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philippeberthoud

Calf's Heart Sous Vide

8 posts in this topic

Hello 

I would like to cook a calf's heart sous-vide. Any ideas on temperature and time? Thanks in advance... Philippe


Philippe Berthoud

Chef - TV Show

www.flash-dinner.com

facebook.com/philippe.berthoud

twitter: @phberthoud

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I've always prepared mine as described in Under Pressure.  I don't have the book in front of me but if no one else responds I'll pull out my book when I get to the kitchen.


Chef, Curious Kumquat, Silver City, NM

A recent write-up in Dorado magazine

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Great, thank you very much.


Philippe Berthoud

Chef - TV Show

www.flash-dinner.com

facebook.com/philippe.berthoud

twitter: @phberthoud

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You rock. Thank u[emoji779]️


Philippe Berthoud

Chef - TV Show

www.flash-dinner.com

facebook.com/philippe.berthoud

twitter: @phberthoud

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Hello 

I would like to cook a calf's heart sous-vide. Any ideas on temperature and time? Thanks in advance... Philippe

 

 

We're a little late to the conversation, but recommend 5 hours at 80 °C. Best of luck!


Caren Palevitz

Online Writer for Modernist Cuisine

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I'm curious about the differences between the recommendations made so far. The temperature difference is small, but the time difference is huge. Is this an example of a case where time is not critical past a certain point?


Nancy Smith, aka "Smithy"
HosteG Forumsnsmith@egstaff.org

"Every day should be filled with something delicious, because life is too short not to spoil yourself. " -- Ling (with permission)

"There comes a time in every project when you have to shoot the engineer and start production." -- author unknown

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OK - this is it: I made it exactly like i would do a beef filet: Thickness: 2 cm (Cut the heart in two - trimmed of all the fat etc)

Starting Temp. out of Fridge: 6 C 

Waterbath Temp: / Final Temp of meat: 58 C

Total Time in Sous-vide Bath: 1 Hour 7 Minutes (Left it in for 1 hour and seared it in the pan, seasoned it) Was perfect. Nice medium rare!!

The second time i just grilled the heart (raw heart on the grill with olive oil) for about 3-4 Minutes on each side - depending on thickness. Perfect again.

Was for a newspaper article:

http://www.migrosmagazin.ch/kochen/rezepte/artikel/surf-turf

 

http://www.migrosmagazin.ch/kochen/kochen-mit/artikel/grillieren-mit-herz


Philippe Berthoud

Chef - TV Show

www.flash-dinner.com

facebook.com/philippe.berthoud

twitter: @phberthoud

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