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Salsify - How to prepare?


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peel them and plunge the peeled roots into lightly acidulated water (juice of half a lemon in a bowl of water); if you don't, they'll discolor.

* simmer salsify in lightly salted water, then drain and sauté in a little unsalted butter.

* sauté in unsalted butter with onion or leek, then simmer in water, chicken stock or vegetable stock until tender; remove pot from heat, then working in batches, purée in a blender; return soup to pot, stir in a little light cream; cook until warmed through. taste for salt and pepper, then serve.

basically use as you would parsnips, carrots or turnips. they have a faint "artichoke heart" flavor to my palate.

Edited by SobaAddict70 (log)
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I had to  google it, salsify can be anything from  a white root to a black.  Oyster plant is aparently either purple  salsify or sconzonera roots  ( black salsify).

Well  have only grown and eaten the black skinned salsify and we called them Poorman's  asparagus . I use a drop of distilled vinegar in the water  so they wont discolour.  Blanch it quickly if used for something else then boiling.  We used to use them as potatoes when I was little.  Boiled, fried, baked and  made into soup.

 

http://www.rivercottage.net/recipes/salsify-and-scorzonera-gratin/  this recipe looks intressting,  just use 8 roots of the same and see what happens.

 

What ever you  do, dont eat it raw, that can give  really bad tummy aches.

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Cheese is you friend, Cheese will take care of you, Cheese will never betray you, But blue mold will kill me.

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This is what's available at my farmer's market, usually sometime between early January and the middle of March.

14478674482_77a9d61957_z.jpg

Doesn't look so appetizing, does it? Has a black/dark brown peel and white flesh. When exposed to air, the flesh tends to oxidize (like apples, for instance).

Something I did back in February.

12559931475_5239487495_z.jpg

Carrots and salsify, with lime, Indian spices and burrata

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I dont have the  recipe exactly, but we used to  tender cook the salsify,  make a thick  bechamel sauce, slice the root into  coins, layer in a casserole dish, pour the white sauce over, just to cover and lube it all up and then good cheese on top and bake until golden  on high heat. 

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Cheese is you friend, Cheese will take care of you, Cheese will never betray you, But blue mold will kill me.

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 Interesting how SobaAddict and CatPoet have paired salsify with cream or other dairy. I once ate a memorably good risotto with salsify at a local restaurant, and that risotto had cheese in it, Bellwether Farms Crescenza cheese, which is buttery, creamy, and tart.

 

The risotto had mushrooms, leeks, salsify, and red Belgian endive (radicchio) in it. If I were to cook this at home, I would start with a good recipe for the classic mushroom-leek risotto. I would cook the salsify per the simmer-saute method described by SobaAddict (post #2), then cut the salsify in bite-size pieces. The endive would be cut in bite-size strips and sauteed. Both the salsify and the endive would be added to the risotto at end of cooking time, along with the sauteed mushrooms.

 

At the restaurant, the Crescenza cheese was dropped in a few dollops on the surface of the risotto. You could sub teleme cheese or sour cream/creme fraiche for this, or even mix in grated parmesan as in the classic mushroom-leek risotto. I think all of these cheeses would taste good.

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I didn't intentionally pair it with dairy; it was what I had on hand at the time.

You can turn it into chips or simmer it in a little bit of broth and purée it (I don't mean as a soup, but rather as a "mash", like pure di patate for example), and have it accompany it fish. Salmon or arctic char is an idea.

Edited by SobaAddict70 (log)
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You can also first cook the salsify before peeling. It's less messy this way.

 

I always use a garden hose to rinse off all the soil on the lawn. There's a lot of soil attached to the roots.

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  • 6 years later...

Bumpity bump...

 

The local coop had salsify in the store. I am looking for new ideas on how to cook them. Any suggestions out there?

 

Thanks!

"Salt is born of the purest of parents: the sun and the sea." --Pythagoras.

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