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Chili Pepper Identification


liuzhou
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Well, I'm sorry but It says in the link you supplied that they are.

I'm not sure how you could take one statement from an entire page and assume the pepper described were "sweet" when 90% of the text on the page described them as hot and indeed the name of the peppers is "Marbles Hot peppers".

 

The following paragraph immediate precedes the sentence you quoted.

"

Varying between individual plants, Marbles Hot peppers contain quite a broad range of capsaicin levels. Some offer a mild tease of 300 to 500 Scoville Heat Units - about the same friendly slap you'd get from various types of Tabasco sauce. Other Marbles Hots meanwhile, provide a more full-on punch. The FBI (Fire-Breathing Idiot), or Ted to his friends - the chilli aficionado and famous taster - rates some Marbles Hots (of the Aji Bolivian variety) at 55,000 SHU's. That's around 15 times hotter than a fiery Jalepeño, and is not to be sneezed at. Of course, this is incomparable to the Titans of the chilli world - the 7 Pots, Morugas, Nagas and the like, but not everyone is up for dicing with rocket fuel at dinnertime. Marbles Hots offer a respectable, manageable, pleasant heat.

Another Marbles Hots reviewer offered: "They are HOT! I thought they would be milder and bit into one and wasn't expecting the good amount of heat I got"."

 

And the following immediately follows the sentence you quote.

"

Chilli gurus are happily messing with breeds all the time, to create extra-pretty or (more commonly) extra-hot strains. But as far as I know, at present there are for now 4 varieties of Marbles Hot pepper: the good old standard Marbles Hot, Holiday Marbles Hot, Marbles 5-Colour Hot, and Aji Bolivian Marbles Hot.

Marbles Hot peppers are of the taxonomic group Capsicum annuum, and grow ½-inch-wide round chillies. They turn from green to cream or white, then yellow, orange, purple, and then red when mature. The small Marbles Hot pepper plants are adored by gardeners for their beauty. Marbles Hots are all over many farmers' markets and horticultural shows as 'edible ornamentals'. Oregon State University, USA, had a hand in manipulating them to the form they are in now, but they are said to originate from either South America or Mexico. Serious gardening website myfolia.com says from Mexico.

Marbles 5-Colour Hots are as Holiday Marbles Hots, but instead of turning green to red, they bring pleasure to the eyeballs by going from white to yellow, to purple, to orange, to red when mature.

They can be classed as 'hot', ranging in pungency from 5,000 to 30,000 Scoville Units (thanks Dave's Garden for those figures).

"

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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I'm not sure how you could take one statement from an entire page and assume the pepper described were "sweet" when 90% of the text on the page described them as hot and indeed the name of the peppers is "Marbles Hot peppers".

 

 

Because the sentence clearly and emphatically says they are sweet, perhaps.

 

Hot doesn't preclude sweet.

 

You are confusing two different things. 

 

Anyway, they aren't what I have.

Edited by liuzhou (log)

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

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Peppers freely cross-pollinate and give rise to variants, especially in climates where the plants survive for several years.  Variant plants were always springing up in my compost heap; I'd move them to the garden and get all sorts of color & shape novelties.  So your search for an identical pepper elsewhere in the world or an English name is probably fruitless.  You're looking at a local pepper, grown and sustained by people who like it.  Why assume that an identical pepper exists anywhere else?

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Peppers freely cross-pollinate and give rise to variants, especially in climates where the plants survive for several years.  Variant plants were always springing up in my compost heap; I'd move them to the garden and get all sorts of color & shape novelties.  So your search for an identical pepper elsewhere in the world or an English name is probably fruitless.  You're looking at a local pepper, grown and sustained by people who like it.  Why assume that an identical pepper exists anywhere else?

 

 

Yep, I agree. Peppers are self-fertile but crossing is extremely common via the help of insects.

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So your search for an identical pepper elsewhere in the world or an English name is probably fruitless. You're looking at a local pepper, grown and sustained by people who like it. Why assume that an identical pepper exists anywhere else?

 

As I have agreed

 

 

You're looking at a local pepper, grown and sustained by people who like it. Why assume that an identical pepper exists anywhere else?

 

 

I don't. I never did. I just asked if anyone knew an English name.

...your dancing child with his Chinese suit.

 

The Kitchen Scale Manifesto

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