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Flirtini losing all the fizz


BladeDodger
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I'm trying my hand at making some champagne cocktails but I'm not having much success.

 

I'm trying to follow

on youtube.  I think I'm following his steps pretty much, but the second I pour champagne into the glass it loses all fizz - every single bubble.  The guy in the video just poured his straight in and it seemed fine, but even when I try tilting the glass so it gently enters the mixture, it flows down the glass fine, but the second it hits the mixture it basically explodes into a fizzy mess.  It tastes pretty awful.

 

Does anyone have any ideas where I am going wrong, or what I could try to make it work?

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The first thing I'd address is where you said "it tastes pretty awful". I'm no expert but it seems to me that, if you don't like the taste of the drink without the bubbles, you're probably not going to like the taste much more with the bubbles.

It's kinda like wrestling a gorilla... you don't stop when you're tired, you stop when the gorilla is tired.

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I'm trying my hand at making some champagne cocktails but I'm not having much success.

 

I'm trying to follow

on youtube.  I think I'm following his steps pretty much, but the second I pour champagne into the glass it loses all fizz - every single bubble.  The guy in the video just poured his straight in and it seemed fine, but even when I try tilting the glass so it gently enters the mixture, it flows down the glass fine, but the second it hits the mixture it basically explodes into a fizzy mess.  It tastes pretty awful.

 

Does anyone have any ideas where I am going wrong, or what I could try to make it work?

As I mentioned in another thread, most internet videos aren't going to be your best teacher.  

 

Although you could watch a David Wondrich video, Or you could watch Charlotte make a French 75.

 

Or you might start simple, with a champagne cocktail.

 

Save the disgusting, sweet, ridiculous cocktails for later.

Mitch Weinstein aka "weinoo"

Tasty Travails - My Blog

My eGullet FoodBog - A Tale of Two Boroughs

Was it you baby...or just a Brilliant Disguise?

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I'm no expert but it seems to me that, if you don't like the taste of the drink without the bubbles, you're probably not going to like the taste much more with the bubbles.

 

I don't know about that - I doubt many people like flat coke.  I've had the drink in the place the video is from and it is pretty good.

 

 

Thanks for the links weinoo.  I'll have a go at those and see if I fare any better.

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If it tastes 'pretty awful', I doubt there's any way to make this work for you; the name strongly suggests the sort of thing designed exclusively to get inexperienced girls and women drunk (i.e. the only things that matter are sugar and alcohol content), and those tend to be bad news if you have any tastebuds.

Michaela, aka "Mjx"
Manager, eG Forums
mscioscia@egstaff.org

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Serious answer

Perhaps you are using colder ice than the bar does and getting little ice shards in your drink when you shake. This would produce a lot of rough surfaces and smash the bubbles. Or, if your drink tastes awful but you enjoy the bar version your ingredients may differ in some important aspect eg the sugar content of the raspberry puree, and whatever the difference is could also explain the bubbles problem. I wouldn't really expect either of those to totally flatten the Champagne on impact, though.

 

Facaetious answer

Your Champagne has seen its fate and simply lost the will to live :biggrin:  

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Try raspberry syrup rather than puree... or perhaps run your puree through several strainers of increasing fineness.  You want it to be nothing but liquid.  All the little bits of raspberry are giving the CO2 something to grab onto and leave the solution. 

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Christopher D. Holst aka "cdh"

Learn to brew beer with my eGCI course

Chris Holst, Attorney-at-Lunch

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