienna, Austria) last night. This is one of the great traditional gasthaus restaurants of Vienna. Cioppino's four nights ago. Restaurant Aux Charpentiers, 6th Arrondisement, Paris, about 9 nights ago.

My last three lunches out: Don Don Noodle Cafe on Cambie two days ago, Joe's Grill on 4th Avenue five days agoand Bistro Sakana in Yaletown about a full week ago.

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You seem to get around.

Culinary Research?

Culinary resarch is what I should say to the Customs Officer at YVR upon my return, should I be asked for the reasons why I was in Vienna. No, not quite. Here on business. Tonight, I ate at the Goldene Zeiten (see: www.goldenezeiten.at), considered Vienna's top Chinese Restaurant and where Susur Lee of Toronto will cook for a week starting next week. The room was lovely, but it was basically Chinese served to look like food one gets in high-end European cuisine restaurants. Certainly not the way high end Chinese is served in places such as Taipei, Hong Kong, Shanghai or Richmond.

Edited by Kloom (log)
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Pam and I shared some bifstek cigarillos - with an f-ing fantastic chirribusco - at TEMPLE in Victoria.

It's so great to visit Victoria and dine out with Pam.

Memo - pray, pray, pray for an edible day

Edited by Memo (log)

Ríate y el mundo ríe contigo. Ronques y duermes solito.

Laugh, and the world laughs with you. Snore, and you sleep alone.

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Tomokazu: late night all you can eat. In terms of all you can eat, I think this is the only place that I could go to (I've had horrible past experiences namely food poisoning form places like E-bei, Shabusen, etc). The sashimi wasa pretty fresh, chopped scallop cone was excellent, all of their fried dishes (tonkatsu, chicken katsu, tempura, adegashi tofu, etc) were all pretty good, all of their rolls were okai, I would advise to stay away from the tuna sashimi, it looked too brown to be edible...

Chambar: Great as always. Usually a big Hoegaarden fan, but this time decided to venture and try Leffe, sweet and crisp. Started with the phyllo wrapped duck confit, went down wonderfully with the sauce and cranberry dressing. The mussels congolaise was amazing as usual (it's the best dish there I'd say), the flavours blend together to create an intoxicating experience. The poutine was exceptional with the use of blue cheese, gastronomical! Had the lamb shank as my main, but found it rather, big and although the texture of the meat was good, it tasted like...plain meat?! The spices and sauces outplayed the shank itself, hence resulted in an unbalance of flavours. I personally really enjoy the side dish, the sweet & tartness of cranberries and apricots in the cous cous makes it a perfect pairing for the shank. Decided to go to Sweet Obessions for desserts and could not stop eating their Conconcorde, hoever the bittersweet chocolate cake was less than extraordinary...

Cardero's: Walking into Cardero's, it's upbeat and refined ambiance is immediately apparent. While waiting at the bar, we got some drinks and the stir fried squid/calamari was exceptional, a must try!! Then we were relocated to our table and we ordered fried oysters and I had stir fried seafood as my main. The oysters were good, nice and plump, and the serving size of my entree was unexpectedly big, the seafood was fresh, but the dish is not exactly to-die-for. The dessert on the other hand, apple cranberry tart was simply delectable. The pastry was perfect, its buttery taste was flavourable but not at all overpowering or oily. The tartness of the fruits balanced well with the crust and vanilla gelato that accompanied the dish. The apple pieces were still crunchy and crisp, hence offering a dessert that excels in appearance, taste and, texture.

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Last three dinners (all three being Japanese is purely coincidence)...

1. Kingyo (871 Denman Street, Vancouver) First time visit. One of the things I noticed right away while sitting at the sushi bar was the big grin on the chef's face. He was thouroughly enjoying his job and you could tell as he joked with other staff and customers. When the guy making your food likes his job that much I feel it's good indication I am going to get a quality meal from him. Plus it's just pleasant to see someone smile. I managed to sample a good selection of the offerings and standouts for me included Tokyo sukiyaki, grilled beef tongue and stone unagi bowl.

2. Kitanoya Guu with Garlic (1698 Robson Street, Vancouver) I have been a patron here for some time now. Kitanoya Guu with Garlic is one of my favorites in the city for izakaya. The assorted oden has always been a favorite and I have yet to dig into a better kaki-mayo-yaki. I am also impressed with their efforts in introducing new items to the menu.

3. Samurai Japanese Restuarant (1108 Davie Street, Vancouver) I have also been visiting Samurai for many years, usually on my lunchbreaks as I work nearby. Decent quality fish in massive cuts for very good prices. I like the katsudon on a rainy day.

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Konnichiwa from Japan. I had the most inventive, memorable dinner I've ever had in my life, and my first foray into molecular gastronomy at the Oriental Mandarin Tokyo's Tapas Molecular Bar. 2+ hours, 28 courses. I did a write up on each of the tiny dishes, with pics, in the December 5, 2006 Part II installment of my travel blog -

http://www.josephmallozzi.blogspot.com/

www.josephmallozzi.wordpress.com

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Nevermind

I do enjoy the food here, but the drinks are poor (EXTREMELY watered down, DO NOT get the mojito or cider!!!) and the ambiance is mediocre at best (horrible music for a restaurant of its type). However, I must say that I am extremely addicted to the yam fries with its vinegar drizzle, its a great deal at $4.95 for a HUGE portion. As well, the artichoke quesadilla & old school pizza are great picks!

Shanghai River

Came here for lunch with some friends, fast and friendly service. It probably has the best xiao long bao in Vancouver (although I'm very nostalgic for the ones that I had in shanghai). All the dishes were done fairly well, (I LUV the fried bun with condensed milk :wub: ) and the dishes are very well priced!!

Lumiere

Being voted as one of Vancouver's top restaurants, I had expected better from lumiere. The layout was much too cramped, especially when you have two extremly loud conversations going on to your left and right. When the server was pouring water for our adjacent table, his clothing actually touched my boyfriend's bread plate...when I got up to go to the washroom I hit the table next to us (...my waist is 25 inches...my hips ARE NOT that big). We both had the signature menu, and I must say that the Pan-seared scallop and the duck broth wonton were the best. The lobster gnocchi was overcooked, causing it to have a way too gummy texture, the main dish, the sous-vide rabbit saddle was mushy-like. The other dishes were okay, not extraordinary. The gala apple three ways should be a bit more tart, because even for a dessert addict like myself, it was way too sweet, I didn't even touch the star anise sauce. However, the trio of autumn desserts was delicious, in particular the gingerbread cannoli with tonka bean mousse, the jaconde paired nicely with the maple syrup ice-cream, I was extremely satisfied!! Then of course the mignardises, all of which were very delectable, especially the macroon, very similar to one that I had in an excellent French bakery in Quebec city.

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Not being in the best of health at the moment I haven't been out much aside from soup at Tim Horton's with one of my daughters.

However, we had the pleasure of kind of eating out while at home. Chef Metcalf was very generous and made my family a bunch of freezer meals to use when I'm especially tired. We've only tried the Pesto Chicken so far but it was excellent! I was suprised at how tender a chicken breast could be that has been thawed and reheated in the microwave. Her meals all came in single serve portions which makes them very versatile. An excellent option for busy people who like to eat well.

Her website is Travelling Gourmet.

Edited by CanadianBakin' (log)

Don't wait for extraordinary opportunities. Seize common occasions and make them great. Orison Swett Marden

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