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elyse

Snacking while eGulleting... (Part 2)

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sartoric,

 

I love kale chips and make them the same way you do except I cook them longer. I like mine extra dry and crispy. It's the only good use I have found for the tough overgrown kale I can get at the grocery store. Such a lovely guilt-free nutritious snack.

 

I used to grow my own and pick it much smaller, and it's good sauteed or boiled or in a salad, but once it gets too mature, the only way I like it is chips. Every time I make it I remind myself how much money I'm saving. The commercially available chips are crazy-expensive.

 

Also use a lot less salt than you think you need. The first time I made them I failed to compensate for evaporation.

Agreed, it's the best way to eat kale

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Ugh, that is a shame. They have bred all the heat out it seems like.

Yes but look for peppers with striations on the surface which are often hotter

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Homemade chex mix. I have no idea why I haven't made it before or why I love it so much but I need to bag up the leftovers before I eat it all and make myself sick!

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Homemade chex mix. I have no idea why I haven't made it before or why I love it so much but I need to bag up the leftovers before I eat it all and make myself sick!

I'm with you! I make tons of the original recipe Chex Mix for the holiday season. My family didn't get obsessive about it until I switched from the margarine my mom always used when she made the recipe to my use of real butter when I took over making the recipe. What a difference!  

 

I also noticed that different family members used to pick out different ingredients from the big bowl o' mix whenever they were near it. "Santa" gave them each their own Chex Mix with the extra addition of whatever ingredient they tended to pick out. For example, my S-I-L loves the cashews in the mixed nuts used in the Chex Mix. So her tailored gift of the mix included an entire jug of cashews from Costco. She practically swooned when she saw the gift bag o' mix I gave her.  :laugh:

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“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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I snacked this morning on some home-made Chex Mix (original recipe) while eGulleting and regretted not having a larger bag of it.  :sad:

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“Peter: Oh my god, Brian, there's a message in my Alphabits. It says, 'Oooooo.'

Brian: Peter, those are Cheerios.”

– From Fox TV’s “Family Guy”

 

Tim Oliver

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image.jpeg

From The Kitchn. Mini hasselback potatoes.

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Anna Nielsen aka "Anna N"

...I just let people know about something I made for supper that they might enjoy, too. That's all it is. (Nigel Slater)

"Cooking is about doing the best with what you have . . . and succeeding." John Thorne

Our 2012 (Kerry Beal and me) Blog

My 2004 eG Blog

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I found these this morning in my local emporium and thought "Why not?"

 

shiitake_chips2.jpg

 

They are just deep fried shiitake mushrooms and nothing wrong with that. I took the pictures but by the time I was half way through posting them, the "chips" were all gone. I'll buy them again.

 

shiitake_chips3.jpg


Edited by liuzhou (log)
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imageproxy.php?img=&key=d2a459cbdaa822ccThe first batch of Christmas pimiento cheese.

005.jpg

 


Edited by gfweb duplicate photo (log)
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Half of a grapefruit, freshly picked off one of our young citrus trees. So sweet and juicy. Mmmmmm.

 

IMGP5466.JPG.a2f908262784af4f397f4e69e26

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what a wonderful vibrant pic.

 

i grew up in the SF bay area    a bit south

 

stunning stone fruit  and oranges and meyer lemons

 

for somme reason, no grapefruits.   an over sight I think

 

re the Oranges  : they were a bit sour that far north, My father picked them each AM and made fresh squeezed OJ

 

on the very sour side each AM.  I also have a sour tooth.

 

but i later learned, if the oranges were left on the tree for longer, they became sweet and stunning

 

I made marmalade from them

 

do your trees do this ?   the oranges on The Peninsula had two crops

 

As I used to visit Sabino Canyon a zillion years ago with my parents  ( I was say 7 ) for perhaps 3 - 4 years

 

we camped there for the summer.   No one was there !

 

say Hello from me to the next Gila Monster your see

 

I used to 'hunt them' 

 

with guide book " a guide to reptiles and amphibians "

 

if you were 7    pretty hot stuff !  

 

and here is that book :

 

https://www.etsy.com/listing/206813856/vintage-reptiles-and-amphibians-golden?utm_source=google&utm_medium=cpc&utm_campaign=shopping_us_c-books_movies_and_music-books-science_and_math_books&utm_custom1=e5853c33-c422-4211-9817-2a0dff77c6e7&gclid=Cj0KEQiAqK-zBRC2zaXc8MOiwfIBEiQAXPHrXrOJWVcQGQfgR4OoFy23IJH1GLsj6bgfbL7JeIaltHsaAtor8P8HAQ


Edited by rotuts (log)
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Thanks, rotuts! Our trees are fairly young and don't produce a ton of fruit, but enough for us to enjoy. The fruit is ready to eat in November and they don't usually stay on the tree past December because I eat them all!!! We have a tangerine tree that makes luscious juice, very sweet and clear, a Cara Cara orange that didn't produce much this year and two red grapefruit trees. 

 

I remember having a few of those Golden Nature Guides when I was a kid!  Great series:

 

http://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss_2?url=search-alias%3Daps&field-keywords=golden+nature+guide

 

Sabino Canyon is pretty popular these days, lots of people there at times! 

 


Edited by FauxPas (log)

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Sooo

 

the Sabino  Gila's

 

have moved one ?

 

well good for them

 

do you have two crops on your citrus trees ?

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No, only one crop, rotuts. They blossom in February and we eat the fruit in late Fall (November/December). 

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On 12/12/2015 at 1:38 AM, liuzhou said:

 

They are just deep fried shiitake mushrooms and nothing wrong with that. I took the pictures but by the time I was half way through posting them, the "chips" were all gone. I'll buy them again.

 

 

Deep fried from fresh or dried? 

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One of my local stores is hyper-efficient over sell-by or best before dates and heavily discounts stuff about a month before it is due to "expire". I have a cupboard full of half price, out-of-date green Tabasco sauce - nothing wrong with them.

 

Today, they were selling these off at about one third of the normal price. They are not set to become deadly poisonous until January 9th. At the stroke of midnight.

 

pistachio1.jpg

 

So guess what I've been snacking on this afternoon while on eG.

BTW. The Chinese for pistachios is 开心果, which literally means 'open heart nuts'. Sounds a bit surgical to me! A more pragmatic translation is something like "Happy Nuts".

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Does Chinese have the same alternate meaning for "nuts" as English?

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I am eating lukewarm rasam w rice. I added snake gourd juice to it. The store had green tamarind, and I made a broth from that to sour the rasam.

 

It's really good even though it's concentrated and salty because I left it on the stove for too long.

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Hasselback potato with interstitial pimiento cheese. A tasty two bites.0011.jpg

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4 hours ago, gfweb said:

Hasselback potato with interstitial pimiento cheese. A tasty two bites.0011.jpg

 

That looks really tasty, but it looks like about 20 bites to me. Maybe perspective and a teeny fingerling used? I dunno?

 

Also my one attempt at hassleback was from raw, well-oiled, but turned out very dry. I followed a recipe, but in the future, I'd par-cook. Did you?


> ^ . . ^ <

 

 

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It was a little potato...maybe 3 bites.

 

I didn't par cook it. That sounds like a good idea.  The ends were a little dry.

 

Slicing tip...put the spud between two chopsticks as a knife guide.

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