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Pourover coffee for multiple people


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I use a Hario v60 "1" size nearly every day, for myself. Hario's "1-2" cups is a bit of a joke, it's based on 150ml or 5 oz. I, and most people I know, want 8-12 oz of coffee. 

 

If I'm entertaining, there's no way for me to make more than 1 cup except make 2 smaller cups in my size 1 Hario. I'm thinking of getting either a Chemex or a larger Hario - do the latter make anything larger than size 2? And if not, does the size 2 hold enough coffee for roughly 600ml, or more? I'd like to be able to serve up to 4 people at least 8 oz, so something that holds about a litre's worth of coffee is what I want (roughly 60g coffee)

 

I've never tried Chemex, but I'm willing to. If I don't like the results from their own filters, I've seen videos where people use Hario filters in the Chemex brewer, and just use it as a giant V60.

Edited by Hassouni (log)
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One might also call it handmade filter coffee, rather than one made in a machine. You have a conical or roughly conical brewer, a paper (or other) filter that gets inserted into the brewer, and you then place ground coffee in the filter. You then pour water in freehand, and it drips down into your mug or carafe or whatever receiving vessel you choose.  Done well, it produces a FANTASTIC cup of coffee.

 

Popular brands/models are Melitta (they started the whole thing over 100 years ago), Hario V60 and other Hario models, Kalita Wave, and, Chemex. Here's more info http://prima-coffee.com/blog/a-beginners-guide-to-pour-over-coffee-brewing

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How is the Melitta compared to the Hario in terms of final product? The Hario makes some of the best coffee I've ever had.

 

I'm particularly interested in the Chemex, by the way, as I don't have a standalone carafe - with the Hario I brew right into my mug, and I'd like to minimize kitchen clutter. 

Edited by Hassouni (log)
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One might also call it handmade filter coffee, rather than one made in a machine. You have a conical or roughly conical brewer, a paper (or other) filter that gets inserted into the brewer, and you then place ground coffee in the filter. You then pour water in freehand, and it drips down into your mug or carafe or whatever receiving vessel you choose.  Done well, it produces a FANTASTIC cup of coffee.

 

Popular brands/models are Melitta (they started the whole thing over 100 years ago), Hario V60 and other Hario models, Kalita Wave, and, Chemex. Here's more info http://prima-coffee.com/blog/a-beginners-guide-to-pour-over-coffee-brewing

 

Thank you for the link. I'm thinking of getting this one (using the ubiquitous BB&B $5-off coupon), which looks very similar to the Bee House that's mentioned in the article. Any thoughts?

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Melitta likes to take credit for "pour-over" coffee brewing - but actually the woman who developed the "Melitta process" simply added a paper filter.

 

Pour-over brewing began in the late 1700s with the invention of the "biggin" in France and various types of "filters" including ceramic, metal, and various ways to distribute the "drip" of hot water evenly onto the grounds were developed and patented in the early 19th century.  Then cloth (cotton lisle stocking material) also introduced in France in the mid 1800s - popularly known as a café sac (Fr.) or coffee sock to Americans who brought the idea back - including Mark Twain who wrote some little quips about coffee in France. 

 

I have an antique ceramic biggin filter, with tiny holes - coffee could not be too finely ground - which dates to 1800.  Just the filter, the coffee pot itself was smashed in the '94 earthquake.  I'll try and find it and take some photos. 

 

I have one of the large Chemex brewers - I also have a box of the flat filters purchased about 25 years ago - you have to fold your own into the cone shape.  It brews 10 cups (6 oz - total 60 ounces).  The coffee is very good, I have not done a side by side taste testing of similar types. 

I personally prefer coffee brewed in vacuum pots - if making multiple servings. 

I use a single-serve pod machine and fill my own pods for a Senseo.  I can't stand "stale" coffee and to me it tastes stale after it has been sitting for 20-30 minutes over heat.  I'm extremely fussy about freshly brewed coffee.

"There are, it has been said, two types of people in the world. There are those who say: this glass is half full. And then there are those who say: this glass is half empty. The world belongs, however, to those who can look at the glass and say: What's up with this glass? Excuse me? Excuse me? This is my glass? I don't think so. My glass was full! And it was a bigger glass!" Terry Pratchett

 

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How is the Melitta compared to the Hario in terms of final product? The Hario makes some of the best coffee I've ever had.

 

I'm particularly interested in the Chemex, by the way, as I don't have a standalone carafe - with the Hario I brew right into my mug, and I'd like to minimize kitchen clutter. 

Pretty damn similar - after all, it's the same process. Chemex, too.

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One might also call it handmade filter coffee, rather than one made in a machine. You have a conical or roughly conical brewer, a paper (or other) filter that gets inserted into the brewer, and you then place ground coffee in the filter. You then pour water in freehand, and it drips down into your mug or carafe or whatever receiving vessel you choose.  Done well, it produces a FANTASTIC cup of coffee.

 

Popular brands/models are Melitta (they started the whole thing over 100 years ago), Hario V60 and other Hario models, Kalita Wave, and, Chemex. Here's more info http://prima-coffee.com/blog/a-beginners-guide-to-pour-over-coffee-brewing

 

Oh, OK I know what that is and have used the system myself for years.  Never heard it referred to as "pourover."  Thanks.

For a long time I used a gold mesh filter rather than paper.

 ... Shel


 

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  • 3 weeks later...

Pourover is a pretty common term for use in coffee shops. LaMill coffee shops in California do it properly. There used to be one in the Baltimore Four Seasons, but it closed last week. It is really difficult to find pourover coffee on the road.

 

At home I use a #6 Melitta clear plastic filter cone, using "If You Care" unbleached #6 paper filters. I have a nice burr grinder to fresh grind the beans, a Gaggia MDF0032. Water is filtered to remove chlorine and brought to 198°, and a small amount is poured on the fresh ground beans to wet them. After 30 seconds, 400 ml more water is added, and 30 seconds later 400 ml more water. This is for about 50 g of fresh ground beans at drip setting. More coffee, more water.

 

I put the filter and cone over a glass thermos carafe, in my case a 1.5 L Emsa Auberge. The coffee is good for about 3 hours.

 

http://www.kitchenemporium.com/Frieling-Mini-Chrome-Auberge-Beverage-Server_p_461.html#.U6g1dhZ2VLo

 

The beans I use are an organic fair trade coffee from Indonesia.  Flores Bajawa Ngura, roasted to city roast. I purchase coffee from Royal Coffee in 60 kg bags. http://www.royalny.com/

 

I roast my own using a Gene Cafe roaster. http://www.sweetmarias.com/prod.details-genecafe.php

 

Roasted coffee lasts about a week, ground roasted coffee about 2 hours, unroasted green beans about 2 years.

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Oh I have one  similar to the bonvita  from my  grandmother it says Melitta on it.  It was used to  clear the  boiling coffee after it had been boiled.

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Do any of you have issues with keeping the coffee hot enough? I mean for immediate consumption, not in a thermos for later use. I used to use a Melitta (many years ago), and that was always a problem. More recently I've had Blue Bottle coffee at cafes, and it's still an issue. Add a bit of half & half, and the coffee is lukewarm.

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Do any of you have issues with keeping the coffee hot enough? I mean for immediate consumption, not in a thermos for later use. I used to use a Melitta (many years ago), and that was always a problem. More recently I've had Blue Bottle coffee at cafes, and it's still an issue. Add a bit of half & half, and the coffee is lukewarm.

I use a french press. I make the coffee double strength. When I pour a cup I add half of my double strength coffee and half boiling water. The result is the proper drinking temp (for me anyway). I also fashioned a simple cozy to put over the press. 

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I took the easy way out and saw Ikea selling French Presses for 9 bucks last weekend, and bought one. I've never used my newish Baratza grinder with a FP until recently, and it works great! Very little sediment.

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I use a french press. I make the coffee double strength. When I pour a cup I add half of my double strength coffee and half boiling water. The result is the proper drinking temp (for me anyway). I also fashioned a simple cozy to put over the press. 

Interesting. I also use a French press. I pour boiling water into my mug to warm it while the coffee is brewing in the press. I guess everyone works out his/her own method for these things.

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I will begin using a French press this late summer/early fall while doing my volunteer cooking up in central California. The woman who makes coffee for our group doesn't drink coffee, she drinks mocha and makes the coffee strong enough for the coffee flavor to still come through, about twice the grounds that make a normal pot. I can't drink this rocket fuel so I am moving to the French press so I can have my morning coffee.

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If you are trying to keep your coffee hot for more than two hours, it is a waste of time, since the coffee flavor degrades after that. Simply make a new pot. 

 

For the first pot be sure that the water is at 200°F when brewing and the vacuum container is preheated with hot tap water, and the cups to be used are preheated, plastic cones don't need preheating. If you add milk or other liquids, preheat them.

 

There are very few coffee makers that provide 200° water, and not many have the glass vacuum jugs that I prefer.

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