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Shel_B

Drop Biscuits

32 posts in this topic

KA says (if I recall correctly) that a cup of their self rising flour is 4-oz.  Is that the weight that you use?  Thanks!

For something as simple as biscuits, which I can do in my sleep, I just use volume measures - measuring cups intended for DRY ingredients and for the cream a measuring cup intended for LIQUID ingredients.

 

In fact, the cup I generally use for measuring the self-rising flour remains in the container with the flour all the time, unless the container is too full.


Edited by andiesenji (log)

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

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I agree with andiesenji.  After you get accustomed to making biscuits and know when the dough is at a good consistency, it is a lot more trouble to weigh it out than it is to just scoop it out and adjust the wet by eye. 

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This is the recipe I have used that my kids love. Regular self rising flour works too. 

Georgia Touch of Grace biscuits. 10 biscuits light and fluffy

 

Cream is the KEY to flaky biscuits. This recipe makes a feather light biscuit.

 

Non-stick cooking spray

2 C. Southern self-rising flour (Or 1 1/2 C national self rising flour plus 1/2 C Wondra

-or 1/2 C. cake flour- plus 1/2 tsp. baking powder

1/8 tsp baking soda

1/2 tsp. salt

1/4C. sugar

4 Tbs. shortening

2/3 C. heavy cream or whipping cream

approximately 1 C. buttermilk, or until dough resembles cottage cheese

1 C. bleached all purpose flour for shaping

2 Tbs. melted butter

 

1. pre heat oven to 425ºF. and spray 8 or 9-inch round cake pan with non stick spray

2. Combine the self rising flour, salt and sugar in a small mixing bowl. With fingers or pastry cutter, work shortening into flour until there are no lumps larger than a large pea.

3. Stir in the cream and buttermilk and let stand 2 or 3 minutes. This dough is so wet that you can not shape it in the usual manner. It will look like cottage cheese. (YOU do NOT want it to be stiff enough to shape)

4. Pour the cup of all purpose flour onto a plate or pie tin. flour your hands OR spray a 2-inch ice cream scoop with non stick spray and gather a biscuit sized lump of dough and place it the flour. Roll to coat. shake off excess flour. The dough is so soft it will not hold it's shape so place them tightly side by side so they will rise up, not out as they bake. Continue until all dough is used up.

 

5. Bake just above the center of the oven until lightly browned. Bake until lightly browned, about 15 to 20 minutes, then brush with melted butter. Cool 1 or 2 minutes in the pan, then dump them out, cut them apart, split and butter while hot. Eat!

 

Note: you do not want to make a biscuit with self rising flour that you can shape because the outside of the biscuit will likely be bitter from the leavening used.

 

 

This is an awesome recipe. It bares repeating! 

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I agree with andiesenji.  After you get accustomed to making biscuits and know when the dough is at a good consistency, it is a lot more trouble to weigh it out than it is to just scoop it out and adjust the wet by eye. 

My grandma's recipe was:  Take a bowl half-full of flour (you had to know which bowl) - push your fist into the center to make a hole - fill the hold with cream - stir till it comes together.  Roll out, cut and bake in a hot oven.

That's the entire "receipt" and one had to know to use the self-raising flour - we had Martha Washington or Red Band when I was a child and it came in 25 pound bags while the regular flour was in 50 pound bags. 

 

I actually have the bowl but since it is an original Bauer - made in Paducah - before they moved to Los Angeles, it is rare and collectible so I don't use it.


Edited by andiesenji (log)
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"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

My blog:Books,Cooks,Gadgets&Gardening

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One of the major reasons I often make drop biscuits, instead of rolled and cut biscuits, is for the craggy, brown and crisp bumps and edges.

No ice cream scoop for me.

 

My grandmother always had a batch of drop biscuits dough waiting in the fridge. Especially when it was just her & grandpop living there, she only wanted to make two or three at a time.  She'd just scoop out that much and bake them right then.

 

I wish I had gotten her recipe.  I'm not sure how most recipes would feel about being "held" in the fridge for several days.

 

But it sure was handy.  If you decided to have leftover chicken for lunch, for example, grandmom would always ask, "Would you like some fresh hot biscuits with that?"

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I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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One of the major reasons I often make drop biscuits, instead of rolled and cut biscuits, is for the craggy, brown and crisp bumps and edges.

No ice cream scoop for me.

BTW, your mention of "the craggy, brown and crisp bumps and edges" reminded me of my very favorite type of drop biscuits from my childhood: cat head.

That really takes me back.

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I don't understand why rappers have to hunch over while they stomp around the stage hollering.  It hurts my back to watch them. On the other hand, I've been thinking that perhaps I should start a rap group here at the Old Folks' Home.  Most of us already walk like that.

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BTW, your mention of "the craggy, brown and crisp bumps and edges" reminded me of my very favorite type of drop biscuits from my childhood: cat head.

That really takes me back.

 

 

 

Just gotta have that sometimes!!!!! Not that I don't also like hand-formed or rolled and cut biscuits when appropriate.

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~Martin

Unsupervised rebellious radical agrarian experimenter, minimalist penny-pincher, self-reliant homesteader and adventurous cook. Crotchety cantankerous terse curmudgeon, nonconformist, contrarian and natural born skeptic who questions everything!

The best thing about a vegetable garden is all the meat you can hunt and trap out of it! 

 

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