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JoNorvelleWalker

Drinks! 2014 (Part 2)

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Hassouni's Irie Ites:

 

Take a large glass

Fill with ice

Add a large glug of WNOP (3ish oz)

Add a generous splash of my homemade pimento bitters (sub Bittercube Jamaican Bitters #1)

Squeeze of fresh lime (not measured)

Top with Ting

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I had a lemon that badly needed using up.  All afternoon I was looking forward to last rites.  But when the time came I just could not face Chartreuse   So I made Mississippi punch (Imbibe! pp 84,85) except that I cut the sugar from 1 1/2 tablespoons to 2 teaspoons, and used the juice of a whole lemon rather than 1/4.  It's amazing how people's tastes are different.

 

Now I'm finishing up a crafty and elusive elk:  Vida and Ocho plata Fresnos.  Previously I've used Tobala for my mezcal -- which of course is more than very good -- but Tobala with falernum pains my heart.

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In the case of Campari, I think it's because they're not allowed to use cochineal beetles any more. Same for Aperol?

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In the case of Campari, I think it's because they're not allowed to use cochineal beetles any more. Same for Aperol?

 

Not allowed to by whom?  Still OK in the EU and US I believe.  My bottle of Tempus Fugit, made in the EU, has real little beetles according to the label.  The Aperol looks pretty plastic in comparison.

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I may have been misinformed.  The Wiki article on cochineal is a good read, and suggests the natural product may be making a comeback with concerns over artificial colourings.

 

Now back to our scheduled program ...

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After making a superlative Aviation with St. George dry rye gin, I decided to try it in a Holland Razor Blade variation. I used Eric Alperin's ratios and a pinch of piment d'espelette. I don't think it was the best gin for this drink, or maybe the ratios need some tweaking (reducing the lemon juice and simple syrup so the lemon is more an accent than a dominant flavor).

 

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Last night it was a pour of the 2014 Limited Edition Single Barrel from Four Roses. While perhaps not the revelation of the 2013 (one of the best bourbons I've ever tasted, bar none), I did remark to the bartender that if it was made by Buffalo Trace it'd never even land on shelves. Then, a 'Spiker and Sponge', made with Dickel Rye, Peach Shrub, Lemon, and Honey, topped with a splash of local Rye IPA and Peychaud's.

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Last night it was a pour of the 2014 Limited Edition Single Barrel from Four Roses. While perhaps not the revelation of the 2013 (one of the best bourbons I've ever tasted, bar none), I did remark to the bartender that if it was made by Buffalo Trace it'd never even land on shelves. Then, a 'Spiker and Sponge', made with Dickel Rye, Peach Shrub, Lemon, and Honey, topped with a splash of local Rye IPA and Peychaud's.

 

The Four Roses limited editions, both Single Barrel and especially the Small Batch, are rapidly gaining cult status like the BTAC offerings and are likely to be a rare sight on a store shelf for the foreseeable future. It has increased in on premises allocation and will likely continue to get on premise focus over the amount allocated to stores I suspect.

 

The sad reality of the current whiskey rage I suppose.

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The Four Roses limited editions, both Single Barrel and especially the Small Batch, are rapidly gaining cult status like the BTAC offerings and are likely to be a rare sight on a store shelf for the foreseeable future. It has increased in on premises allocation and will likely continue to get on premise focus over the amount allocated to stores I suspect.

 

The sad reality of the current whiskey rage I suppose.

Right, they are very well respected & reviewed, but you don't have people sleeping on sidewalks and trading their first born to get a bottle like PVW or some BTACs, yet.

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chunks of ripe peach, a squirt of 2:1 Dem syrup, a larger splash of ancient lemon juice, and 2 oz WT101. Shaken HARD and fine strained (which was an immense pain in the ass and took forever). Served up. Good drink, smelled strongly of fresh peaches.

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Right, they are very well respected & reviewed, but you don't have people sleeping on sidewalks and trading their first born to get a bottle like PVW or some BTACs, yet.

 

 

Nope, not yet...

 

Although I am not sure that won't happen when the next Small Batch limited edition hits in the fall!

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Brought ingredients for The Man Comes Around to a dinner party last night and it proved quite the hit, not that I doubted it. Just don't always know if the crowd is going to be type that feels vodka and cranberry juice is a sophisticated cocktail.

Have been using Lepanto Gran Reserva as that is the only Spanish brandy I have on hand but otherwise sticking to the script. Nice cocktail for taking on the road and easy to make in a fairly large batch if needed.

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A Manhattan with Bulleit rye, Punt e Mes, Boker's bitters, brandied cherry garnish.

 

Not a success - metallic notes (probably from the Punt e Mes) were distracting, and the finish quasi inexistent. Maybe best not to use Punt e Mes in Manhattans? It's excellent in Negronis however.

 

14772760945_7d8f53cbd7_z.jpg
 

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What ratio did you use? I like Punt e Mes in my Manhattans, but it's assertive enough that I cut back on it versus a mellower sweet vermouth like, say, Dolin. You could always do what Death & Co. does and do a mix of Dolin Rouge and Punt e Mes in your Manhattans...

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I went with the usual 2:1.

 

You are right, mixing with another sweet vermouth seems to be the way to go. I also suspect it may be something with the Bulleit rye and Punt that did not click, so trying a different rye is another option.

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From various eGullet posts I understand that the weather in some parts of the northern hemisphere is uncomfortably hot.  Here it is cool, dare I almost say cold, given the season of the year.  I walked home from work tonight without a jacket, and badly needed somewhat to warm my toes.  Particularly as I am dead tired and it is well after midnight.

 

The logical choice was a double autumn in Jersey.  Garnish of lovely fresh mint.

 

Unfortunately the Laird's bonded ran out.  Search as I might, I could not find another bottle.  How could this happen?  I ended up using half Laird's bonded and half Laird's 12 year.  One could do much worse.  I filled the measure to the very top with fresh squeezed lemon juice.  No idea quite how much that is.  But it sure works.  The drink is delightfully warming and sips slowly as a perfect foil for salted peanuts.

 

Any time now I should start to feel my toes.

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A drink called the Tempest popped up on Cocktail Virgin Slut. I had all the ingredients and have been looking for some non-Tiki uses for Passionfruit Syrup, and this fit the treat.

 

Tempest

1.5 Oz Ron Abuelo Rum (Appleton V/X)

0.75 Oz Meletti

0.5 Oz Passionfruit Syrup

1 Oz Lime Juice

1 Oz Soda Water

Shake with ice and strain an ice filled rocks glass.

 

This took me two attempts to make, as I missed the line about the soda water and ice the first time, and just did it up. The drink actually worked both ways, the soda-less version being excellently intense, the other was much more refreshing. This is a fantastic drink overall, one of the better uses of Meletti I have found.

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Having been less than fully satisfied by a D.W.B. I am enjoying a white mai tai:  La Favorite/W&N/Cointreau.  How I love this combination!

 

Particularly when the mint is fresh and the straw is green, and the moon a tiny crescent.  What more could one ask?

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Variation on the Alexis' Bordeaux Sour via the Saveur website:

 

1 oz. lemon juice

1 T maple syrup

5-6 blackberries (subbed for 2 maraschino cherries)

2 oz. whiskey (Wiser's Legacy)

3/4 oz. Licor Beirao (subbed for 1 oz. Lillet Rouge)

1 egg white

5 dashes orange bitters (Hermes)

1 oz. seltzer

 

Muddle lemon juice, syrup and blackberries.  Add whiskey, Beirao, egg white, bitters.  Dry shake.  Add ice and shake.  Double strain into an ice filled glass and top with seltzer.  Garnish with blackberries.

 

An excellent sour.  

 

The Beirao is a nice addition.  Not too dominated by the anise flavor but with some interesting herbal elements that also contribute.  I often find absinthe a tricky cocktail ingredient.  The Beirao is a more forgiving substitute.  More wiggle room than with absinthe.

 

I think this is good enough to have another!  And so...once more unto the breach.

 

-Mike

 

 

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at work we just got a new menu from a new chef that I can't say I'm into. he is a mature chef from Sicily but he is into this strange grandeur I can't really get into and flouts a lot of the rules of Italy I really expected to see from someone of his generation who might try and teach us the old ways. we are a cash only neighborhood place and some of the dishes just don't seem to fit. especially the $40 special he tried to do. everything pretty much reminds me of the cocktail scene which doesn't understand quality for purpose or the word I think is so key, modesty.

 

all my bartender friends keep making these really grand drinks that have to be like $12 and come with creepy kick backs that get them trips to TOTC. there just isn't much modesty or even ingenuity for that matter in some of these spots and the clientele doesn't care, its all tech bubble money and my first cocktail bar to them. I keep looking for modesty, and when some bars have it, it goes unsung. the Green Street is Boston is probably the best example and easily among my favorite bars. its strange to think about because probably 8 years ago people freaked and commented when you put single malt scotch in a cocktail. it was sacrilege and the beginning of endless idiotic conversations then years later trends. but it wasn't about modesty. it wasn't like no cheese on seafood. it had nothing to do with quality for purpose. can cocktails at certain tier establishments have a no cheese on seafood rule or is that just stupid or maybe exactly the kind of stupid cocktail people love to debate?

 

anyhow.

 

.75 oz bourbon

.75 oz linie aquavit

.75 oz. lime juice

.5 oz. simple syrup

.25 oz. cape verdean cinnamon liqueur ($12.99 retail)

dash angostura

 

this was delicious but is it modest for a mutli component creative drink? I made it once for a friend then the next day someone wanted a lions tale but I didn't have any pimento dram so I made it again, then again for me.

 

.75 oz bermudez Don Armando 10 year ($23 / L)

.75 oz kalembu mamajuana (13.99)

.75 oz brandy mel (limao edition, $13.99)

.75 oz lime

 

this was a really tasty collage. the Don Armonda is tasty and from "the most prestigious distillery in the Dominican Republic". Kalembu is cool and their label is really interesting: "Since we have made all efforts to keep the tradition untouched, we have been awarded the Spiced Rum with Natural Flavors label approval." and "best before Dec/15".

 

I'm getting a no cheese on seafood tattoo.

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Modesty doesn't really enter into it here where drinkable cocktails are often $20. Perhaps a useful concept for you is the Japanese 'wabi'. I'm not really a fan of the WikiPedia article since it seems to miss the modest/unassuming/folk-art aspect that I associate with the origins of the idea.  I guess I'll have to go back and look at Yanagi's The Unknown Craftsman. I like the term 'honesty' - as in fit for purpose.  A $20 cocktail can be honest if it flows from the ambiance of the location while it would be out of place in your joint. Of course it can also be dishonest if it is just a way to sell an expensive drink rather than a way to use special ingredients or PITA preparation to elevate the experience. 

 

Even in the absence of inexpensive but obscure ingredients here, I like the idea of trying to bring out the best in whatever is at hand. So far there I have only found a couple of things that weren't worth the effort (and one of them I still have some hope for).

 

ETA: I like a bit of cheese with scallops


Edited by haresfur (log)

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